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Longwood Duel Fuel Furnace Mark VII Manual

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by iowa, Jun 1, 2009.

  1. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Does anyone have any experience with setting one of these up. Have a manual or anything. I just picked one up and it is like new. Maybe used a season or had a couple fires built in it. Maybe none. I don't know.

    UPDATE: I did a search and found someone on Bobvilla that had the manual. She had taken copies and sent me a PDF file on the entire manual for my exact furnace.

    I have been reading the manual and it is quite interesting. In order for the furnace to work correctly it requires 4-5 foot long pieces of wood. It said you can use slab wood but it needs to be mixed with some pole wood! But hardwoods are the best for burning as it "charcoals" up better. But anyways. It is a dualfuel furnace. Which I just thought that the propain-ng, or fuel oil burner was only used to light the wood or to heat the house when the wood supply was gone as a back-up. WRONG. This furnace is a 0 natural draft furnace. The dampner door is closed at all times, except when loading wood. Or burning only wood when the electricity goes out. The furnace is to use the propane burner to light the wood and keep it "charcoaled" up when you need heat. The coals stay hot and the flue piping stays a constant warm temp. The propane burner is to only run around 5min. to get the coals going and then it shuts off. There is a heat reclaimer just above the main firing chamber to reclaim some heat, but they said it shouldn't be run all the time. Only if it is overloaded and it is too hot.

    I didn't know that the propain HAD to be used on these units in order to work correctly! Now I'm kinda bummed because I want to use 0 propain during the winter months. I guess I'll get it hooked up and see how much propane it does use. It says that it is extremely effecient with the gas and that most of the heat is from the wood. But I'm guessing these units were made in the 80's? I looked at the serial number to see if something resembled a yr. made. The last 2 digits are 71. So that could be the yr. it was made I have no idea. All I know is it is heavy. Crate weight is 550lbs.

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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2009
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  2. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    UPDATE with pics !
     
  3. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Sounds like a deal.....

    Knowing a lot about multi fuel furnaces I can be of some help.
    I would say that you can manually light that wood .

    The only real bummer about that furnace is that there are no parts available.
    You could however like in the burners case put a new burner on it that is still made and has parts with technical service available.

    I also see the UL file number which is a good thing.
    As a matter of fact it is real close to ours....MH11057...it's only a few digits off.
    We started to make our furnces in "74".


    Well good luck....I hope she's a great wood burner for you.
     
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  4. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    All the parts are there I believe. Except for a few nuts and bolts. I hope the burner works on it also. I have reason to believe that this unit has never had a fire built in it. It has some rust on it from setting out in the environment the last 7 months. But the seller had always kept it indoors.
     
  5. Constrictor

    Constrictor ArboristSite Operative

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    Awwwww man quit foolin' around with those antiques and just get an EPA certified stove like a Englander NC30 and youll have no troubles, no propane, absolutely no smoke in the house ever, and use less wood! $800 brand new!
     
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  6. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Can that be hooked up in my basement and blow directly into my existing duct-work? Also will it heat 3000 sq ft house?
     
  7. Del_

    Del_ Tree Freak

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    It's a dead dinosaur! Send it to the scrap yard where it belongs.
     
  8. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    What's a dead dinosaur?
     
  9. Del_

    Del_ Tree Freak

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    That smoke dragon you are trying to resurrect.
     
  10. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It won't work in my house?
     
  11. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Easy guys....the guy got a deal....I do know at 1st issue there will be a struggle to find parts but even if it only ran a year the guy makes out.
    i do know that they were famous for burner issues due to the high burner placement sooting up.
    They also are called longwood because you needed long wood to fill the box to get the burn times you'll need to heat a 3000 s/f house.
    That furnace will do the job ,but you'll go through the wood like an OWB does or almost anyway.

    As to the "hey get this or that"

    A Yukon EagleI wood/oil or wood/gas is the only legal"code" furnace out there and the only true wood/gas that needs 1 flue.

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    Last edited: Jun 4, 2009
  12. Del_

    Del_ Tree Freak

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    Ever wonder why they went out of business?
     
  13. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That's not why they went out of business.
    There were many wood type furnaces that went out of business for 2 reasons.
    The 1st was that the oil embargo of the late 70's was over and oil got dirt cheap. ....who is willing to work for heat when oil was .50 a gallon?

    2nd The insurance companies were taking many hits on payouts due to unsafe installs.
    They told the dist.,contractor/retailer and homeowner that if they sold,installed or operated the insurance coverage was cancled.
    There really was no heating code to speak off. They went to the Feds for help who for the most part at the time took a hands off approach to how we heated our homes,but it became an issue which is why all states have a heating code....most have accepted the standard by N.F.P.A.

    We manged to survive by scaling back and since we have had Sears selling thousands of furnaces under their brand and the fact that Yukon Energy Corp also had thousands of furnaces out there ....parts business kept us afloat . Then add in a few furnaces every year and we made it through those tough times.


    Longwoods were very popular. I run into many that have gotten 20 years or better out of them.
    I've already mentioned the drawbacks.....
    To make a statement like that's why they went out of business is silly.
     
  14. iowa

    iowa Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My longwood will work just fine. I have a manual for it and will install it correctly and make sure all the settings are correct!
     
  15. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    If you ever need any advice you can call me.
     
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  16. Del_

    Del_ Tree Freak

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    Thanks for the correction. I was mistaken.


    I hope the EPA exemption of whole house wood furnaces comes to an end soon. Pardon my lack of enthusiasm concerning the installation of wood furnaces with antiquated combustion designs and efficiencies.
     
  17. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Hope ya think I was not personally slamming you TreeCo.

    As to EPA exemptions in the EPA 40/60 rule subpart AAA.

    Wood furnaces typically have way more heat exchangeabilty and are more efficient than those typical old style stoves that had no brick for thermal mass or some way of burning off the smoke creating more btus from that same pound of wood.

    I do agree that many wood furnaces are not as effcient as they could be.
    Being the American public did not request these types of heaters until just recently(150,000,000) went to some alternative heater last year.
    There was not the demand to drive the R & D departments to justify the expenditures.

    Smoke had never been an issue until about the last 10 years. Laws will not be made unless there is a public outcry or until it becomes an issue which it most certainly is right now with the cry of global warming and the emmisions created by the mass of OWBs that have been installed in this period.
    Mostly irresponsible burners in populated areas.

    I am proud to have represented a wood furnace manufaturer that has been the cadillac in the industry for over 30 years.
    We patented the "after burn " process in our furnaces as there was never anything like this in the early 70's when David Tjosovold came up with this idea so long ago.
    He also incorperated a massive heat exchanger to go into our furnaces knowing full well that you can make all of the heat possible , but if you can not exchange it into the ducting the heat will still go up the flue resulting in waisted heat...ie fuel.
    He also designed the furnace to have way thicker and more dense brick then what you would find in a typical wood furnace.
    David also realized that wood and coal does not need to burn as fast as a natural draft wants to burn these solid fuels. A typical draft speed in a decent well insulated flue is .08" of water column.
    Incorperating a barometric draft regulator will give you the ability to slow the draft to a point that you can still make all of the 8000-8700 btus when the solid fuel is 15-20% moisture content and at the same time stay above that 25o degree mark where flue gasses will want to condense.
    Slowing down and cycling draft speeds will also give the furnace more time to exchange those heats made.

    Longwood does this to some extent however there is no "after burn" which is where 30-40% of the available btus are made.

    Sorry for the derailing of this thread Iowa.
    I hope that I am at least being of some help explaining all of this.
    My advice Iowa is to match the flue to your smoke pipe outlet of the furnace.
    Install a draft regulator and set it to .03-.04" of water column.
    Burn well seasoned wood and make sure that you bring in make up air for combustion.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2009
  18. Del_

    Del_ Tree Freak

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    Well yes, I did take it as a person slam.

    .....and it was well deserved!:cheers:
     
  19. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Your a good egg!


    I guess one of the reasons Dave has me onboard is that I have this desire to teach and help others.
    Maybe that's why I enjoy guiding for fish too.
    Took a 7 year old boy from not wanting to be in a boat and bored to catching,holding & releasing panfish this last weekend. He did not want to stop at the end of the day....what a flame I lit!
    Here's the lil man holding his 1st slab.
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    Notice on his 5th fish he was holding them!...taking out his own hook too.
    [​IMG]

    I know that many folks are really struggling with their heating costs.
    I also know of a way to heat for cheap and be as warm as you want.
    What an oxymoron to be paying mega bucks for heat only to keep the house to 60 degrees.

    Even if you have to buy wood, you can still come way ahead by burning wood in an effcient furnace keeping your whole home warm and toasty.
    Load your furnace and pay yourself instead of the oil conglomerates!
    It's my mission to show others they do not have to be cold when they can heat with less wood then they thought they'd have to work to load .
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2009
  20. laynes69

    laynes69 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I agree. I decided to upgrade my woodfurnace this year to an epa model.
    I figured its a step towards the future of wood furnaces. Its cleaner for the environment, and less wood is always better! As long as people burn seasoned wood and burn it hot it helps in any woodfurnace. Its the people who burn green wood and smolder it to get the longest possible burn times are the ones not helping things. Unfortunately furnaces are expensive and many operate on a budget in todays society, so its hard to justify some upgrades. Hopefully things will improve with the woodfurnace industry in the future.
     

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