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Can I save this tree if I cut it down?

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by wood4heat, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. dennis066

    dennis066 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Getting off the main subject are we? :)
     
  2. Mustang71

    Mustang71 ArboristSite Operative

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    Idc if ya wanna go off topic and talk about fence posts. Lol I'm just saying that didn't make any sence when compared to the pictures.
     
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  3. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You can do what you want, however the research has been done. Choose to accept it or not, your decision. Coating the cut with tar is not effective.

    Besides what will happen with that fir stump is that it will pitch and the pitch will harden and partially coat the cut face. In addition the cut face will case harden over time and naturally repel water, especially if it is cut on the slope.

    The argument regarding the fence post is moot, because the even if the fence post is covered in bark, the end is not. In a stump, the bark is bound to the roots and root crown prior to it being cut down.
     
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  4. wood4heat

    wood4heat Addicted to ArboristSite

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    So how about a follow up question. If I do cut the bad side on a slope as suggested is there a better time of year to do it? Like now while it's cool and wet, later in the spring when it's more actively growing, summer when it's warm and dry???
     
  5. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There is some research that indicates summer cuts result in faster wound closure. however with a wound that big, I don't think the time is going to make a difference.
     
  6. jefflovstrom

    jefflovstrom It was a beautiful day!

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    I would still do it in summer.
    Jeff
     
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  7. ropensaddle

    ropensaddle Feel Lucky

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    Summer cuts tend to attract pests though right ?:rolleyes: It is why I only trim in winter, attracting bugs transmitting disease seems counter productive to ipm and phc.
     
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  8. ropensaddle

    ropensaddle Feel Lucky

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    Well, but then; you don't have a winter :laughing:
     
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  9. Jim Timber

    Jim Timber 1/4 bubble off

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    There's different schools of thought on this. Winter is least likely to attract pests, fungus, mold, etc; while potentially leaving the wound open longest (trim in late winter if possible). Summer subjects the tree to stress from temp and drought although it's actively growing at least one more spurt prior to winter dormancy depending how late in summer you cut it. Spring is too wet and risks rot/bugs entering the heart wood.

    I still prune my apple trees in the summer since they respond with vigorous growth. I've found oak and maple will also stump sprout almost immediately when cut in the growing season. So my "un-certified by anyone" opinion would be to wait until the spring rains are likely to be over and then cut it so you get a couple growth spurts in before it goes dormant in the fall. All the trees I'm familiar with have 4 growth spurts per year (at least up here in MN).
     
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  10. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

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    This is a Douglas fir, a conifer, it has determinant buds, that is, the each year's growth is pre determined when the buds are set the previous year. On very rare occasions, you may get a second bud set. Totally different to your apple tree.

    Given what you are doing, I don't think it matters when you cut the tree. Over the next couple of years, you should notice callous growth around the edge of the cut as the grafted roots attempt to callous over what it perceives to be a scar.
     
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  11. CanopyGorilla

    CanopyGorilla climber....sawyer

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    Just like talking to a fence post
     
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