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carpenter bee traps

Discussion in 'Off the Topic Forum' started by CGC4200, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. J.W Younger

    J.W Younger ass kissing impaired

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    As a kid I can remember catching the ones with the white dot on their heads.
    Don't think I'd trust my eyesight to try that now.
     
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  2. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'll bet the timing for setting traps is critical for success.
    You're in NY, and probably three to four weeks behind middle TN seasonally. You put yours up two weeks ago, I put mine up two days ago. My bees have already marked their territory and are sitting on their nests... they have no reason to seek out a new hole. I think it's time for me to go into seek and destroy mode and hope for better results with the traps next year.
     
  3. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    There does not seem to be a bee problem here in California. The bumble bees and the humming birds are exactly the same size. The humming birds are almost silent, but then here comes the bumble bees like a roaring B-17. When then run into you they will leave a small impression. A couple of years ago about April we had a small snow storm that left a couple of inches of heavy snow. I had a small section of carpet in front of my portable shelter and some blankets used for padding and covering my ice chests laying around. After shaking the snow off I hung them on my side boards of my pickup and started cutting. About an hour latter my gloves started filling up with wood chips or so I thought. After shaking my gloves only to discover they were filled with bees. About the same time lightening started striking the backs of my hands. As I looked around it became clear that a large swarm of bees were collecting around my pickup. The bees were being attracted to any material that was damp. So as quickly as possible put some distance from my pickup. After getting my bug net on and some extra sweat shirts was able to move my pickup away from my cutting area. Years ago when I tried to set up some traps to help with this problem they filled up in a matter of minutes. So have had to adjust my schedule a bit to keep from getting overwhelmed. From what I am being told I understand that the mudders wasps have invaded much of the domestic bee culture and weakened the domestic bee. When the weather is a little more damp the wasps are invaded by the domestic bees so it seems to work out. Thanks
     

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  4. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Were there any nests in the blankets? Some time ago, I shook out an old blanket I had in the barn to find a bumble bee nest in it.
     
  5. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    No nests in the blankets. As soon as the sun started to go behind the hills the bees left and I quickly spread anything damp over the bushes away from my camp. A couple days latter no signs of bees unless I spilled some water on the ground then they were back in 10 minutes. Not sure if the altitude matters, but this is at 5,600 and 15 miles away from any domestic activities. Thanks
     

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  6. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Is that a normal thing for bees to do? Seems strange to me.
    What's killed all those trees in your photo? Would that be drought?
     
  7. mga

    mga wandering

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    leave them up...the wood bees are always looking for a hole to climb in
     
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  8. mga

    mga wandering

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    when there's a drought they flock to water. we had a serious drought last summer and my neighbors fountain became the watering hole for many yellow jackets. it was interesting to see them fly away towards different nests.

    but, they hung around that fountain lapping up as much water as they could carry
     
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  9. mga

    mga wandering

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    not really. I made them in the middle of summer last year. the bees were already attacking the wood, so, I made the traps and the eliminations began.

    when it gets real warm they'll be out. put the traps where they have made holes already.

    up here it's still too cold for them. we only had like one or two warm days when they came out.

    we're looking at property in Tennessee and south Carolina. I found some great deals in both areas but we're not ready to move yet.
     
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  10. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    Yes this is normal behavior for bees. Five or Six years ago when the weather was quite damp it actually seemed worse. I have learned to respect the bees more than ever. It takes about an hour for bees to discover a water source and then they are there at least 500 strong covering four square feet. The bumble bees are huge and look scary, but all they do is bang into you.

    What killed the trees was not one fire , but two fires started in the early 2000's. The USDA was concerned about the area because most of the healthy trees were damaged or downright destroyed so they had them cut down and put into piles to either burn or haul away. As it turned out neither happened so that is what has kept me well supplied. They would burn them all if they could get a burn permit, but they can not. Some of the area was weakened by drought conditions and then the bark beetle moved in and then the bark beetle moved in and the bark beetle moved in. On my property out of 24 larger pine trees 24 larger pine trees died. The drought and bark beetle problem started about thirty five or forty years ago and every year for most part kept getting worse until we had fire after fire. Thanks
     
  11. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That's sad.:(
    Can't they do anything about the beetle?
     
  12. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well, it was just a hypothesis. :p I'll leave them up and see if I get any takers.

    Where in TN were you looking?
    It is beautiful here and the cost of living is relatively low, but you better bring your $$ with you 'cause it's hard to find here. :rolleyes:
    There are always real estate auctions and estate sales going on here... you can get a real good deal on property that way. Check online for "TN land auctions."
    They're having one near me soon for 1700 acres of mountain property. Wish I had that kind of $$ to invest.
     
  13. mga

    mga wandering

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    In the north east region of Tennessee and the north west region of South Carolina

    We have noticed that houses are rather expensive there but we have seen some great deals too

    Gotta wait for the old lady to leave work first
     
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  14. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Sounds like a great plan... something to look forward to in your "Golden Years." :cheers:
     
  15. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Just for clarification, pesticides are chemicals used to kill pests, which could include weeds (herbicides), fungus (fungicides), mites (miticides), insects (insecticides).

    The domestic bees are actually imports from Europe. Native bees include the bumblers and Mason bees. (Mason bees are 70x better pollinators than honey bees, but are solitary and don't produce honey).

    Bark beetles are an native insect that attacks usually conifers. There are different species of bark beetle and each targets a different species of conifer. For example, the Southern pine bark beetle targets the souther yellow pines whereas the Mountain pine beetle attacks the northern 2 needle pines.

    Bark beetles are part of nature's plan for forest stand renewal. In a natural environment, when pines get to be mature (in the case of Lodgepole pine - attacked by mountain pine beetles - this would be 140 years) they will get attacked by pine beetle which will kill stands of pines. Forest fires will follow burning the dead material, enriching the soil and providing the heat necessary for the cones of the pines to open and new seedlings to germinate. The circle of life. What isn't taken into account is the fact that humans now utilize pine trees for lumber, pulp and non-timber resources like vistas, turpentine etc. On an individual tree basis, chemicals can be injected into the stem to protect the tree, but it's expensive. Impractical on a stand or forest level basis.
     
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  16. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Interesting... but where do carpenter bees fit in - native, or imported?
     
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  17. grizz55chev

    grizz55chev Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Those are a whole different bee, actually they are a bald faced hornet and are the nastiest little critters out there! They will go out of their way to sting you if are within 50' of their best! They dive bomb you and aim for your forehead!:cool:
     
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  18. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    BC had an excellent responce to this issue. The bark beetle has been plague for as long as I can remember. Aerial application has proved to be effective under certain conditions, but quite pricey. Here in California we have had a transformation in that beetles are now attacking the white fir trees. The fir does not have much value for me however it could have a major impact to our environment. Since the bees go to bed at night no matter what is done they will not be effected because application usually happens at night.

    Now the whole problem seems to go away for most part if the forested area is under a harvesting process. The forested lands that are constantly thinned are able to withstand desease and drought if they have been harvested of the older growth trees and the bushes have been burnt from time to time. Here we see the tree hugger types who say that the forest are sacred and should be off limits to humans. A good balance of good management in the forested areas have proven to be very benificial to the bee population which are needed for the pollen process for many crops that people deppend upon. Thanks
     
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  19. J.W Younger

    J.W Younger ass kissing impaired

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    How to Identify Carpenter Bees: 6 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow
    www.wikihow.com › ... › Housekeeping › Pest Control › Bee and Wasp Control
     
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  20. grizz55chev

    grizz55chev Addicted to ArboristSite

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    IMG_0640.JPG This is the critter we call carpenter bees here in Northern Cali, not a bit of white or yellow to be found. They are completely black. I'll post a pick of the Bald faced hornet for future reference.
     
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