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Spruce vs Fir Lumber

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by czeigler, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. czeigler

    czeigler ArboristSite Operative

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    Is there much difference between the two grade wise???
     
  2. Burvol

    Burvol Bullbuck

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    If you speak of good old west coast Doug Fir, night and day. White Fir varieties are probably about the same if not a little worse.
     
  3. czeigler

    czeigler ArboristSite Operative

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    Nope, just the Good ole' Eastern Trees here.

    I just got called from a local golfcourse (Which i have been on a list to get called) to come pick up roughly 22 logs which are anywhere from 10" diameter to 30" and are a mixture of Spruce and Fir.

    They are FREE (can't complain there!). But i have never milled any.
    Only white pine and hemlock. Everything thing else we milled has been Hardwoods.

    Just wondering if anyone has milled some and what they used it for:

    2x's, 4x's, boards, etc...
     
  4. MJR

    MJR AboristSite Guru

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    Last summer I milled some Norway Spruce for framing lumber. It was used in my hunting camp. It was very easy to work with. Some sap issues with the band blade and bunks. I cut the trees in May. I would take free trees in a heart beat. It will not spilt like Hemlock or give you as much slivers as Hemlock. I did not notice much difference with it and Red pine. Good luck.
     
  5. Burvol

    Burvol Bullbuck

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    White wood is ok to frame with, and use verticle. Lacks load bearing weight horizontally.
     
  6. DRB

    DRB ArboristSite Operative

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    Out here on the west coast the lumber designation SPF refers to all Spruce species (except sitka spruce), Lodgepole Pine, Alpine & Balsam Fir. I would think that what you are getting could be used the same as SPF.

    I would use it for framing lumber. Nice to work with, holds nails well, light, strong its what all houses around here are made from.

    Be sure to keep it dry as it does seem to rot fairly quickly.

    I would mill it.
     
  7. BIG JAKE

    BIG JAKE AboristSite Guru

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    When I was building my house, I was going to use a Laminated beam to support 24 ft of roof over a porch. I found that an 8X12X24ft #1 grade douglas fir beam would handle the same load at 1/3 less cost to the lam. The beam has been in place for 13 years now with no perceptable deflection. There was some twisting, but that's the way trees are. In short, the doug fir handles loads well-can't tell you about spruce.
     
  8. DRB

    DRB ArboristSite Operative

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    Doug Fir is a different species than Balsam or Alpine Fir and is graded differently. Doug fir has a higher span rating than Spruce or Fir. SPF still makes great framing lumber as it is lighter & easier to nail.
     
  9. czeigler

    czeigler ArboristSite Operative

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    Thursday's Work!

    Here are some of the logs we brought home on Thursday. Only had enough time to pick up 1 loads worth after work. Still have about 20 logs to pick up yet.

    :cheers:
     

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