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Timberframe Barn build

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by jimdad07, Nov 22, 2016.

  1. ValleyFirewood

    ValleyFirewood Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Why not use a chainsaw to cut the notches? That's what I've done anyhow. Might be +- 1/4" or so, but it's normally not overly fussy on big beams.
     
  2. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I tried a chainsaw for the first big scarf joint and wasn't happy with it at all. I've noticed that the more accurate my joinery is, the easier it goes together. I do those on the sawmill most of the time but was showing how most do it as a general practice.

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  3. ValleyFirewood

    ValleyFirewood Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I have an attachment that puts a 16" bar on a mag 77 style skill saw, I bet that would work?
     
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  4. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I have a Prazi on a Makita, it worked decently but I found I had a lot of cleanup from tearout.

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  5. ValleyFirewood

    ValleyFirewood Addicted to ArboristSite

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    How about a portaband?
     
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  6. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Now that would be something. They make one big enough just for this work. That would be a tool to have.

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  7. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Some more barn work, sorry about the lack of explanation on this one, the wind was blowing pretty hard that day.



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  8. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Finally putting up a bent, the camera was rolling.



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  9. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Working on the last tie beam!!! Makes me happy to say that.



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  10. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Here's part two of the scarf joint layout. I'm uploading part 3 right now which is the cutting of the joint.



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  11. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Here we go, cutting the scarf joint. Last tie beam of the project...very excited about it.



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  12. Marshy

    Marshy 285 Killa

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    @jimdad07, you are doing a fine job. I've watched a few of your videos and they have inspired me to give timber framing a try. I'm going to mill up some cants of poplar and hopefully build a lean-to before this winter. Yeah, not the most ideal material but it's abundant, straight and available. I have a friend that is going to lend me his chain mortiser and give me some other tips. I figured a lean-to wood shed would be a good first project to cut my teeth on.
     
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  13. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You won't regret it Marshy.

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  14. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    BTW, poplar is just fine for timber framing. The engineering values are very close to white pine. I would leave them in log form until you are ready to use them though.

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  15. Marshy

    Marshy 285 Killa

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    Thanks for the tip. I found some neighbors that have a few trees that were taken down within the past year and the logs we're left behind. One is a big poplar log and two are white pine.
     
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  16. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You're not too far from me I think. If you ever want to line up a time at some point to look my project over to get some ideas, let me know.

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  17. Mad Professor

    Mad Professor Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Jim is doing great work and I'm envious of the equipment he has at his disposal.

    Outbuildings like sheds are a great way to learn. You'll want to get the minimal tools handy in advance. Old chisels can often be renewed to working condition and sometimes you can find them at tag sales and auctions. Same with crosscut saws. An option to a chainmortiser is a hand boring machine, look for a millers, boss, or swan. They are also handy to just bore holes. You'll want to learn the different styles of layout of joinery, and have the tools for that also. Also learn about milling timbers, it's a little different than boards.

    Most people are ignorant of the old ways of layout and the fact the the joinery and accuracy is not rivaled by anything new they have come up with today. All you need for layout is dividers, chalk line, pumb bob, and how to use the divider to do your geometry. The same with tools. It makes me cringe when I hear people talk of using a chainsaw to cut a tennon.

    I got to learn a little from an old master about scribe rule framing layout, sometimes on a napkin sitting on a barstool on Friday night. My first "frame" was just a wood rack of 4 X 4" ash I milled for my house. I "cheated" on the 4 X 4" as those were not hewn, but did all the layout with dividers, chalk line, pumb bob. Tools were hand saws, chisels, and hand brace. Here is how to layout a brace and a post/tie beam using dividers. The "star of David" on the beams takes addition scribes not shown but makes things perfectly square even from irregular timbers.

    Jim also is posting this project on the foresty forum timberframing forum. There are great resources there ( like Jim's thread and pics/videos) and friendly folks too. Another good resources is the timberframing guild. The guild has great PDFs of traditional joinery of historic structures

    I look forward to watch the barn go up Jim!!!
     
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  18. Mad Professor

    Mad Professor Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The layouts for brace and beams/ties did not load last post. Explanation of these:

    For the "star of David" on the posts and ties it is laid out off the centerline chalk line. You make three consecutive circles off the centerline that intersect. The center of the first and last circles are the two points that the second circle intersect the center chalkline. You then connect the points where each pair of circles intersect, then connect the intersects to the center of the center of the other circle, to give two overlapping triangles; the "Star of David". This star gives perfect and square reference lines to square an end of timber or to locate a perfectly parallel mortise housing. Note that this will work with bowed or irregular timbers as the center chalkline is the reference.

    For the braces everything is laid out from a circle the depth of the brace. The triangles drawn are laid out using additional circles off the center chalkline. Again perfectly square, perfect brace angles, and no need to measure the length of your brace other than "walking your divider" down the center chalkline. You can use irregular or curved brace stock. You do have to use the divider again to locate the mortices in posts or beams if you layout your braces this way; but you don't need a square, tape, or Pythagorus.

    Old barns and houses had the master reference circles scribed concentrically into a beam to use as reference in the building layout or for future repairs

    brace layout2(1) copy.jpg post and tie-1(1) copy.jpg
     
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  19. furick1

    furick1 ArboristSite Lurker

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    You should start a fund online where people can contribute $ to your project. It’s great watching the progress and seeing your son in a video was special because traditions like this should be passed down.
     
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  20. jimdad07

    jimdad07 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Mad Professor that is great information. That's a new one to me. As for the TF Guild they are an excellent resource. I went to a TF Guild raising this past weekend, it was great and so we're the people.


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