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honey locust

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Pcoz88, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. Pcoz88

    Pcoz88 AboristSite Guru

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    Has any body burned this wood? I got about 5 more tree's of this to cut down for a friend of mine.:yoyo:
     
  2. logbutcher

    logbutcher Banned

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    Nice Wood, Give me One

    Nice wood. Up there in heat value-BTU's.
    And it splits like butter, is light when green (not much sap), and burns and coals well.
    Not much in our woodlands since it was planted near homesteads for shade and fast growth. Old timers used it for trunnels ("tree nails") in boat building, and fence posts since it rots slowly.
    Deliver one of those log lengths here ?:blob2: Take a hard right at Bucksport, then head east, all the way.
     
  3. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I don't mean to contradict what Logbutcher said, but it sounds to me that he is confusing Black Locust for Honeylocust. I've worked with both; Honeylocust is very wet with water when freshly cut which means that it takes awhile to season. When seasoned, it burns nicely, although a little on the fast side, but throws decent heat. Black Locust is the one that is fairly dry when green and is used for fenceposts and other things because it's very rot-resistant. Honeylocust will develop fungus on the cut sides when it rains; Black Locust is clearly the more desirable of the two woods. Just my experience with the woods. :)
     
  4. Dadatwins

    Dadatwins Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I hope it is a thornless honey locust, those thorns can make for a miserable day. Locust has one of the highest BTU output of the hardwoods, not sure of its ease to split, the ones I have done are very dense and stringy. Very hard wood will play havoc on your saw chain also. What size diameter tree are yo cutting? Large diameter locust good to keep some extra bar oil around and pour it on the bar for the bigger cuts. have fun :)
     
  5. Haywire Haywood

    Haywire Haywood Fiscal Conservative Social Retard

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    I know the 16" black locust I just split up last night fell apart with ease. 8lb maul, most jumped apart on the first swing...
     
  6. turnkey4099

    turnkey4099 Tree Freak

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    When it is dry, it will do that. Green is another story. It ranks in the 'moderate' splitting ease category IIANM. Not bad splitting even green though. I have split fence posts from it as well as a lot of wood.

    Harry K
     
  7. Haywire Haywood

    Haywire Haywood Fiscal Conservative Social Retard

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    I cut it down green about 2 hours before I split it.

    Ian
     
  8. logbutcher

    logbutcher Banned

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    Contradict Away..besides, You're Correct

    Right. We don't have much Honey Locust here, but I confuse the 2 since Black Locust wood is a cream/pale yellow color. :bowdown:
    When is my log length load coming Downeast ?:pumpkin2:
    Appreciate the info....on target. Thx.
     
  9. Pcoz88

    Pcoz88 AboristSite Guru

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    Thanks

    Thanks for the reply's.Logbutcher where do you want that deliverd??:hmm3grin2orange: It had the thorn's on it.So itnot good fire wood? It was about a foot to foot and half diameter.Have three more to cut down.
     
  10. logbutcher

    logbutcher Banned

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    Directions to Paradise

    Go due east til you hit big water. Boston is fine. Then head north ~ 200 miles to Bucksport. Google it for detatils. Take a sharp right east back out to sea. Find Cape Rosier.
    Warning: it is bow hunting for deer, open season for bear as we speak. If you wait too long, the real open season on deer begins 1 November. Those thorns are no help. :heart: The people go crazy for awhile until the deer figure out where to hide. :bowdown:
    Few cut much during November hunts here. You did wonder why most saws are bright orange ? :bang:
     
  11. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Addicted to ArboristSite

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    No problem..do you have much Black Locust up your way? It's great stuff. Honeylocust isn't bad; it just isn't as dense as Black is. And it's full of water when wet, whereas Black is fairly dry. And like someone else said, Black can dull your saw in a hurry when it's dry! Take care..:)
     
  12. Mkarlson

    Mkarlson ArboristSite Operative

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    Here in west-central Indiana Black Locust and Honey Locust are very prominant. The black can really wreak havoc on your chains especially if its kind of dry. The honey is managable, I use a machete to shave off the thorns before felling and bucking. Thorns are horrible to deal with but are not attached to tree very well. A guy I know mixes 25% gasoline to 75% diesel fuel in a 2 gallon sprayer and sprays the thorns and lights them with the trees standing. I've not witnessed this but he swears the thorns just burn off with that mixture. I'm not sure I'd reconmend that but if conditions were right I'd think bout it. I find both somewhat easy to split and both being tall and slender with few limbs make great fire wood, people I sell to almost prefer both of them to most anything else.

    One of my favorite bow hunting spots is a thicket loaded with honey locust, hedge, and multi floral rose.....lets just say I stopped wearing rubber boots to conceal my scent. :bang: The thicker the sole and the leather the better when around these areas. :laugh:
    Mike
     
  13. logbutcher

    logbutcher Banned

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    Better than Air or Kiln Drying-Burn the Tree

    Neat way to dry wood: burn the things on the stump ! Now that is new :givebeer: Got to try it out with the flamethrower today:popcorn:
    You mean to say that some of you kill Bambi ? :confused: Some of the All Greens even Bambiize trees--diseased, dead, overgrown, blowdowns, don't matter :cry: "Leave that tree live you clear cutter.":greenchainsaw:
     
  14. SAWFORD79

    SAWFORD79 ArboristSite Member

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    Honeylocust

    Here in western Kansas we have some honey locust and most people love it except for the thorned kind but we knock them off easily. In my opinion it splits easily green or dry and is a shade of pink when split. It seems to burn nicely for everyone that buys it, but one thing to keep in mind is I am comparing it to Chinese elm, and cottonwood which are the 2 prominent trees in our area. Cut it, split it and enjoy the fire!
     
  15. Gark

    Gark ArboristSite Operative

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    Looks like honey locust makes about 26.7 million BTU's per cord, same as bitternut hickory. (Between apple: 27.0 and Burr Oak:26.2). Sweet! I say GO FOR IT! Good thing we planted those 5 HL trees, now just have to wait 80 years for the wood...
     

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