ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Ceramic Fiber Board (inside/top stove)

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Billy_Bob, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. Billy_Bob

    Billy_Bob AboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    898
    Likes Received:
    83
    Location:
    Oregon
    I have two side by side "Ceramic Fiber Boards" on the inside top of my woodstove and one of these boards has broken.

    These are about 1/2 inch thick, white, and very lightweight.

    And they cost a young fortune to buy from the woodstove manufacturer!

    Question: Is "Micore Mineral Fiber Board" the same thing as "Ceramic Fiber Board"?

    I can buy the Micore in a 4 x 8 ft. sheet for about the same cost as two boards to fit in my woodstove.
     
  2. kd460

    kd460 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Brighton, Michigan
    I have the same question. Mine is not broke, but have wanted to get a spare set. I agree with the sticker shock.

    I don't think the micore is good for what we need. It is listed as fire resistant. I grabbed a piece of what I thought was micore at work during a remod and took it home (small piece). A propane torch cooked it, so probably a no go.

    Your looking for something like ceramic fiber board. Her is a link to a company that lists a large selection, but, not sure if they sell retail to general public.

    http://www.foundryservice.com/fss_catalog.html

    Also look under kiln and refractory supplies. If you find something, post it here! I still want to pick up a spare set. KD
     
  3. Locoweed

    Locoweed AboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2004
    Messages:
    650
    Likes Received:
    130
    Location:
    Ft. Davis Texas
    A couple of pieces of 1/4" plate cut so they will nicely fit, painted with a couple of coats of high temperature paint will last you for a few years.
     
  4. elmoleaf

    elmoleaf ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Buy some castable refractory or make your own as follows:
    Get perlite from the garden center. Mix with furnace cement that's been watered down to a slurry. Use about 50/50 mix.
    Set up some forms 1/2" high on top of a piece of glass or plexi or similar non-stick surface. Fill with the perlite/cement mixture and let dry for a few days. Remove from forms...you now have a replacement piece.
     
  5. Billy_Bob

    Billy_Bob AboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    898
    Likes Received:
    83
    Location:
    Oregon
    Actually the rest of the woodstove is made of metal...

    So why not use metal for these pieces as well?

    What does using the fiber board do?

    Is this an EPA "help the woodstove emit cleaner air" thing?

    Or some function of making the woodstove work better?
     
  6. kd460

    kd460 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Brighton, Michigan
    From my understanding (not saying I am right), it does help with emissions, but also helps with efficiency. If the baffles are removed, then the stove/insert is just like an older style stove. On my insert, it forces the flow of gasses to hit the top of the unit and flow to the front of the unit around the baffles (past the secondary burn tubes) and then back over the baffles to the flu pipe which is 2/3rds of the way towards the back of the insert.

    Probably would consume more wood and put out less heat. I am also guessing that it helps with the secondary burn in assisting the unit to initiate secondary burn by trapping some of the burnable gasses near the secondary air tubes and or forcing the gasses to flow past them for the secondary burn to be accomplished.

    Secondary burn is a "pollution control" thing, but you also get the benefit of more heat out of it as well.

    Steel plate is an interesting thought, I just wonder if the weight on top of those stainless secondary tubes (this is how mine is set up-the board rests right on the tubes) would make the tube warp or droop when the tubes get hot. I know I get my tubes glowing red sometimes. Also wonder about warping of the steel plate?

    I would assume that if the steel plate was OK, why wouldn't the stove manufacturers just use steel plate? With the amount of steel they use, it would probably be cheaper for them to just use the steel and not have to bother with the hassle of stocking/purchasing (from an outside source) the fragile refractory board. I don't really know the answer to that question. KD
     
  7. KsWoodsMan

    KsWoodsMan Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,818
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    Flint Hills of Kansas
    Nice idea ! I wonder if the first firing has to be the hottest as is the case with ceramics ?
     
  8. Locoweed

    Locoweed AboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2004
    Messages:
    650
    Likes Received:
    130
    Location:
    Ft. Davis Texas
    Steel plate is an interesting thought, I just wonder if the weight on top of those stainless secondary tubes (this is how mine is set up-the board rests right on the tubes) would make the tube warp or droop when the tubes get hot. I know I get my tubes glowing red sometimes. Also wonder about warping of the steel plate?

    It will get pitted and eat up eventually, but in my stove it hasn't caused the tubes to sag. The coats of high temp paint will help it last longer and if you want to, take the plates out every couple of years and clean and repaint them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  9. Marc

    Marc Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    217
    Location:
    Dudley, MA
    One of the ideas behind using the ceramic fiberboard, I believe, is because it insulates better than steel or cast. The local temperatures immediately around the secondary burn tubes and baffle are supposed to be hot enough to acheive near complete combustion... which means ~1100 deg F.

    The opposite side of the baffle should stay cooler. Steel and grey iron condunct better than the ceramic type baffle provided, so the steel baffle may loose heat to the cooler side faster resulting in lower temperatures around the burn tubes and hence creating a less efficient and more polluting burn.

    All of that's just conjecture of course, but it seems fairly logical.
     
  10. KsWoodsMan

    KsWoodsMan Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,818
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    Flint Hills of Kansas
    :agree2:

    Keeping the initial burn chamber temps high allows for a cleaner burn sooner in the cycle and longer.

    I would try to go back with something as close to original as possible.
     
  11. Kansas

    Kansas AboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    815
    Likes Received:
    78
    Location:
    Kansas
    I just went thru this myself on my new insert and as expensive as the ceramic is that is how the stove was designed, I went back with OEM parts.

    I broke mine not knowing what it was or how brittle it was trying to remove it so I could get the flue installed properly.

    I think the insulating factor has about as much to do with how the stove works as the function of a baffle to redirect heat around the tubes but thats how I reason it out.

    Kansas
     
  12. Zoe on er

    Zoe on er New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ohio
    Can anyone confirm that the 50/50 mixture works. I've built a wood burner so I'm not sure on where to get it at the cheapest.
     
  13. huntindog1

    huntindog1 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    indiana
    Go on ebay and search "ceramic fiber board"

    They are good for 2300 degrees.

    ceramic fiber board | eBay

    35.4" x 23.6" x 1/2" piece $26.88 :

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ceramic-fiber-board-2300-F-900-mm-x-600-mm-x-12-5-mm-1-2-/120968891783?pt=BI_Security_Fire_Protection&hash=item1c2a4ecd87#ht_500wt_1156

    Then get you some ceramic 1" insulation to lay on top of the ceramic fiber board for extra insulation. This is how my stove is setup from the factory. Some stoves come only with the boards with no insulation on top. Helps the secondary burn by keeping the heat in around the secondary burn tubes. Thats why they dont use steel plate is to keep the heat in the fire chamber to get secondary burn going.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fiberfrax-Unifrax-Ceramic-Fiber-insulation-1-x-4-/270974319788?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f1753fcac#ht_500wt_1180
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  14. iceman7668

    iceman7668 ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    new carlisle In
    I work at the Company that makes this fiber in the E-Bay link. The roll listed is our HP product. It is rated at 2300 degrees. Our AZS fiber is good for 2600. Look on E-bay for Duraboard. This is a hard board product. We make it in differant thickness's and some of it is rated at 3000 degrees. Way cheaper off flea bay than through our distibutors.
     

Share This Page