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Strange Sthil intake manifold gasket

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by blairbuc, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. blairbuc

    blairbuc ArboristSite Lurker

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    My new Carb is coming in the mail.
    I don't see a traditional gasket to join the face of the carb to the inlet manifold on this Sthil 026 or should I say, what I call a gasket that I would cut out from a sheet from NAPA appears to be a much large black rubber sort of gasket at the point where carb meets intake port. Does this big rubber looking gasket need to be replaced or will it reseal the new carb from intake leaks? Sthil calls this big rubber looking gasket a "washer" in my 024-026 Sthil Manual at the top of page 52.

    Next, inside the inlet port itself they have something called ' a sleeve'. I have never seen ' a sleeve' that is slide inside the bore of an inlet port. The closest thing I've seen to this is what they call a ' reed valve'. Anyone have a clue on this ' sleeve' and do I need to replace the ' washer' when the new carb comes in?

    Is it just me? I must be getting old. I guess I'll throw my sheet of gasket material away for when I use to simply cut out a new gasket from the outline of the old gasket. I've never even heard the term 'washer' at the point where the carb attaches to the inlet hole on the jug.

    Blair
     
  2. pioneerguy600

    pioneerguy600 Tree Freak

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    The Stihl 026 uses a rubber boot to connect the carb to the cylinder, no gasket needed, the sleeve is a metal ring that inserts into the boot to prevent it from collapsing. No need to replace anything if the boot is in good shape.

    Pioneerguy600
     
  3. blairbuc

    blairbuc ArboristSite Lurker

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    thanks for saving me again, PioneerGuy.

    My old carb of 21 years died from ethanol in the gas and for some dumb reason, I put the saw away - didn't drain it- didn't fog the carb -just forgot and now I'm paying. My Carb is deader than dead. Gaskets as stiff as carboard which killed the fuel pumping flaps - so no ability to draw the fuel into the carb until new soft flexible parts are replacing what the ethanol turned to stiff cardboard.

    Talked to a chemist who said I'm going to trash my new carb and build carbon like to the point of choking the engine after 300 hours if I don't switch away from 87 octain which is a carbon builder along with the ethanol .....told me to go to 89 or Premium and start using ' Ethanol Shield'.

    He claims the Ethanol Shield does something Stabil or Star-Brite or SeaFoam won't do. Claims the Ethanol Shield encapsulates the ethanol at the molecular level. Eats the carbon out of the combustion chamber slowly ( about 100 hours) allows our two stoke motor oil to mix better with the gas. He then said without Ethanol Shield we are not getting the best lub out of our 2 stroke premix and this magic snake oil stops the ethanol from absorbing moisture. Don't know about you, but all of CT is ethanol 10% gas with 15% on it's way. This ehtanol gas turns to crap in about 30 days and who knows how long it's been in the stations bulk tank.

    Anyone know anthing about Ethanol Shield ?

    Blair
     
  4. pioneerguy600

    pioneerguy600 Tree Freak

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    That ethanol laced gasoline is sure causing lots of problems with carbs and fuel lines, we don`t have that problem here yet. Three year old fuel in a saw will still start up and run quite well but recently the gasoline at the pump has started to smell a little different. Let us know how the new fuel treatment works out for you.
    Pioneerguy600
     

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