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Nashua wood stove

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Derik L, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. Derik L

    Derik L ArboristSite Lurker

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    I have acquired a nashua n24 wood stove. I just got it all set up an lit my first fire. I' cant find much info online about them. Does anyone have any tips or info. The little bit i did find is that they will produce a lot of heat and are close to industructable. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


    Thanks
     
  2. woodguy105

    woodguy105 AboristSite Guru

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    Hey Derik,

    I have the same nashua I think , judging from google pictures. 2 rotating vent controls on the bottom left and right, 3 hinge pin door and blower on back with exit vents on each side , kind off opaque window on the door? Our Nausha puts out great heat. No secondary combustion but it will give you a fairly clean burn once it heats up (with dry wood). We use it to heat the main part of our house old 1929 farm house (cold) when it gets really cold out.

    The stove was here when we bought the house 6 years ago, immediatly replaced one or two fire bricks and then door gasket a couple of times.

    Originally I started making big fires (huge stove compared to my LOPI answer) now I've learned that once heated up smaller fires work well and save on wood usage (it can blow through wood if you let it). I keep the window ( an opaque ceramic glass of some sort ) clean enough to see that there are flames and set the vents accordingly. When shes hot, the flames will be nice and long, which to me looks like a fairly clean burn.

    We dry laundry using the blower and it is awesome. The stove throws plenty of heat without the blower.

    We love taking the door off and using it like a fireplace when we have company...old timey.

    One thing I did after using it for awhile was to put a line of fire brick on the shelf inside the stove where the smoke exits the stove. For some reason it seemed like the opening was too big so I've been using it this way with no problems.

    My 8 inch stove pipe goes horizontally into a chimney that is way larger than 8 inches and it draws very very well.

    Enjoy! :clap:
     
  3. cheeves

    cheeves Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Derik, I can't believe you're in Bridgewater. I'm in Plymouth. Wife works in Taunton.

    A good friend of mine had a Nashua wood stove. He would have to open the windows in January it thru so much heat. He got killed by a drunk driver on 3A in Cedarville years ago. They are indistructible. I hope you have a big house. Nothing throws more heat, although my Allnighter that's up my father's barn is close. Later Bob
     
  4. Derik L

    Derik L ArboristSite Lurker

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    Woodguy,
    Stove sounds the same except mine doesn,t have glass in the door. I'm looking forward to really figuring it out and seeing what it will do when it gets cold.


    Bob
    We have friends in plymouth down by white cliffs and my wife seems to always end up at colony place.


    Derik
     
  5. stumpy75

    stumpy75 ArboristSite Operative

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    If it's the same stove(and I think it is), I had one as my 1st woodburner(mid 1970s). I had the smaller one though, and it had a solid door. Worked great for me, but was a little undersized for my house. In their ads, they put a stick of dynamite in the stove and let her rip to prove how well built they were! I do remember it was one big chunk of metal!
     
  6. woodguy105

    woodguy105 AboristSite Guru

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    I think it'll work out well for you. At first we used to use the blower, then realized it worked great(almost better) w/natural air movement. Tweeking the vents was the only learning curve. Trying to get good heat and not blow through too much wood.
     
  7. RedEyedRooster

    RedEyedRooster ArboristSite Lurker

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    Nashua

    We bought our home a few years ago and it has the same N24 Nashua wood stove. House was built in 1977 and the stove is 1978 I believe. Ours is in our finished basement and the blower tubes that come out each side are connected to the duct system for the propane heater and central air. We have a 500 gallon propane tank for our 2700 square foot house. The most gas I've used in a year was 45%. We use the propane in the spring and fall when we don't really want a fire. With this stove we can heat our home to the point that were sweating in February. I'll put on a couple round logs about 10:30PM, wake around 5:00AM and the house has never gotten below 65 degrees at even the coldest of winters. I did some searching a few years ago about this stove one of the advertisements in the 1970's was to put a stick of dynamite in the stove set it off and the stove stayed intact. I think they stopped making the stoves in the early 1980's or late 1970's if I remember right. I keep 13 wood racks full that measure 4X10 ft but I burn about 6 to 7 ric in a winter. I'd use less if I had my wood covered, which will happen eventually, used all good hard wood and regulated my door vents better. Theirs 45 acres of woods across the road that I take what mother nature gives me. (trees that get blown over or top get snapped off) Friends always want to give me wood, just have to go get it, cut it up and split it. This spring I'll buy a splitter and over next summer get a permanent covering put over the wood racks. We just are amazed at the money we've saved after living before in a 1500 square foot old farm house that had a 1000 gallon propane tank that we filled about 3 times a winter and we all had blankets we all had sweats, sweat shirts and always wore socks just to stay warm. Now were running around in February in tee shirts, boxers and bare foot. All that money saved justified buying a Stihl MS360 :chainsawguy:, a 16ft car hauler, and a 1976 Ford F250 highboy for a wood hauler (at least that's what I told my wife) :msp_thumbsup:. Believe you'll love :heart: that Nashua N24 wood stove, we do ours. I'm retighting the armature on the original blower motor today mater of fact. Glass door would be nice. :cheers:
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011

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