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Crimson King Maple- New Growth Question

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by happy1957, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. happy1957

    happy1957 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Hello everyone,

    I was here last year after a sudden defoliation of my Crimson King Maple, caused by anthracnose.

    We left the tree alone to see how it would fair this season as it never rebounded last year.
    This year the tree was half dead, sprouting leaves only on one side . We did have a huge sun scorch crack and after reading numerous articles I suspect that's what did the weak tree in. After cutting it down the crack was almost through the entire tree.

    On June 1st we cut the tree down and hoped it would regrow. Immediately we had new growth to the right of the stump. Less than six weeks old is 40 inches tall, dense and huge-leaves, but green? To weeks later, another sprouted to the left of the stump. This is now about 4 weeks old, 24 inches tall also dense, huge leaves, but is purple like the original tree.

    I don't know anything about this tree type, can it produce two different colors? Will the green one eventually turn purple as it was darker earlier on, although never deep purple.
    Could the green be a sign of weakness? Should I let them both grow for awhile before cutting one down? Both look so healthy and dense.

    Than for your answers, happy
     
  2. Urban Forester

    Urban Forester AboristSite Guru

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    Crimson King is a grafted tree. When you cut the tree down, you cut below the graft on the side with the green leaves, thus the "original DNA" of a "standard" norway maple root system took over. The other side of the cut still had the "grafted DNA" therefore it maintained its red/purple color. That sucker growth will have weak a branching habit, and will grow more like a shrub than a tree. It will be difficult to maintain. My guess is that if one side failed it was either a girdling root (very common in Norways) OR Verticilium Wilt a vascular diease that is soil borne. My recommendation is to remove the tree entirely and plant something else. In Michigan the Norway Maple (of ANY cultivar) is listed as an invasive/ undesirable tree, due to its ability to re-seed itself. They are also VERY prone to the problems listed above, I would find another species you like and re-plant.
     
  3. happy1957

    happy1957 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thank you Urban Forester,

    As I said, I didn't know much about this tree and was so hoping letting it re-grow was a good idea. The girdling roots is NOT the problem as we dug it up last year to look, but the wilt is in question. We cut down a diseased or dead branch and had it analysed and it came back negative for the wilt. This was a perfectly normal tree in every way, had been growing about 10 years, and last year when the leaves were young and tender, following 12-14 days of rain, the sun came out and the tree turned black and all the top branch leaves fell off only recovering on the lower branches that had not really turned fully black. I loved this tree and hoped it would recover, but actually came back worse this year, Last year the top branches were affected, this year, half the tree. So we cut it down and I had read about the wilt and that you should NOT plant any trees susceptible to Verticilium for up to 15 years, but after the state tested the branch and found it negative, it was suggested we let it re-grow since it has such a good root system. we thought it truly was just the sun scorch crack that weakened it since it was cracked almost straight through.

    I guess it's time to make a decision, but what could we plant there? As you know here in Maine everything is green, we wanted to have an opposing color in the yard as we have numerous huge Oak trees on our property. It's in the full sun, sits on a hill so not to wet. I hope to get something for shade and not a slow grower. Any suggestions at all? I'm too old for that. :) I have included the photos of last years issue. Again, thank you for your reply.

    View attachment 244759 View attachment 244760


    http://crimsonking2011.shutterfly.com/?role=-1






    the to the a
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2012
  4. Urban Forester

    Urban Forester AboristSite Guru

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    Looking at the pictures, you only have 2 dominant stems. Not a shrub, I would be very tempted to let it go. It MIGHT become a very unique tree.
     
  5. happy1957

    happy1957 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thank you again!! You made my day... Although I'm stumped about which one to keep. I love the purple shade, would it be best to let them both go for now, or cut one down to give the other more energy? They original tree stump is right between the two of them. Would this create two separate trees completely? See why this was perplexing to the tree novice. Thank you for sharing, I wasn't aware about the Crimson King being a grafted tree, in fact didn't really know what grafting meant until I looked it up. I think this tree has a will to live as strong as I want it to.

    Should we put a tee-pee over it this winter as we may end up with the darn sun scorch problem again. My husband and I just saw a tree that was half dark and half green and couldn't figure out how that could happen. I guess we know now.

    One last question. My tree was nearly 10 years old. I read today that the tree was self seeding as you had mentioned and that there are double seed pods like the helicopter seed pods I remember as a child. This tree Never produced seeds nor have there ever been any reseeding evidence around it. Is that normal or do you think the tree had issues from the time we bought it?

    Thank you for your expertise. Happy again!




     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012

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