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dying pine tree

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by hrmwinn, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. hrmwinn

    hrmwinn New Member

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    I have a douglas fir pine tree (not absolutely sure but I think this is the type of pine tree) which appears to be slowly dying from the bottow up. Bottom branches are brown top are still green. Any ideas on how to save this pine tree would be greatly appreciated. It has been looking like this for about 2 weeks after long hot summer. Tree was planted 16 months ago and is about 6-7 feet tall
     
  2. helpmytrees

    helpmytrees ArboristSite Lurker

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    Well first, it will be important to know if we're dealing with a Pine or a Fir.

    This is to help determine if it is biotic (insect/disease related), or non-biotic (mechanical damage, climate stress).

    Just checked your post again. It's that new huh. Usually with trees 1-2 years old, and especially conifers, I would say it quite possibly could still be transplant related. That is in the sence that it has not fully recovered from the stress and has not developed a sufficient root system to support the canopy through periods of drastic climate change.
     
  3. rivahrat

    rivahrat ArboristSite Operative

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    how about some pics
     
  4. hrmwinn

    hrmwinn New Member

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    Thanks. I have confirmed it is a fir. I was wondering if the fact it is turning brown from the bottom up is significant. Any ideas to try to save it?

    Thanks
     
  5. helpmytrees

    helpmytrees ArboristSite Lurker

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    To see some pics would be a great help. Since fir is not indiginous to SC it wil have problems getting established after transplanting. A hot spell will complicate issues and if drought is involved it will be compounded further.

    Also, are the lower branches dieing, or are the inner needles just browning/falling off? Does this tree happen to be in a fairly or even mildly moist location?
     

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