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Drill Holes to Lighten Bar?

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by MtnHermit, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. MtnHermit

    MtnHermit ArboristSite Operative

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    For my trail saw I'm considering drilling holes to lighten the main and spare bars. I'll need to carry the saw several miles so ounces count. I would avoid the spot welds so the bar didn't delaminate. Will the bar hang in the cut?

    Is this a bad idea?

    Any been there, done that comments?
     
  2. jus2fat

    jus2fat Two Harley Fatboys

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    Unless you're gonna drill some BIG holes...it won't help you..IMHO

    I personally would just go to using a slightly shorter bar..!!

    This question has been asked a number of times...

    I've yet to read anyone recommending it and NO ONE actually doing it.

    Also..those bars are really hard metal...and need very hard bits to drill it..!!
    :cheers:
    J2F
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
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  3. Johny Utah

    Johny Utah AboristSite Guru

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    I hope you are joking. If the saw is to heavy well bring a smaller one, if not then just suck it up and quit being a complainer.:bang:
     
  4. branchbuzzer

    branchbuzzer Undiagnosed

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    You'd be way better off worrying about getting your own body fat% down and getting your VO[SUB]2[/SUB] max up than drilling holes in your equipment. Unless you've got those two things at their best, your equipment weight is a very miniscule part of the equation in going up.
     
  5. StihlyinEly

    StihlyinEly Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Like those who have commented already, I have not drilled out any chainsaw bars. FWIW, I think the torsion resulting from cutting on uneven, hilly terrain will put stresses on a drilled out bar that could lead to problems.

    That's just a guess, however. Probably some one will chime in with more direct experience. I'd be interested to know what others' direct experiences are.

    As an alternative if you decide not to drill out a couple bars, there are more lightweight options such as the Tsumura, Stihl Light, and to some degree Sugihara bars compared with standard bars.

    I'm not presumptuous enough to tell someone who shoulders a saw for miles going in and out to "suck it up." :monkey:
     
  6. carym2a

    carym2a AboristSite Guru

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    By the gods NO!, HARD stuff bars are, to drill them you must first anneal it then drill what you want, then retemper it to get it back to usable. Oregon also makes some nice light bars in lots of size's

    Cary
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
  7. Gologit

    Gologit Mostly retired

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    :monkey: According to your previous posts you're running a dime-store Husky with a 20 inch bar. If you can't handle that little bit of weight you need to put the saw down and either do some strength building exercises...or take up knitting.
     
  8. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water

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    Bluefish and branchbuzzer like this.
  9. Jacob J.

    Jacob J. Tree Freak

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    This is a pretty hard crowd to ask questions about making the job easier.
     
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  10. ndlawrence

    ndlawrence ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    Iv'e seen people cut their tooth brushes in half on extreme long hikes, So if he is really walking a crazy distant then a light bar would make a big difference. He may be clearing hiking trails in the middle of a forest and only be making a few cuts compared to carry the saw all day long.
     
  11. Walt41

    Walt41 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    On a 24" Oregon bar you can bore holes 1/2 the way thru on both sides and save about 1 lb, I would not recommend drilling all the way thru. Better off to hit the gym or start hand splitting.
     
  12. discounthunter

    discounthunter Addicted to ArboristSite

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    switch to a hand saw.
     
  13. StihlyinEly

    StihlyinEly Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I had the same thought. In my experience over 35 years in mining, cutting, and construction, there are guys who are tough and guys who talk tough. The two usually do not go together. There are exceptions to that rule, of course, and maybe the tough talkers here really are tough.

    And I made the same possible conclusion ndlawrence did.

    Depending on distance and application, that could definitely be the ticket. A razor sharp bow saw with a spare blade or two is light and wicked fast! :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
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  14. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Addicted to ArboristSite

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    As I read this, I got flashbacks on humping thru the central highlands of s.e. asia. You do want to save every ounce. I even removed the sling swivels from my M16.

    I say go for it and drill big holes or lots and lots of small ones. Use a carbide drill bit or find someone with a plasma cutter.
     
  15. MtnHermit

    MtnHermit ArboristSite Operative

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    I've come to that conclusion too.

    Considered that first, but on Baileys I could only find 16" .325 bars, same as I have. I want a second B&C in case I bind in the many cuts, could abandon the B&C or cut it out with the spare.

    Did a search in titles for "holes" and found a number of threads, seems the biggest issue is the hole(s) filling with sawdust and binding the bar.

    I drilled my Poulan bar for the Husky oil hole, easy. Guess that speaks more to the Poulan bar.

    Surprised at the number of Boo Birds brought out by such a simple question. If I knew everything about chainsaws, no reason to be here.

    Thanks J2F, for your thoughts.
     
  16. Trx250r180

    Trx250r180 Junk Man

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  17. Guido Salvage

    Guido Salvage Supreme Saw Whoreder

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    You need to think big. Rather than drilling a bunch of small holes, just make a single big one...

    [​IMG]

    No thanks needed.
     
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  18. Jacob J.

    Jacob J. Tree Freak

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    I've done that on many occasions. A well sharpened handsaw cuts wood faster than most people would think.
     
  19. Guido Salvage

    Guido Salvage Supreme Saw Whoreder

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    The problem is that the pack cost twice as much as his saw. Looks like a nice rig, however.
     
  20. Guido Salvage

    Guido Salvage Supreme Saw Whoreder

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    Very true, and in wilderness areas it is the only method allowed for trail maintenance.
     

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