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Best way to get the logs out useing an ATV

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Slackerjpt, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Slackerjpt

    Slackerjpt ArboristSite Operative

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    Hi everyone, I was wondering if anyone could share their ideas or proven ways of getting the logs out of the woods with the least amount of damage, and dirt on the log. Currently I am just useing a strap and towing the logs out. It works as my ATV can pull anything, but then it's dirty as hell, and there's a path cut into the ground that could hold water. So, any ideas?
     
  2. Somesawguy

    Somesawguy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It seems you will need a log arch.
     
  3. MNGuns

    MNGuns Purveyor of Fine Firewood Consumer of Fine Whiskey

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    There are some log arches that will lift the from end of the log and minimze the impact you have on the ground. To me they seem a bit cumbersome to move through the woods. Another option is to get a nice choke cable from Bailey's ($25), and wait for the ground to freeze so as to keep from disturbing the soil.
     
  4. Philbert

    Philbert Addicted to ArboristSite

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  5. freemind

    freemind AboristSite Guru

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    If the ground disturbance is what really bothers you, have you considered a drag for your ATV? You could use the drag over the log trail when you are done.

    In order to avoid dirty logs, you need to get them off the ground. Using an atv, you can use a log arc, or load them on a trailer.
     
  6. rmount

    rmount ArboristSite Operative

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    Definitely need a log arch. Some models lift the leading end and drag the tail, others elevate the whole log ( up to 20 foot).
     
  7. kugss

    kugss ArboristSite Operative

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    Fill me in on why.
     
  8. doobie57z

    doobie57z ArboristSite Operative

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  9. vinced

    vinced ArboristSite Member

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  10. dingeryote

    dingeryote Blueberry Baron

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    Two options.

    Arch or trailer.

    Trailers get the bucked up rounds out clean, but you'll work harder.

    Stay safe!
    Dingeryote
     
  11. indiansprings

    indiansprings Firewood Purveyor

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    Personally I would go with a trailer, that way it be a multi-task investment. A trailer comes in handy for a variety of uses, whereas a log arch is very limited in performing any other task. Just buck your logs up and load the rounds on the trailer and pull them out.
    Buy a big enough trailer to do the job, it could double as a trailer to load your 4-wheeler on to tow behind the truck.
     
  12. cre73

    cre73 ArboristSite Member

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    I built a small trailer last year just for this purpose. I made it exactly the same width as my four wheeler so I could manuvear it through the timber. I carry my saws in a saw box on the back rack. Works out perfect for me Trailer holds about 12 decent size rounds.
     
  13. cedarman

    cedarman ArboristSite Operative

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    I made a choke chain for my atv. wrap the chain around the log and pull the log out of the woods onto the logging road. buck it up and throw it in the back of the truck.
     
  14. fields_mj

    fields_mj AboristSite Guru

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    I would agree with what others have posted. Either a log arch or a trailer. I went the route of the trailer, but since they logged over 1100 large mature trees from the woods that I cut in last winter, I haven't had a need to get down into to the ravines with my ATV to try the trailer out. Words of caution on the trailer. Be aware of how much you have on it, and how easy it is to tip over because it can take the ATV and you with it when it goes.

    The reason that I chose a trailer instead of building a log arch was A - Cost, and B - Usefullness. I bought the trailer used and made a few mods to it. I have about $150 wrapped up in it. It just is big enough to haul my ATV on, which makes it very functional for me as I hate running the ATV up a set of ramps into the bed of my '93 F250. Get a little snow or even some rain and the ATV doesn't always like to stay on the ramps. :( On the down side, it has a 4' wide deck, and the 14" wheels stick out another 8 or 9" on each side, so its a lot wider than my ATV. It only has a 1K axle (or at least that's all I'll put on it) so it's limited to how much it can acutally haul by the axle, not the deck. Also, it's easy to run the wheels into stuff when I'm pulling it through the woods trying to go around trees. At that point it becomes a real pain to get everything straightened back out and moving again. What ever tree I hit is now stuck between the ATV and the trailer with little or no room left for me to turn and get things clear. All in all the trailer works well so long as there's adequate room to get it in and out, and so long as the terrain isn't super rough or too much of an incline. You can also go with one of the smaller trailers made to pull behind a lawn tractor, but you're going to need to take a lot of trips to fill up a truck bed with one of those.

    I really wanted a log arch, and still do, but looking at them I can tell that I'm goign to have over $200 in one plus a lot of time. I'd LOVE to build one just for fun, but I just don't have the time, and don't have $200 to put into materials for somethign that's only able to be used for cutting firewood. If I were cutting on my own land, then I would certainly build one and just haul the logs up to the barn lot for storage until I was ready to cut them.

    I also looked into the log cones/sleds, and those looked like they had some promise. You'll still have dirt in the bark which is going to be hard on your chains, but the cone/sled keeps the front of the log from digging in making it easier to drag. I've heard of guys using the hood off an old car, or modifying a plastic 55 gal drum do do this as well. I opted against it because I still had to drag the logs, and I still had to cut dirt packed wood.
     
  15. mlh29

    mlh29 ArboristSite Lurker

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    I have and use an 2004 arctic cat 650 atv, started as an le model with heavy duty bumpers. I mosified the rear frame/ bumper area and have a 2500lb warn at winch it there. So I have front and rear winches. I use the rear winch and a short choke chain to pull logs in close to atv, usually raising front of log off of ground in process. I have dragged logs 18 in and 25 ft long with this setup.
    It will make marks on the trails but not too bad. I also agree with waiting til dry season or winter when ground is cold,, logs move easier. Good luck
     
  16. chumwithrum

    chumwithrum ArboristSite Lurker

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    How about a small forwarding trailer, that's what I use. If you can pull alongside the trees right where you drop them you could load em up dirt free. They're easier to buck up because they're off the ground and it's way more productive than a log arch where you're pulling one or two trees at time. You could pull a descent sized load depending on your terrain.

    I pull the trees out, buck them into 9' or 15' lengths and then load them. I don't worry about the dirt too much, just watch out for little rocks stuck in the bark. I usually get two to four loads bucked up into rounds before I need to give the chain a little tickle.
     
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  17. Garmins dad

    Garmins dad Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Chumwithrum can you take a picture of that hitch? I think i know what they did to lessen the shock of starting and stopping.. just wanting to make sure..


    BTW Nice trailer and thanks for sharing pictures.
     
  18. Philbert

    Philbert Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Really nice looking trailer. Is this a unique trailer, or just something I have never known to look for?

    Would like to see a photo sequence of how you load those upper logs.

    Philbert
     
  19. chumwithrum

    chumwithrum ArboristSite Lurker

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    It's just a pipe with a couple of stiff springs on it that fits inside another pipe. It also rotates 360* in case the trailer rolls over it doesn't flip the four wheeler too.
    Are thinking about building one?
     
  20. chumwithrum

    chumwithrum ArboristSite Lurker

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    I got it from novajack.com it also has a removable dump box.
    There is some more pics here http://www.arboristsite.com/firewood-heating-wood-burning-equipment/143850-4.htm

    I usually save the smaller logs and load them last. When they're too heavy to load by hand I winch them on the same way as in the pictures, except the chain hooks into the holes at the top of the stakes. I'll get some pics the next time I go out.
     

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