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Saving a tree trunk

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by oaktreeguy, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. oaktreeguy

    oaktreeguy ArboristSite Lurker

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    Hi, I have access to cut down a 36" diameter maple trunk. The top broke off in a storm a year ago. I'd like to take the stump down before it goes bad. But I don't have a way to mill it now.

    If I cut it down (about 10' long), move it under a roof, and coat the ends with paint, should I expect it to check and split, or stay good for a few years?

    Thanks!
     
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  2. oaktreeguy

    oaktreeguy ArboristSite Lurker

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    PS I am hoping to slab the tree into 12/4 for a large table. What would you expect to charge for someone to slab this trunk up?
     
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  3. Big_6

    Big_6 ArboristSite Member

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    Build a chainsaw mill and diy.
    I am...
     
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  4. oaktreeguy

    oaktreeguy ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thanks,I looked at that but big saws are $1k and not in the budget right now for occasional use. So thinking of falling the tree and saving the trunk whole.
     
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  5. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Coating ends as soon as cut best plan. Look thru csm home made setups & you will see how to set one up inexpensively for your own use. I use Skip chain to extend my saws ability to cut.
    After a couple weeks recoat ends of log. The idea is to even out the rate of drying throughout log so shrinkage is even as posible. I think a part of that is to open the flats of the planks cut to the air for moisture transfer.(just my thgoughts how this works)So with that in mind IMHO milling that log to rough thickness soon would be better than later. Your mileage may vary.
    I've found a couple 4 foot logs up to 41" dia. with 1/2" rebar thru the pith end to end. On public yard waste disposal site. Rebar keeps firewood seakers away from it while I sharpen chains to work above 'n below(-;
     
  6. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    If you keep an eye on the trading post a saw of large enough displacement you can afford will show up. A little patience will pay off.
    M avatar shows off the largest cut I've made with my ms-460 (70cc range) with 5 foot bar ,56" cut. I used that powerhead with 42" bar to make 13 slices most 37" x 100" long by using skip chain & a free breathing well tuned saw (-; Same set up I'll use at the yard waste site mentioned earlier Safe milling.
     
  7. oaktreeguy

    oaktreeguy ArboristSite Lurker

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    Has anyone successfully saved an entire 3-foot tree trunk? Or will the drying on the outside of a block of wood that large induce checking no matter if the ends are sealed?

    Thanks
     
  8. JTM

    JTM ArboristSite Operative

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    IMG_0731.JPG I had some trees come down in 2012 in north west Alabama. Had a guy come out with a portable Lucas. Was definitely worth it. My father in law made this table for my daughters wedding present.
     
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  9. kimosawboy

    kimosawboy ArboristSite Operative

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    Cut the stump/coat the ends/ raise off ground and cover with some tin, leave outside till you want to cut it...depending on the wood and where you are you should have about a %75 chance of no cracks....
    Some of the wood I mill in the bush has been down for more than a few years and is still in great shape with no cracks...... its all about how quickly you remove the moisture.

    G Vavra
     
  10. Mike Van

    Mike Van Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Maple is one of the hardest logs to 'save' Bacteria goes after the sugar in it, it quickly goes spalted, then punky not long after. If I had a choice, i'd mill that log as soon as it hit the ground.
     

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