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EAB reaches Wisconsin

Discussion in 'Plant Health' started by glennschumann, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. glennschumann

    glennschumann ArboristSite Operative

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    arboristCT likes this.
  2. ddhlakebound

    ddhlakebound Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thanks for the post. It mentioned in the link that EAB had also been found in the bootheel of Missouri.
     
  3. John Paul Sanborn

    John Paul Sanborn Above average climber

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  4. Kneejerk Bombas

    Kneejerk Bombas Tree Freak

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    And a second find about a mile away a day or two ago.
     
  5. John Paul Sanborn

    John Paul Sanborn Above average climber

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  6. Fuzly

    Fuzly ArboristSite Operative

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    Very sad

    I remember hauling load after load of elm firewood when Dutch Elm hit us hard up here. It didn't take long until it was rare to see a live elm tree. They're coming back a little, but very slowly.

    This invasive seems just as bad or worse. I hope somebody with a better scientific understanding than me comes up with something that can eradicate EAB. My home is surrounded by ash and other assorted hardwoods, I want them to stick around.
     
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  7. John Paul Sanborn

    John Paul Sanborn Above average climber

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    Here is the info for the eab email blast! Could you send this info to the commercial and utility members only.



    Thank you,

    Brian Pelot

    WAA Publicity Chair

    The plan is to look at the EAB infested trees, peel some bark to look at galleries (maybe even see EAB larvae) and reconvene in the community room at the Fire Department to discuss your concerns, ideas, etc.

    Because we only have room for 60 people per session, please limit the number of staff to 1 or 2 people per company. To reserve your seat and receive additional details, please contact Kathy Gonzalez at Kathryn.Gonzalez@Wisconsin.gov or call at 608-275-3227 to indicate what session you are attending.
     
  8. glennschumann

    glennschumann ArboristSite Operative

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  9. glennschumann

    glennschumann ArboristSite Operative

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  10. Urban Forester

    Urban Forester AboristSite Guru

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    I hate to say it, but when it's "discovered", that means it's been there for 3 to 4 years. Good luck folks, you can't believe what that little bas---- can do. I would recommend regardless of where you are in Wisconsin, start treating your high value Ash tomorrow. A big mistake some Co,'s make is spreading themselves to thin. You can't save every tree, don't try. Concentrate on the high value ones.
     
  11. Ed*L

    Ed*L AboristSite Guru

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  12. treevet

    treevet Banned

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    There are no hopes or prayers for eradication. As has been said the only game plan is to treat individual trees and hope the treatment holds up under high pressure in the midst of heavy infestation. Right now the best treatment is Treeage (Emben) and immidacloprid in injection and improve health maintenance.
     
  13. dingeryote

    dingeryote Blueberry Baron

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    I wish you Wisconsin guys luck in all this with the EAB.

    Two years ago my area of Michigan was in the quarantine thanks to firewood brought into the area by tourists from Indianna/Chicago.

    Last year the EAB was found all over the county.

    This weeks edition of the Farm news announced the whole state is screwed.

    My contact at NRCS flat out told me the only cure is to cut the Ash trees, as innoculation trials weren't working well enough to stop the infestation and renewal from the folks bringing in contaminated firewood.

    I cut all of my Ash last year, and am burning it now. It hurts.

    If you can. Push for random checks by your states DNR at the state Border during summer camping season, and set fines so they HURT bad enough to cause thoughts of suicide.

    If the EAB was a lawn pest, or destroyed video games, it would have been controlled by now...

    Best of luck to ya!
    Dingeryote
     
  14. treevet

    treevet Banned

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    The entire infestation originated in Michigan. What you mentioned may have happened (in your locality), but for most areas it was movement of firewood out of Mich. into other areas that started it all.

    The lack of control/eradication is not from a lack of caring or interest but rather because of the life cycle of the insect and difficulty in contacting it with insecticide in mass.
     
  15. dingeryote

    dingeryote Blueberry Baron

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    Treevet,

    From the info I get, since initial discovery, containment/ controll has been hampered more by the movement of firewood by tourists than any other aspect. In fact, if you look at the pattern of outbreaks they are all near or dead center of recreational parks. Folks are still hauling contaminated wood all over the place unchecked.

    A quick scan and verbal questioning(My employment then, had me in the Park several times a week) of Campers at a nearby State park and guess what I found? Ash, some contaminated, and the tourists were from Michigan, Indianna,Illinois,Ohio, Missouri. All of them brought wood with them from the last place they camped or home. None had a clue about EAB.

    Obviously the attempts at public notification aren't adequate, and enforcement is lacking.

    I would disagree with your assessment.

    In order to foment interest or caring, folks need to be informed, and then to provide incentive, there needs to be enforcement of the quarantine.
    Little has been done in this regard.

    Otherwise a "Firebreak" of innoculation and applications of Immidan will be ineffectual on stemming the overall spread, regardless of timing/gestation.

    I'm also curious as to the port of entry for the EAB, and if any new regs have been enacted.

    Stay safe!
    Dingeryote
     
  16. treevet

    treevet Banned

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    Immidan? Never heard of this being used. You may mean Immidacloprid?

    Anyway, you may disagree if you wish with established opinions and form your own but the fact remains that firewood contributes to and accellorates the movement of the borer but control has been difficult at best. Individual trees may be systemmically treated to reach the encapsulated larvae however it is too expensive to treat every tree everywhere (woods included) and the new epicormic shoots that spring up from the dead ash. During flight period they are all over the place and feed very little for stomach or contact poison. "Firebreak of innoculation? Not feasible. In the beginning there were attempts at clearcutting and this failed, because of budget cutbacks and again difficulty in eradicating the insect because of it's nature (and also transport of firewood, yes) but they have also been found to travel (flight period) farther than the previously estimated 2 miles per year.

    I think the pattern of outbreaks appear around highways more than parkgrounds, a much smaller recipient of firewood than homeowners. Maybe if no one ever moved a stick of firewood or lumber or nursery stock then a slow down might occur. People are never going to all be able to discern ash from other wood/trees. And where is the budget to enforce this as they couldn't even keep staff in offices after a couple of years?

    Port of entry, you have no leg to stand on in this one....Michigan, 2002 or earlier.
     
  17. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Lot of good points treevet. Mind if I expand a couple of thoughts here?

    There is also the problem that it is difficult to detect in early stages of infestation. There were many areas across the "firebreak" that were infested before the firebreak line was even first penciled onto a map. WAY too much of our money was wasted on this long after it was obvious we were cutting a firebreak behind the fire. I was probably moved to MANY small pockets (likely throughout Ohio and Michigan, Chicago, etc...) before regulation #1 was written.

    Much earlier. It was discovered/identified in 2002. Probably there at least 10 years before it was identified. So yeah...the rest of us can blame it on Michigan. Northern Michigan can blame it on tourists, but they should start looking to Detroit tourists first, then to the rest of the tourists.

    Yes, little public education/information has been a problem, but not the only problem.
     
  18. dingeryote

    dingeryote Blueberry Baron

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    Treevet,

    Yep! Imidaclorpid. Imidan is a similar pesticide I use, my slip.

    So now the EAB is travelling past 2 miles?
    Swell.:(

    Agreed on the budget cuts for random inspections. Our DNR here is stretched really thin as it is. However, every State park in this country has a Manned Gate where Campers and Picnic goers check in.

    It wont do much for folks moving wood for heat and lumber, but that is more localized anyway.

    The initial reaction here was interesting. Quarantine, cut, and spray some areas. Notification to folks in the quarantined areas was non existent.

    Unless you saw and read the tiny blurb in the local paper, or had reason to stop into the USDA extension, you didn't see or hear of it.
    It's still that way, and it's still a shame.

    As for port of entry, I am concerned with continued re-infestation, not who's state is to blame.

    Detroit was where it was first discovered, but where did it come into the country, and what has been done to eliminate the possiblity of it getting here again?

    Another good excuse for standardized plastic pallets and cribbing I guess. No one is going to tell the Chineese to stop shipping or expect them to stop using ash pallets.

    It's likely going to be a hard fight next year, as most states are going to further cut back on thier budgets, and the Feds are cutting back as well.

    Good luck to ya!
    Dingeryote

    Some links for folks.
    www.emeraldashborer.info
    www.michigan.gov/eab
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2008
  19. treevet

    treevet Banned

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    All good points Dingeryote,

    Some of the difficulty in early detection is the initial hit is in the upper canopy. I search all the time for my town but in remote areas they are building up like rust (it never sleeps). Best of luck to you too.
     
  20. treevet

    treevet Banned

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    [​IMG]

    Me searching with help and advice from my email contact Dan Herms. Negative again but sooner or later one of these suspicions will not be. This section of green ash, broken by our hurricane was a perfectly healthy tree and holes in the upper canopy. These are 2 suspicious conditions worthy of a little digging around. Take that back.....3 suspicious aspects....1. Perfectly healthy ash....2. Holes in the upper canopy....3. Green ash; a favorite target
     

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