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Best firewood saw full stop.

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Cody82, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Cody82

    Cody82 ArboristSite Lurker

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    G'day all am new to the forum and after having moved into a rural area with NO heating fire wood is a big thing for my family to be comfortable. I have a little husky saw thats 10yr old and is only for light domestic use so basically s*&t house for my needs now. What my question is what is the best saw for cutting up fire wood of all type including dead trees etc. I dont plan to climb trees with it or anything like that and i'm not dead set husky either. Any advice would be great!
     
  2. matty f

    matty f ArboristSite Operative

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    husky 365 is a good no thrills saw for fire wood infact i intend on getting one my self for ringing up for the log splitter,or if you want a little bit more power a 372 then if you fancy a change from husky then i would go for a 460 I used one for months of every day continual logging of big buts to go on log splitters only thing was i think we kinda wore a couple out after a season,but any saw its not going to last ringing up hardwoods flat out every day,the power bands not as nice as the huskys but not as flat as the 44 but has plenty of torqe cant comment on the 441 as ive never used one.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007
  3. reachtreeservi

    reachtreeservi Banned

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    Pst... Hey, before all the Dolmar guys get to you ....
    Buy a Stihl ( Number one for a reason! )
    Oh yeah, Go big... You'll get there sooner or later anyway
    Might as well start off right... LOL
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007
  4. Roteiche

    Roteiche ArboristSite Operative

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    Hi,

    you need a saw only for firewood? Look for a 50 cc saw with 3,5 - 4 hp. Stihl 260; Husqvarna 346 xp; Dolmar Ps 5000 or 5100; Solo 651. A reason to buy this or that is the nearest dealer with the best service and the lowest price. The saws I wrote you, are all good.

    Roteiche
     
  5. Cody82

    Cody82 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Every saw you guys just mentioned I have been told by 2 dealers are all good saws! The saw I have noticed everybody seems to like and rant about is the 365. The only thing I have noticed it that the 365 isnt part of the XP range so I imagine isnt "classed a professinal saw. This may not be an issue to my needs anyway. One shop even recommended the 357XP over the 365...dunno.
    Im going to another shop tommorow to have a look at the stihl range... Thanks for the imput so far guys...
     
  6. Jack_Shaft

    Jack_Shaft ArboristSite Operative

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    This man speaks the truth. Any heavier than these and your back will not like you. I spend long days in the woods filling a fairly large trailer when I go cutting in the Fall and the 50cc saws are always the best way to go.
     
  7. IchWarriorMkII

    IchWarriorMkII AboristSite Guru

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    I guess it must just all boil down to what kind of wood you are collecting and what you want to pack around.


    A lot of guys say 50cc is the way to go. I tried that... wasn't real impressed.

    Some say a 60cc saw is the best, because its still a light weight saw but fairly light. Been there, just won't turn and burn like I want.

    A few guys suggest that a 70cc saw it about right. Im starting to agree with them. I would consider a 70cc saw driving a 24" bar full comp the starting firewood saw.


    If you want to ask the best, I would almost say step up to a 90cc saw, with a similar bar and chain, for making your bucking cuts. I tend to be attracted to trees under 24" diameter (douglas fir) but there are still plenty of bucking cuts to be made. I would love a big saw to tear up these logs in no time flat. The faster Im done cutting, the faster Im done getting wood.
     
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  8. joatmon

    joatmon Addicted to ArboristSite

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    IWM2,

    OK. Present your scientific evidence to backup that claim. :dizzy: Just doesn't seem right. :cheers:

    Just playin' with ya,

    Joat
     
  9. PA Plumber

    PA Plumber Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I, too, am starting to gravitate toward using a 70cc saw almost exclusively for firewood cutting. Before I new any better, I cut thousands of cuts with my 026 and thought it was a great saw. It Stihl is a great saw, I just like getting my firewood cutting done a lot more quickly these days.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007
  10. rxe

    rxe AboristSite Guru

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    046 with a short bar. If I had to choose one saw to keep from the entire collection...the 046 with an 18" bar would be the one. Light enough, very fast, you can always put a bigger bar on if you need one.
     
  11. Woodie

    Woodie "Cap'n Bullcrap'n"

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    +1

    For me, a 70cc saw is the sweet spot when it comes to firewood. You're looking at roughly 1.5 - 2 lbs difference between 70cc and 50cc, and when you're in the cut, that goes away completely.

    I started with a 60cc, and while it was adequate, there were times when I wanted more snot. Stepped up to the 2171, been smilin' ever since.

    I keep a 24" bar on it, that way I can also rip with it and still leave the cutback zone of the bar sticking out the other side in the clean, fresh air.

    If I'm gonna be doing mostly ripping, I always run skip...those are long chips (noodles), and skip just clears 'em better.
     
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  12. Scooterbum

    Scooterbum Addicted to ArboristSite

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    +2
    I use an 044 w 24" bar and an 028Super with a 20" bar for limbing.
    Although I do have an 066 I bring out for the big wood.:hmm3grin2orange: :hmm3grin2orange: :hmm3grin2orange:
     
  13. davefr

    davefr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Go with a Dolmar PS5100 or 7900 depending on whether you prefer being on the small or large size. Or if you want to try and hit the middle get a Stihl 361.

    If you like Husky the 372XP is a good saw but the Dolmar 7900 will outcut it given the approx. same weight.
     
  14. nikocker

    nikocker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'm a fan of the 50-60cc class saws for making firewood.

    Heck if you gain even 3 seconds using a 70cc or larger saw per bucking cut on say a 16-18" log whats the advantage for the whole tree ??? Maybe two minutes in cutting time?

    Not worth the weight penalty if you ask me. Also those bigger saws are a pain in butt for limbing!

    That Husky 357 XP your looking at would be perfect! :cheers:

    Al
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007
  15. PA Plumber

    PA Plumber Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I used to feel exactly the same way. Then I tried it and really like limbing with a large saw. Things definitely go more quickly. I will say, it took my body a couple of weeks to get used to throwing the extra weight around, but definitely quicker.

    I can block up 1/2 a cord of firewood in about 20 minutes with my 441. There is no way I could do that with my 026.

    A friend and I were cutting a few weeks ago. I could cut 4 blocks to his every one. Of course he was using a Fanno.
     
  16. wdchuck

    wdchuck Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My 028WB is my favorite saw for firewood that's 10" and under, it's light enough to not make my back weary too soon, and is nice for limbing, easy on fuel too. Sharp chains really make the biggest difference.

    Now, when there is going to be consistent wood that's over that 10", then I'll run the 460, 8-pin, and 20" bar, the cutting is over pretty quickly, but my back does feel it.(more excercise)

    ----
    The Dolmar PS5100 is anther fine saw, only used it a few times, but it would be easy on the muscles and the pocket book. Dealer support/availability seem to be the only issues in some areas.

    The Stihl 361 is a great middle of the road saw, up to a 24" bar, could be the one saw that would meet your needs for many years to come.
    ----

    Is there a common diameter or type of wood that you will be cutting, how many cords? This information helps when answering questions. Be sure to try out the different saws at the dealer, hard to make a decision based on looks.

    Let us know what you get and how you like it.:greenchainsaw:
     
  17. Woodie

    Woodie "Cap'n Bullcrap'n"

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    Depending on the size wood you're cutting, it isn't completely about the fact that the 70cc saw is three seconds quicker in each cut, it can also be the fact that the 70cc saw can pull a longer bar, which may save you from having to walk around and make a second cut.

    A 50cc saw is a lot more nimble, however, and I definitely see your point. Which is why I'm buying the first 2153 that hits Michigan!!

    Hey, this is ArboristSite...shouldn't this discussion be a lot less civil? Yeah...I think it should be...

    Forget what I said above...instead make that "A 70cc saw is the only way to go, and YOU SUCK!!!"

    There...I feel better already...
     
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  18. superfire

    superfire Banned

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  19. nikocker

    nikocker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well, those are all good comments. Every body has their point of view - I guess that's why there are so darned many saws to choose from.

    A couple of last considerations for the smaller saws 50-60 cc's. For those of us who are of smaller stature (me I'm 5'7") the smaller, trimmer saws are easier to use hence I feel they are safer. I feel the little slower cutting speed gives you a chance to react in a bucking cut so as not to pinch the saw so often.

    And even if the limbing goes quicker with a 70cc saw as PA Plumber says - I'd rather have it be more controlled. Heck - making firewood is sorta fun . . . I'm in no hurry to have it end all that soon. :greenchainsaw:

    Al
     
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  20. Big Ben

    Big Ben ArboristSite Lurker

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    For firewood, I cut skinny standing-dead lodgepole almost exclusively, so a 50cc saw is a perfect choice for me. It does the job with minimal effort. Were there actually any hardwoods in my neighborhood, or if I cut many trees bigger than 12-14 inches, I'd likely augment my MS270 with something in the 70cc range. Your choice, IMO, depends entirely on what "all kinds of wood" means.

    Oh, and this is my first post here after months of lurking. Thanks to all you guys (and the few gals I've spotted) for your knowledge. How I've managed to avoid buying a second saw by now, I'll never know... :cheers:
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007

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