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How to become a logger...

Discussion in 'Forestry and Logging Forum' started by KevSauce, May 12, 2010.

  1. KevSauce

    KevSauce ArboristSite Lurker

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    So I am curious what it would take to become a logger?

    Is it a seasonal job?

    What is the average pay for someone with no experience?

    Is there a union?

    Can I bring my own saw?

    My principal interest would be working in Eastern US & Canada or Europe. I have dual US and Canadian citizenship and I have a bachelors degree too!!!... just in case anyone is interested in me! :)
     
  2. D&B Mack

    D&B Mack Sawin Wit It!

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    Just curious, Canada and Europe but no Northwest U.S.?

    I'm no logger by any stretch, but I guess...

    1. Hardwork & Endurance
    2. Mostly not seasonal (around here in pa)
    3. 14-15 per hr (again, around here0
    4. No union I know of
    5. Some cutters around here are subcontracted and must have all own tools.
     
  3. slowp

    slowp Tree Freak

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    Time to bring this out. :cheers:


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  4. hammerlogging

    hammerlogging Addicted to ArboristSite

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    first thing that comes to mind is romantic idealism and a liking for the bottle come evening. to be successful, add to that list be pretty hard core, in whatever way that comes out in you.
     
  5. GASoline71

    GASoline71 Mr. Nice Guy (Moderator)

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    Go into a "loggin' town"... walk in to the nearest waterin' hole... holler "Loggers are pu$$ies!" ...at the top of your lungs.

    If you survive the beating... go get yourself a set of caulks... you're ready.

    Gary
     
    IcePick likes this.
  6. 371groundie

    371groundie ArboristSite Guru

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    mechanized loggers want to hire equipment operators and truck drivers. how many hours a day can you spend in the seat? its pretty much a job a highschool drop out with a little training can do.

    hand loggers (chainsaws and cable skidders or tractors with winches) are generally one man shows. they will somtimes work together but each man works pretty independantly.

    i know one guy who has 6 cable skidders he hires men to operate. each man cuts and skids by himself. he wont put more than two guys on one peice of ground. each man has his own saws and landing. the head honcho gets paid by the mill. subtracts trucking, stumpage (what the landowner gets), and somthing for his trouble finding the wood and maintaining the skidder, the workin man gets the rest.

    the best way to become a logger is to start cuttin trees and sell them to the mill. where you get the wood, how much you pay for it, how much you get paid for it, how you get it out, etc is what makes you a rich logger or an out of work logger.
     
  7. oregoncutter

    oregoncutter ArboristSite Operative

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    That's funny! Don't forget to add Hey to the end of pu$$ies that would help with the beating out here, wearing brand new rigging pants, hickory shirt, suspenders, and a new leather saw pad wouldn't hurt either! Good luck it can be an up down roller coaster of a way too make a living better have balls, a quick mind, and a strong body, otherwise take You're degree, and find a desk somewhere!
     
  8. ryan_marine

    ryan_marine ArboristSite Guru

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    First you need a mill to buy your logs. Second you need some trees that can be cut for timber. Third you need to cut them down. Forth you need to skid them out and have them hauled to the mill.

    Now that all sounds easy. But there are other things you need to consider. Break you saw and you out of work. Break your self and you out of work or dead. Don't pay a person (i.e. log hauler, skidder, or worse the PO) and you could end up in jail. Write down every transaction. Best thing I can do is tell you to find some one to work for first. It will make you life alot easier.


    No
    $0.01 per BF
    No
    You have to. Also own gas and oil.

    Ray
     
  9. RandyMac

    RandyMac Stiff Member

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    Logger is a catch-all term, could mean anyone who works in the timber. Breaking in as a faller, first time out is rare, plan on working your way up. There are all kinds of loggers, chokermen, landing chasers, riggers, buckers, choppers, stumpsitters, equipment operators, your degree may make the office happy, but is worth spit in the woods without expirience. Be prepared to do anything, buy heavy boots and a couple dozen pairs of gloves.
    Oh yeah, leave your chainsaw home when you go talk to the outfits, over eagar beavers are joke material for a week or so.
     
  10. mercer_me

    mercer_me ArboristSite Operative

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    In Maine your best cahnce of getting a job working in the woods is in the Winter.

    Most people I know that hire people don't supply a saw, so you have to bring your own.

    Most guys pay by the load. $160 a load is the going rate around my area.

    The guy you are working for is going to want you to have a a twich cut and limbed by the time they get back with the skidder.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2010
  11. slowp

    slowp Tree Freak

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    I showed up on a landing to see what was going on and ended up helping rig up for a couple of hours this morning. I pimped for the hooktender. They were desperate. :) He was kind enough to have cleared a trail from the road up to the tail tree. He said he did it for "the old farts."

    Then, for recovery, I went to town and hung out in a fabric store that specializes in quilting fabrics. There was a discussion about a fabric that I can't spell.
     
  12. Spotted Owl

    Spotted Owl ArboristSite Guru

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    If you have a degree and an education, why? Why would you want to work for little to no pay and certainly a minimal living wage at best in the beginning. Hard work, no matter what the weather, how many old loggers have you seen and in what condition are they and their bodies in? For get the saw for the first couple years at best. Also forget about any notion of job security, imagine if you can going to work everyday and wondering if there will be work or even a place to work for the next day. Benefits forget about those too. The only benefit is that if you work you MIGHT get paid, other than that there are no benefits. Better be willing to work with drunks, druggies and those running from the law, seems like that is becoming the norm out there now. The big companies for the most part are gone and you will be down to the "gypos" for any work that you might find. If you have a degree I would assume you are about 22yrs, can you work for and take orders from some one who is 18-19 with no education sometimes no high school education.

    No having said that IMO logging is a great work if you can handle it. I quit school and started when I was 16. Worked my way up into cutting crews. I listened when the old guys told me to get out. No I have a job that pays well and has benefits. I also still work cutting every chance I get and do the rat work in the brush as often as possible. The EXTRA pay is good and it is work I enjoy doing more than most can understand.

    Find out where the bosses have breakfast or coffee on the weekends and be there waiting for them. Find out where the crew bus meets in the mornings and be there waiting on them. Your gonna have to prove yourself before they will even talk to you. When they tell you to give up do it. These guys can usually tell who will and won't make it when they see them.

    This is from my experience in the NW.

    If all else fails follow the advise Gary gave you.




    Owl
     
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  13. Gologit

    Gologit Completely retired...life is good.

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    Well said.
     
  14. GASoline71

    GASoline71 Mr. Nice Guy (Moderator)

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    Yup...

    Gary
     

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