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How long should firewood season?

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by OR nurse, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. OR nurse

    OR nurse ArboristSite Lurker

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    As the title says, how long should cut and split firewood season for a home woodstove? I try to cut and split wood in the winter/spring to burn the following winter. I keep the top covered during hard rains in the spring, but leave it all summer uncovered. I burn oak, ash, and hickory mostly.
     
  2. wigglesworth

    wigglesworth Booned

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    I think that is about common, cut this year for next year's wood. The real answer is season until the moisture content is below 20%. But FWIW I just loaded the stove with some hickory I cut in May and some dead standing oak I just cut last month. The dead standing was probably more seasoned than the hickory.
     
  3. BlacknTan

    BlacknTan ArboristSite Operative

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    Around here, it just gets seasoned until it turns cold enough to burn it... Could be 2 months... could be two years.
     
  4. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I have 30 acres of woods, so I just leave dead trees standing till I need them, "seasoned on the stump". I like to let them dry more after splitting, but some times they go right in the stove. Even if they have been dead for several years they have a good bit of moisture in them and you can see the steam boiling out of the ends of the wood, Joe.
     
  5. Log Hogger

    Log Hogger ArboristSite Operative

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    Cut and split, as much as you can, all of the time

    I cut and split year round, but as a weekend warrior, and in the summer I do less because I'm gardening an acre or so. Seasoning takes a full summer or longer, but like rarefish said, dead standing/fallen timber takes less. As a result of Emerald Ash Borer, I have no shortage of dead timber.
     
  6. lone wolf

    lone wolf Tree Freak

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    for burning 6 months and you should be good the thinner you split the quicker that it dries up to a year is perfect if not covered 2 years your growing mushrooms at least in the northeast.covered it will last a long time many years you can burn wood green the same day you cut it you just need to have a hot bed of coals already working to achieve that feat.
     
  7. BloodOnTheIce

    BloodOnTheIce Account Hold

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    I'm burning Ironwood and Black Locust now that I cut back in August, and Black Walnut that I cut back in June. I've got 20+ face cord of Red Oak, still to cut and split for next winter and the year after.
     
  8. 7sleeper

    7sleeper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Until dry....

    see first answer and you know a moisture meter is needed under the tree in two weeks. ;)

    7
     
  9. lone wolf

    lone wolf Tree Freak

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    would you say locust burns the hottest and longest?
     
  10. woodgrenade

    woodgrenade AboristSite Guru

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    Osage Orange, but try finding it.
     
  11. Kwdog75

    Kwdog75 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I don't really have a time frame, i just love being out in the woods playing with my saws. The wood i am burning now was wood i cut this past winter/spring.
     
  12. REJ2

    REJ2 Firewood Hack

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    The Hackberry I cut last winter is what I'm burning now. Have heard you could burn Hackberry green so of course I tried it last winter, smoked and oozed steam and water like crazy. It burns much better after 10 months. REJ2
     
  13. Bowtie

    Bowtie Gearhead

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    Hackberry is good wood, and often overlooked. Ash and hackberry and mulberry are my 3 favorite woods to burn, and they season quicker than hedge.

    Real hard woods like oak, osage orange, locust, hickory do better with 2 years seasoning, but it depends on how you store it for seasoning.
     
  14. computeruser

    computeruser Addicted to ArboristSite

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    12-24 months seems best for my drying setup, which has species mixed and is in a suburban setting without really good airflow like you'd get out in a more open, rural area. Ash is usually good in 6-12 months and White Oak at 24-36 months is perfect.
     
  15. Teddy.Scout

    Teddy.Scout Guest

    I hope I don't get yelled at for thread jumping!

    What about logs 2' in diameter, how long would they have to be down, piled before they could be busted and below 50% moisture content! I know get a moisture meter, but what is your guys opinion?
    Thanks TS
     
  16. knockbill

    knockbill AboristSite Guru

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    I burn oak, ash, and hickory mostly.[/QUOTE]

    i let teh oak season for at least 18months,after its split and stacked,,, ash can be burned when its cut,,, i had a whole ash tree, cut in august last year, that i cut and split, and burned it last winter,,,,,
     
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  17. pioneerguy600

    pioneerguy600 Tree Freak

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    Dry wood burns hotter and cleaner so my wood is usually cut split and dried/seasoned for 3 years. First 2 years piled outside with just the top of each row covered, the third year piled under a roofed over, sides open wood shed. That way I don`t have to clean the glass in the stove doors or punch creosote out of the chimney.
    Pioneerguy600
     
  18. Bowtie

    Bowtie Gearhead

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    ash can be burned when its cut,,, i had a whole ash tree, cut in august last year, that i cut and split, and burned it last winter,,,,,[/QUOTE]

    I know I say it all the time, but ash is by far my favorite firewood because of what you said. It doesnt have a lot of moisture even green, and it makes a lot of heat, plus doesnt leave a lot of ash.
     
  19. The Burning Rom

    The Burning Rom ArboristSite Operative

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    Standing trees will dry faster if you cut into them around the base while they're still standing. It lets the water run out.
     
  20. Teddy.Scout

    Teddy.Scout Guest

    Pioneer,
    I agree with that 100%
    But I(AND THE WIFE!!!!!!) think firewwod grows on trees! LOL
    And with the advent of acquiring some new family members(brother in laws). I find my firewood stash(32 cords) getting a little low!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    If need I have PILES, PILES of 2-3year old logs 2'+ in diameter, that are for next year. What might I see in moisture content from them if I busted them down into firewood!

    And from now on the newest members of the family will help! LOL!!!
     

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