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Seeking advice regarding thinning chainsaw

Discussion in 'Forestry and Logging Forum' started by Clark10, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. Ryan'smilling

    Ryan'smilling ArboristSite Guru

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    I'm not 100% sure what your recommendation is here. Just wanted clarify that I haven't seen anyone recommend the Dolmar 6400, which is heavy for a 60cc saw. I have seen a recommendation of the 6100, which I'd a new model and more inline with 60cc saws.
     
  2. svk

    svk Firewood and Saw Collector

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    With the multitude of other saws in that space, I don't think anyone would recommend a 6400 for anything other than a donor to convert to 7900 if the price was right.
     
    bryanr2, Big Block and Ryan'smilling like this.
  3. Cycledude

    Cycledude ArboristSite Operative

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    my local Husqvarna dealer used to sell Dolmar, very few were ever sold then they started selling Husqvarna and sales skyrocketed so much that they dropped Dolmar.
     
  4. M.R.

    M.R. ArboristSite Operative

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    Ryan...
    I do favor the Dolmars.. Although not up on every
    current saw coming out... I do have a NIB 6400 to convert
    someday. .. The old Ford - Chevy thing... for me they've
    been the Honda of chainsaws... I've liked & still use a
    026 & 064 woods ported but... put pehaps 25% of the time
    on these two as I do the Dolmars, yet the maintenance cost
    Is higher.. mostly fuel lines, it seems like anytime the
    price of crude went up the rubber quality in these fuel lines
    went down. The only Huskys I've used regularly are a top handle (loud sob too) for climbing & a pole saw.
     
  5. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water Staff Member

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    I'm also a forester in WA, and all of the crews I know use 70cc+ saws for everything. 440/460/660 Stihls are giving way to 461/661 Stihls, and the Husky guys are keeping their 372's alive and haven't switched to 576's just yet. Everybody loves the 390. Bar lengths vary from 28" to 36" with 32" being the most commmon. My primary saw at work for everything from clearing roads to cutting hazard trees on fires is a MS440 wearing a 28", though I have a 460 and a 660 available. I'm just a little guy, I need a little saw.

    Also: gonna move this to F&L
     
  6. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    Well I am 39 and have broken more bones then I care to think about am 40 poinds overweight have 2 bad shoulders arthritis in knees and hips

    And my daily use saw is a 461, cause it gets the job done.

    On some jobs i drag an 066 around with a 36 or 42" bar. And its not always up to the task.

    45 in fair condition is nearly a 20 yr old in these woods.

    50cc saws are for trimming the rose bushes or whittling fire wood.
     
    Westboastfaller, slowp and hseII like this.
  7. slowp

    slowp Tree Freak

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    On the part about running a big saw all day, some of us girls have run an old heavy Mac on a precommercial thinning crew--got paid for it and that model of saw was of similar weight to our modern day 440s and 460s. It just took a week of painful muscles and then all was well. One gets used to it or one finds another line of work.
     
  8. Clark10

    Clark10 ArboristSite Lurker

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    I have been working for the last few days on another project and just came back to the forums. Thank you all for the great opinions, suggestions, and sage advice.

    A little more information for some of the poster's questions. I'm working for a private land owner to clean up several small reproduction plantings that are crowded as this is the first thin and they haven't been managed. Stand is mostly in the 12"-18" diameter range with 5-10% standing dead trees that are 8" more or less. I'm not doing commercial thinning on large stands that have well managed trees like the picture "slowp" posted. The standing dead and small stuff will be left within the managed area and the larger live logs will be pulled for firewood. This is a very part time job.

    I appreciate the post being switched to a different forum as it provided some good insights. I now have even more to think about. :reading:

    Thanks everyone.
     
    7sleeper likes this.
  9. slowp

    slowp Tree Freak

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    Are the trees limb locked? I tried to open up a group of trees but they were so thick that we had to hook up a .....tractor to pull them over. Small trees don't have enough weight to tumble through a thick canopy, nor do they have much room to stick a wedge in and work them around. But they are big enough to kill or hurt you.
     
  10. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water Staff Member

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    I ran a S-212 class (wildland fire chainsaw operations) this year in a stand like that. To make a big enough hole to throw stems down in, I had to drive three together and then winch them down with the Lewis winch. After that we just put them down into the hole. In the end the hole we made was about 1/2 acre, enough for a class but not enough to qualify as a proper thin. Little trees are a PITA.
     
    northmanlogging likes this.
  11. slowp

    slowp Tree Freak

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    One of the few that I was able to hit the ground with. I cut with the Barbie Saw--a 440 with 28 inch bar which my neighbor says is not a safe saw to fall with. I think having a fence where the tree had to go helped to get it on the ground. It's the tractor beams.

    day 40001_3.JPG
     
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  12. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water Staff Member

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    LOL @ "tractor beams"
     
  13. Clark10

    Clark10 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Here are some images of the area that I'm working in now. I'll also include an image of a truck with a load that would look a lot like what I would be taking out of this area if I were doing so right now. Dogs may give some perspective. By the way, the German Shepherd Dog is 105lbs and is taller and bigger than most people have seen. The McNab is less than half his size but 2 times faster. :)


    Lot2W1.jpg Lot1NE1.jpg Lot1SW1.jpg Lot1TruckExample.jpg
     
  14. 7sleeper

    7sleeper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Those trees are average? Max. 50cc all the way. Your 55, in good maintenance condition, will laugh at the work and give you a few years of problem free cutting time in that type of trees.

    Btw nice dogs! Look like great companions!

    7
     
  15. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    Dear everyone that suggests a 50cc saw,

    Go out and fall timber for an entire day, don't cut any firewood, just limb and buck to 30-36' lengths with yer hedge trimmer.

    Then if you don't already own one, the very next day, go rent a 64-80cc saw with a bar that will cut this timber.

    At the end of the day, tally up your progress.

    The extra 5-10 pounds of saw is going to be worth it, and after just a few days you won't really notice the weight difference.


    I said it before, I'll say it again, this isn't fire wood or stump carving, falling timber means you need to have horse power on your team, and 50cc saws are not meant to fall timber regularly, they will do it, but you will work 3 times as hard for the same amount of production.
     
    JimMorrison, bitzer and slowp like this.
  16. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    As far as Dolmar/sachs/poulan/jonesared/echo/shindowa

    Sachs/Dolmar are damned good saws but dealer support is next to null

    Same goes for Jonesared, Can't think of any dealers on the west coast

    The rest, Echo is ok... wouldn't touch anything else... new homelights,poulan,McCullach pretty much all garbage.
     
  17. madhatte

    madhatte It's The Water Staff Member

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    Get a bar that's long enough that standing up, when you drop the tip on the ground, it hits a foot or so in front of your feet. For me, that's 28", which is the bar length I use the most on all saw models. Your mileage may vary. The idea is to bend less, and not hit your feet or legs. It really is only a pound or more of weight. The decrease in bending is important.

    Also -- Jred parts mostly cross-reference with Husky, but if your dealer isn't a Jred dealer, you're probably going to have to do a bit of homework.
     
  18. woodfarmer

    woodfarmer ArboristSite Guru

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    I typically cut large beech and maple in the 18"-30" dia. I usually use jonsered 2165,2171 or Stihl 460 or 066. The bigger the tree, the larger the saw. However today I was cutting 10" cedar trees with the jonsered 2150. The saw wasn't the issue (although I could see how using my 2159 or 2171 would definitely speed things up) it was that every damn tree got hung up, what a pita. I'm used to big trees that go down with a boom. I don't cut for production, just manage our own private woodlots, but I can see why you'd want an excavator beside every tree.
     
  19. bitzer

    bitzer Bullshit Timber Expert

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    I couldn't have said it better myself. A bigger saw cuts more wood period. That means money to me.
     
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  20. bryanr2

    bryanr2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Wow. Never have heard of a McNab Cattle Dog before today, and I am a true "dog man." I know dog breeds like our resident gurus here know saws.

    On your saw decision, Id go with what I have avail as far as dealers close by. Id look close at the 562xp and 555. Hotsaws101 has videos on youtube of 562xp with a 30'' bar on it.






     

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