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Square filing. Who has tried, and given up?

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by redprospector, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There used to be a lot of talk about square filing on here. Lately there hasn't been much, so I was wondering how many have tried and given up, and how many have been successful in learning to file this way.

    Andy
     
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  2. wvlogger

    wvlogger Rock trucker

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    I think i could if I would try but the 1 time i did try I failed. No were near as easy to learn as round filing
     
  3. J.W Younger

    J.W Younger Tree Freak

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    I am still square filing. Geting better and faster at it all the time.
    Have you ever filed any .325
    Oregon lpx .325 actually has little side beaks on it out of the box (like square filed low)and cuts well before filing but a 3/16 file blunts this.
    A few sharpenings with a goofy and its close to square but the tie links do a number on the file.
    The double bevel is a little narrower tho and thats what I'm using now on both the .325 and the 3/8.
    Anyway just letting you know I havent given up.
    Thanks Jerry
     
  4. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    I got half way decent at it and then haven't done it in 4 months. I need to get the 2 chains I've got out and use them some.
     
  5. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I know it's not for everyone, and it's not as easy as learning to round file but in my opinion once you learn to file this way and when to touch up it is no more difficult to maintain than a round filed chain.
    My main reason for this thread was to encourage those who want to learn.

    Andy
     
  6. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    I might go take a picture or 2 of what I done last time I was sharpening and see what you think.
     
  7. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Good deal, I'm glad you're still working at it and seeing good results. :cheers:
    I tried it on .325 a long time ago, but just once. Everything I've got is set up for 3/8" except for my bike saw and it's .404. For me keeping everything set up for 3/8" chain just simplifies everything.

    Andy
     
  8. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yeah, that would be good. We all like pictures.

    Andy
     
  9. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    Here's one I'm uploading some more. This chain was sent to Teddyscout with a 28" rw bar. I never asked him if it cut good.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Here's an old picture of a cutter I filed. The angle of the top plate could have been a little steeper for all around cutting, but I was cutting good clean Ponderosa pine at the time and this angle will cut a little faster in clean pine.
    The best angle for all around would put the corner line from the working corner (outside corner) to the inside corner of the cutter.

    [​IMG]

    Andy
     
  11. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    Here's a few more.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It's hard to tell from the pic but it looks like you might be a little high in the working corner of the cutter. There should be a definate line left from the corner of the file. Optimality for all around cutting that line should go from the outside corner of the cutter to the inside corner of the cutter.
    But it looks like you were off to a good start. I think you should dig those chains out and keep going. :cheers:

    One way to tell if you're getting a little high in the corner with the file is if the top cutting edge develops a curve. If you're too high the edge on the top plate won't be straight.

    Andy
     
  13. Metals406

    Metals406 Granfodder Runningsaw

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    I'm still filing square. . . And bought a square grinder that I have yet to setup.

    I prefer square to round. . . A LOT!

    I just don't like paying $10.00 a file for square. :(
     
  14. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    In the second picture you posted I can see that you are definately a little high in the working corner. Get the file to match exactly in the working corner and you will see a definate improvement. The gullet is also on the verge of needing to be cleaned out with a round file. All in all it looks like you are doing pretty good.
    It's hard to teach this without doing it in person, and even harder to learn it that way. My hat's off to you for putting in the effort. :cheers:

    Andy
     
  15. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    I really tried to not get that curve. I have a few teeth that are shorter than the others from having to get that out. If anything I usually end up with a little side beak. It's hard for me to use it a lot as most of the wood I'm cutting is on the ground or has been dragged in the dirt. The gullet on that chain does need cleaning the next time I sharpen it. That chain is the 20" for playing in clean wood when I get a chance. I have some semi skip in 28" that I've used bucking firewood. They aren't as good as that one as I hit something in a piece of wood.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2010
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  16. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yeah, the price of files has gone nut's. I remember griping about paying $3.85 for a Pferd 8" goofy file. I wish they were that price again.
    I've got a Silvey swing arm grinder that a friend gave me. I used it yesterday on one chain. But I'm still at the point that I can file them better and faster than I can grind them.

    Andy
     
  17. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    I was hoping someone in the PNW would find me a $100 square grinder. I've almost spent that much in files to get decent at it.
     
  18. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    With a "side beak" it will usually cut like mad, but just for a short time because there is nothing to support the cutting edge of the top plate and it will wear down quickly. It just takes a lot of practice (just doing it). Then it becomes muscle memory & eyesight.

    Andy
     
  19. mdavlee

    mdavlee Tree Freak

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    Yeah at first I was getting a lot of side beaks. It cut great for a couple cuts and then a big oak knot would peel the top of the cutter off. On the last couple chains I really got a lot better and they were sharp a lot longer. If i had time to cut a lot more I would get some more practice. I've only got to cut 2 times in the last 2 months.
     
  20. redprospector

    redprospector Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yeah, it sux when you don't get to use it much, makes the learning process take that much longer.
    When I first started filing square I was falling for a mill here. An old timer took me under his wing and taught me. One of his rules for teaching me was that if he caught me with a round filed chain on my saw before I had mastered the square, he was through teaching. If all you do is square file it dosen't take near as long to master it.

    Andy
     

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