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Log splitter wedge sharpening

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Craig21901, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. Craig21901

    Craig21901 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Can anyone recommend a good tool/ technique for sharpening a splitter wedge. I have a TW P1 and the wedge is getting a bit dull. I have a small stone for axe sharpening, but thought a larger tool or file might be better for the splitter wedge. Thanks!
     
  2. Hedgerow

    Hedgerow HACK

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    Some fellas use a large file... I just use an angle grinder... But I'm a bit of a cave man too...
     
  3. KiwiBro

    KiwiBro Hold my beer and film this...

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    Face cut with an angle grinder, full chisel back cut with a Silvey, and then polish between timed cookie splits until you get your average 8-tooth sprocket, modded muffler engined downwind splits down to about 0.98424 seconds per split. then you're good to go, my friend.

    If that sounds a little OCD, then I'm with Hedgerow. Careful angle grind then stay on top of it with a file.

    HTH.
     
  4. jasult

    jasult ArboristSite Operative

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    KISS FACTOR
    KEEP IT SIMPLE - angle grinder
     
  5. ponyexpress976

    ponyexpress976 nipple fritters

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    tw-6 gets touched up with the 4" angle grinder. I see a lot of "urban" wood with nails and such. I ocassionaly zap it with my small welder then sharpen to keep it from getting to thin.
     
  6. fields_mj

    fields_mj AboristSite Guru

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    Don't want to hi-jack the thread, but has anyone ever tried laying a bead of hard weld on a worn wedge?
     
  7. Guido Salvage

    Guido Salvage Supreme Saw Whoreder

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    Small grinder would work best (and be the fastest). Used to spend some time in North East, ate many a meal and played a bunch of cards at Harold's Restaurant at the far end of Main Street.
     
  8. husky455rancher

    husky455rancher Addicted to ArboristSite

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    flap wheel on a 4 1/2" angle grinder
     
  9. imagineero

    imagineero Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'd avoid it.

    I used to do a lot of hardfacing as a boilermaker, some stick and some mig. Welding seams onto the outside of augers, and some work on big diggers, mostly it was welding huge sections (500lbs+ of welding wire per item) on copper pots for use in smelters. The pots were big enough to live inside of. I used to hardface some of my own tools, until I read of a guy who got killed by his nail punch. He was a boiler maker and hardfaced the tip of the punch, something I've done to my own punches. Was punching some steel for drilling and started feeling tired. Ended up having a little sleep and never woke up. The found a fine piece of hardfacing had chipped off and penetrated his lung, it left little blood. After reading the story I destroyed all the pounches, hammers, and slag chippers I had made.

    If you want to make a hard wedge then use a mild grade of hardened steel like a bisalloy 80. Avoid the harder grades like the 400+ because they are just too brittle. Avoid hardfacing for the same reason, it's in the 400+ range. Very hard, but very brittle.

    Shaun
     
  10. super3

    super3 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    To each his own.

    I made a wedge for a friends splitter long ago out of AR400, has split 100s of cords, self sharpens the edge, no splintering, no cracks, no deaths. Used the same when I replaced mine.

    While there may be better choices of material to use this has worked for me.
     
  11. fields_mj

    fields_mj AboristSite Guru

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    Thanks for the info. I was just curious. Most of the wedges I see are made out of A36, which is just hot roll. I'd like to find a few drops of 1045 at a local weld shop, but I'll probably settle for some 1018.
     
  12. CRThomas

    CRThomas AboristSite Guru

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    Splitter

    My oldest splitter is 8 years old and have never sharpened it have not sharpened any of my splitters. Just let them wear out.
     
  13. Craig21901

    Craig21901 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Lucky for me I have a neighbor who offered to do the sharpening. Splitter wedge is sharper than ever before and I can't wait to test it out. Also, I finally learned how my neighbor keeps his legs so shiny and hair free!

    Grinding the TW-P1 - YouTube
     
  14. avalancher

    avalancher Arboristsite Raconteur

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    I used to sharpen my wedges also, razor sharp with an angle grinder and finish it off with a flap wheel on a die grinder until one day I got a pretty nasty cut from the thing. Split a nice chunk of oak, and half of it rolled on to the table. When I reached over to pull the half over, it rolled and smashed my elbow against the wedge, freshly sharpened. Nine stitches later at the kitchen table, I figured it would be the last time I would sharpen a wedge.

    If 35 tons aint going to push that dull wedge through a chunk of wood, sharpening it probably aint going to help it much in my opinion.
     
  15. Whitespider

    Whitespider Lost in the 50s

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    Large Bastard File... 'round a half-dozen times a year.
    If'n ya' split a lot of stringy stuff (like elm) a good sharp wedge does make a huge difference... lot fewer strings to cut with the hatchet.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  16. Craig21901

    Craig21901 ArboristSite Lurker

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    That's exactly why I decided it was time for a good sharpening. Spent 2 very frustrating and exhausting days this past winter splitting about 3 cords of elm. Not fun.
     
  17. greendohn

    greendohn firewood hack

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    You mean they need sharpened?

    Have never needed to sharpen mine. don't know what grade steel it's made from, it stays near razor sharp just pushin' thru the rounds..built in the 80's, no splits,cracks or deformities and has splits thousands of "ricks".
     

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