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Improving the efficiency of your wood stove.

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by isaaccarlson, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. isaaccarlson

    isaaccarlson Addicted to ArboristSite

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    For those who have an air inlet that is not on the stove door, why not pipe it outside to get fresh air for the stove instead of drawing air from the house, only to have it replaced by cold air(which will cut down on efficiency and create more drafts. Kinda seems logical, don't ya think? Why pull the warm air from your nice cozy den and replace it with cold air? Its kind of like running the air conditioner and heater at the same time.:blob2:
     
  2. isaaccarlson

    isaaccarlson Addicted to ArboristSite

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    In my mother-in law's case

    it solved the problem of the house out-drafting the short chimney. It now burns vigorously as opposed to barely smoldering and blowing smoke out the inlet!!!! Keeps pet mice out of stove also;)
     
  3. The Lorax

    The Lorax ArboristSite Operative

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    We call that a balanced flue over here, some people run a duct under the floor to the fireplace if they are smart enough building new, others run a duct down next to the the chimney.
    I have Heat recovery ventilation so ,most of the heat is recovered anyway as the old stuff is exhausted.
     
  4. Ductape

    Ductape Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Seriously? Thats a bet i would'a lost. I would think with that much air going up the stack, using outside air for combustions gotta be more efficient.:(
     
  5. Wife'nHubby

    Wife'nHubby Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You are talking about an 'Outside Air Kit' (an "OAK"); either google it by that name or swing on over to ********** - the hearth forum located here:

    http://www.**********/econtent/index.php/forums/viewforum/2/

    Sounds like they like them.

    Shari
     
  6. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

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    True. And, by the time you hook it up, seal the connections, and try to control the intake for an optimal fire, you have driven yourself bonkers. :dizzy:
     
  7. Wife'nHubby

    Wife'nHubby Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I should clarify: A lot of the newer EPA freestanding woodstoves have a punchout on the back of the stove specifically designed for an OAK.

    Shari
     
  8. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

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    The wood stove shown in your avatar looks very good. I assume it is yours. Pray tell, Shari, does it have an OAK with a pipe leading to the outdoors that feeds air to the fire as it burns?
     
  9. Wife'nHubby

    Wife'nHubby Addicted to ArboristSite

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    WD, Yes it's our stove but it resides uninstalled in our garage someday to be installed so for now we use the fireplace with a blower system. Nope, it is not an OAK stove.

    Shari
     
  10. WidowMaker

    WidowMaker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I pitch my tent in the camp that says it better and if I had a easy way to do it I'd put my money where my mouth is...
     
  11. Techstuf

    Techstuf ArboristSite Operative

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    Baloney. If done right, it's absolutely amazing!


    If the myth's been 'busted' as you say, then it had to have been done by those two jokers on that "mythbusters" T.V. show.


    Try peddling that 'bead' of knowledge to the Native Americans, some of whose ancestors used to dig covered trenches from the fires inside their teepees to the outside in order to efficiently feed them while keeping their backsides warm....


    TS
     
  12. Wife'nHubby

    Wife'nHubby Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Not to beleaguer the point, but the testing you refer to was done in 1989. USA required new EPA stove standards in 1991 or 1992 or thereabouts. I have no idea how the new EPA requirements relate this 1989 testing. I could be wrong, but I seem to recall the Canadian members on heath.com stating all new stove installations in Canada require an OAK. (There are differences in Canada vs USA stove installations as covered in manufacturers installation instructions.)

    Shari
     
  13. Techstuf

    Techstuf ArboristSite Operative

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    Thanks for clarifying, Treeco. Your earlier apparent blanket statement seemed to indicate that they don't help, period.

    Ideally, one can use one's wood stove as a thermal heat pump, affording clean, heated outside air to mix with interior air and be sent throughout the home, helping to create a slightly positive pressure, so that whatever former draft inlet locations in the home, instead become outlets. In tight homes, such a setup can be made to work very well indeed.

    And in today's orwellian atmosphere, positive pressure can be a good thing.


    TS
     
  14. dingeryote

    dingeryote Blueberry Baron

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    I don't think any gains would be worth the risks with an older non airtight stove.

    My Quad was designed for outdoor air intake, and the crew that installed the thing initially had the intake in my 3 season room when they were stopped. We ran it like that for a while with a window open until I got a hole punched through the floor and plumbed things to the outside.

    I could notice a very small advantage in vaccum at the intake with a window open. Once plumbed outside though, the difference on windy days CAN be seen if the wind is just right. A hard south wind acts like a blower fan and the intake has to be closed a bit, so it's a good thing it's airtight.

    I'd hate to see where an atmospheric change caused Carbon monoxide to build up in the house with a non airtight unit.

    Just some thoughts.

    Stay safe!
    Dingeryote
     
  15. Techstuf

    Techstuf ArboristSite Operative

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    If one is still using a non airtight stove, then all bets are off, and I do mean, ALL....



    TS
     
  16. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    As per NFPA 211-9.3
    Air for Combustion and Ventilation
    Solid fuel burning appliances shall be installed in a location and manner so as to allow satisfactory combustion of fuel,proper chimney draft,and maintenance of safe temperature. Where buildings are so tight that normal infiltration does not provide the neccesary air,outside air shall be introduced.
     
  17. Wife'nHubby

    Wife'nHubby Addicted to ArboristSite

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  18. brown2501

    brown2501 ArboristSite Lurker

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    the best thing i did

    I did a lot of research found good and bad. well finially did it took about one hour - hole saw- dryer duct. THE BEST THING I DID. heats the whole house with no drafts and no problems two years now.
     

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