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Reliability: Husky vs. Stihl

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Joggerjack, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. Joggerjack

    Joggerjack ArboristSite Lurker

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    Which is better built in terms of reliability and longevity, Stihl or Orange.

    Usually I get 2 years out of a husky, doing maybe on average 3 hours saw time per work day. I usually get 55 to 70 cc models, been using a lot of 357XP. One only lasted 6 months and burned out the piston ring due to an air leak. That pissed me off and is making me think of going Stihl. How do the Stihl rack up for durability compared to Orange?
     
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  2. Peacock

    Peacock Addicted to ArboristSite

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    This is sure to be an interesting thread!:givebeer:

    However, in my area and experience it seems that Stihl's tend to be a bit more durable. Both will last a long time with the proper maintenance but the Stihl's seem a bit more tolerant of abuse and lack of maintenance.
     
  3. Erick

    Erick Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yeah...... what he said. :cheers:

    :laugh:
     
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  4. Ole Farmerbuck

    Ole Farmerbuck Addicted to ArboristSite

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    They will burn up too if leaking air!! Warranty is 2 years with husky. Get it replaced.
     
  5. belgian

    belgian Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Simple answer : go Stihl !;)
     
  6. Cliff R

    Cliff R Addicted to ArboristSite

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    With new saws, the EPA is probably their worst enemy. We find that we have to add quite a bit of fuel across the speed/load range for the vast majority of the saws that we service.

    I also see WAY to many saws with burnt pistons/jugs, regardless who the manufacturer is. I know that all of the Echo saws we own would have suffered a quick and miserable death if we didn't pull off the limiter caps and give them some fuel right from day one.

    Both Husky and Stihl make some "low end" products. I'm working on a Husky 142 in the shop right now, and right on the label it states that the engine life expectancy is 50 hours. It looks and smells like a Poulan, but I could be wrong?

    I think I put 50 hours on my Husky 480CD, the first month I owned it. After 28 years and a couple of zillion hours, it starts and runs as good as, if not better than the day I bought it! I have ALWAYS ran premium fuel in it, from Amoco or BP. I also add a tad bit of extra oil to the mix, closer to 40 to 1 than 50 to 1, and use Husquvarna Premium 2 cycle oil.

    Well, it may not quite have a zillion hours on it, but it sure has been used a LOT in my lifetime.

    Anyhow, your question is difficult to answer specifically, as Stihl and Husky make some very good products. Over the years I've had excellent experiences from both lines. The Husky's I've owned cut a tad faster, the Stihls seem to "grunt" a bit better, both have provided me with excellent service in terms of durability......Cliff
     
  7. Ole Farmerbuck

    Ole Farmerbuck Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Good post Cliff.
     
  8. maccall

    maccall AboristSite Guru

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    That 50 hours is not "expected lifetime", but how many hours it's guaranteed to comply with whatever emission restrictions it's confessing to.

    The 142, however, is assembled by Poulan, with no extended quality expectation just for it's Husqvarna badge, and therefor the "expected lifetime" might co-incidentially just be the same...
     
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  9. 2000ssm6

    2000ssm6 Stihl User

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    I have asked quite a few of the pros/loggers and saw buliders this same question. Most of the builders said if you want to race, go husky. If you want to work, go Stihl. The pros say the Stihls hold up better in a work enviroment. I choose Stihl, I don't race but use mine to work.
     
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  10. czar800

    czar800 ArboristSite Operative

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    +1
     
  11. Joggerjack

    Joggerjack ArboristSite Lurker

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    There was no reason a new saw should have an air leak like that. It was just shoddy manufacturing. They should really know better, it's just wrong. You blow a jug and it costs half as much to fix as a new saw unless you do the job yourself and I don't have a shop for that. Ill go with Stihl on my saws for this year. I usually get 3 or 4 a season, the Husky guy will miss me but he won't mind he sells 1000 Deer tractors a year. The season ends with the mud and starts again in June, right now I'm out for a week due to injury.

    I'll go Stihl nhis year and get one big green John Deer chainsaw from the Husky guy just to say hello, and I buy my skidders from him, always John Deer and always new, no used equipment, got 3 skidders right now, one is 30 years old still works almost every day.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2008
  12. nikocker

    nikocker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Wow!

    Look that's why they have warranties!!!!! You said it crapped out in 6 months? Why didn't you take it back to the dealer????

    OK just edited 'cuz I read your profile and see you are a logger . . . only 90 day warranty. Never mind!

    Al :dizzy: :dizzy:
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2008
  13. romeo

    romeo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    They are the same. When you get down to it they have seals, gaskets, piston rings, bearings, cdi's, hoses, carbs, etc. that are made by the same companies anyway.

    So which is less reliable?????? a Mahle or a Mahle:laugh:

    The biggest problem with either brand is usually the abusive owners. I have seen bigger reliability issues between different models than different brands.
     
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  14. THALL10326

    THALL10326 The Champ

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    Durn Jack if that saw had a air leak chances are real good it was over reving at full throttle and not idling worth a hoot. Being 6 months old its still under warranty I think, raise a little hell and makem fix it.

    Far as which is better, Stihl or Husky, for work saws, tant but one way to find out.
     
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  15. Ray Bennett

    Ray Bennett AboristSite Guru

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    I think The stihl's are built a little tougher But I can tell ya My buddy loggs full time with huskeys and runs his saw 6 to 8 hours a day 5 days a week and his 395's last him 2 years then he replaces the rings and sells them as good running saws. If you are having that much trouble you either need to do better maintnence or buy better bigger saws like the 372 if you want to stay with huskey or a 460 stihl if you are ready for a change. Sometimes spending twice as much on a saw will save you 3 or 4 times the money in the long run. Now if you are using bad gas and have dirty filters you will blow any saw.
     
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  16. Hugenpoet

    Hugenpoet Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Very well said.
     
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  17. HUSKYMAN

    HUSKYMAN Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Exactly.

    The new Stihls are built just like Huqvarna's. They run just as many rpms, have just as much plastic, and run just as lean.

    While its true the old Stihls like the 056 and 038 and 08 run forever, the fact is Stihls are not made that way anymore. All the professional saws are made the same nowadays
     
  18. HUSKYMAN

    HUSKYMAN Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Two years is about the average life span for a saw ran full time every day. Loggers running Stihls get the same life span
     
  19. cuttinscott

    cuttinscott Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Where abouts in the Adirondacks are you. I have had excellent reliability with the DOLMAR line of chain saws you might want to look me up and take a ride to Greenwich. Dolmar is the OLDEST GAS Chain saw manufacture in the world they are GERMAN saws and have a excellent rep.

    Scott
     
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  20. Peacock

    Peacock Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I agree to an extent.

    The newer Stihl pro saws are still built a bit heavier than Husky's. The crankcase is a bit thicker not to mention the mag starter cover.
     

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