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011 avt - pouring oil and carb adjustments

teco

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good day all,

I have an older 011 avt that I am working on right now.

My knowledge on chainsaws is limited at this point but am quite passionate about these things and decided that the best way to learn about them was to get my hands dirty and working on them.

The Oiler was not working on it so I took it part, cleaned the parts in gas and it now works. The problem is that it seems to be liking too much when in operation. Also it drips oil from the oil orifice when sitting for a while.

Also, I rebuilt the carb on this unit as it would not start. Now it starts fine but I am looking for the max RPM for these saws or perhaps the safe adjustment of the H screw so I don’t end up damaging the engine.

Thanks for any help!
 
HarleyT

HarleyT

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The oilers have a diaphram and gasket that gets torn when taking apart, hoses that are brittle, etc.. So you will likely need some parts in there.
 
smokey7

smokey7

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Good to know on the rpm...... As i set mine to 10,000. Mine seems to run stronger just a tad richer at 9300 to 9500. But if brushing trees only i will turn it up to 11000 so i dont have to push it to get to clean up.
 

teco

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Thanks for the replies! What type of tachometer are you guys using? I am looking for one. Not going to use it that often so would be looking for something cheap but accurate?
 
smokey7

smokey7

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Im using a tach/hour meter combo with the wire. I just wrap it around the wire a few times. It was bout 12 on amazon a couple years ago. Not real fast refreshvrate but does fine for me. I have a few mounted to stuff for a few years now too. Makes it super easy to watch the tube change and simple to spot a problem
 

teco

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Im using a tach/hour meter combo with the wire. I just wrap it around the wire a few times. It was bout 12 on amazon a couple years ago. Not real fast refreshvrate but does fine for me. I have a few mounted to stuff for a few years now too. Makes it super easy to watch the tube change and simple to spot a problem
Thanks very much for the reply. I was looking at these types of tachs and was wondering if they were good or not. Will give a try.
 

teco

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The oilers have a diaphram and gasket that gets torn when taking apart, hoses that are brittle, etc.. So you will likely need some parts in there.
When I pulled the diaphragm out to clean it it was a little “dry” but figured I would check and see if cleaning it would be enough. Would a torn gasket or diaphragm cause the pump to deliver more oil to the bar?
 
stubnail67

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it has a plunger and spring in there it the shaft could be stuck in the open position... i had one would not oil took it apart cleaned the crude on the metal shaft put it back together pushed it in and out put it back together and so far so good.....
 

teco

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The oilers have a diaphram and gasket that gets torn when taking apart, hoses that are brittle, etc.. So you will likely need some parts in there.
How can I verify that the Oiler line inside the casing is not cracked? Do I need to split the crankcase? If so how big of a job is that?
 

CJH

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You can remove the oil pump easily. Three screws is all it takes .the hose is attached to the nose off the pump. If its hard as a rock, check for cracks by pressurizing it. The other end is at the bar mount.

Cracking the case is easier on these as both sides of the crankshaft ride on needle bearings. Cylinder, carb off, remove all the screws and it will separate. Try to restrain the rod bearings as they will drop out. A rubber band, zip tie or piece of copper wire is all you need.

You're in there all the way, consider new rings, clean the cylinder bore with Scotchbrite and crank seals.

Match your case gasket, as there are two styles. The IPL shows them pretty clearly.
 

teco

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You can remove the oil pump easily. Three screws is all it takes .the hose is attached to the nose off the pump. If its hard as a rock, check for cracks by pressurizing it. The other end is at the bar mount.

Cracking the case is easier on these as both sides of the crankshaft ride on needle bearings. Cylinder, carb off, remove all the screws and it will separate. Try to restrain the rod bearings as they will drop out. A rubber band, zip tie or piece of copper wire is all you need.

You're in there all the way, consider new rings, clean the cylinder bore with Scotchbrite and crank seals.

Match your case gasket, as there are two styles. The IPL shows them pretty clearly.
Ok thanks I’ll recheck the hose first and ensure it is not cracked. If it is, I guess I’ll have to split the unit and go from there.
 
ray benson

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good day all,

I have an older 011 avt that I am working on right now.

My knowledge on chainsaws is limited at this point but am quite passionate about these things and decided that the best way to learn about them was to get my hands dirty and working on them.

The Oiler was not working on it so I took it part, cleaned the parts in gas and it now works. The problem is that it seems to be liking too much when in operation. Also it drips oil from the oil orifice when sitting for a while.

Also, I rebuilt the carb on this unit as it would not start. Now it starts fine but I am looking for the max RPM for these saws or perhaps the safe adjustment of the H screw so I don’t end up damaging the engine.

Thanks for any help!
Check your inbox for ipl and service manual
 

teco

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Ok so I pulled the piston cylinder out to check it and make sure the piston and cylinder were good. Sure enough, the little bearings fell out of place. I suppose that at this point I need to split the crankcase to put the bearing back in place? If so, can I split it without removing the clutch?

Wish I had read the manual before attempting this....

You can remove the oil pump easily. Three screws is all it takes .the hose is attached to the nose off the pump. If its hard as a rock, check for cracks by pressurizing it. The other end is at the bar mount.

Cracking the case is easier on these as both sides of the crankshaft ride on needle bearings. Cylinder, carb off, remove all the screws and it will separate. Try to restrain the rod bearings as they will drop out. A rubber band, zip tie or piece of copper wire is all you need.

You're in there all the way, consider new rings, clean the cylinder bore with Scotchbrite and crank seals.

Match your case gasket, as there are two styles. The IPL shows them pretty clearly.
 
StihlSolo

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You do not need to spilt the cases to replace the oil line. Take out the oil pump, 3 screws as said. Pull/push out the old oil line with its brass sleeve from the oil port. Save the sleeve.

Feed a new oil line in through the oil port. Have enough new line length so you can fish the line other end out from the oil pump hole. Press the sleeve into the end of the new line and pull/push the end into the oil port. Reattach the line to the pump end. You can have some extra line length. Also replace the foam filter and pump gasket while you're workiing on the oiler.

As said before these tend to weep oil out the breather, if left sitting/hanging with a full oil tank. Breather is a little hole behind the bar stud with a tiny cotter pin in it.
 

teco

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I wanted to look at the piston to see if it was still good and removed the cylinder. The rod bearings fell inside the crankcase.
You do not need to spilt the cases to replace the oil line. Take out the oil pump, 3 screws as said. Pull/push out the old oil line with its brass sleeve from the oil port. Save the sleeve.

Feed a new oil line in through the oil port. Have enough new line length so you can fish the line other end out from the oil pump hole. Press the sleeve into the end of the new line and pull/push the end into the oil port. Reattach the line to the pump end. You can have some extra line length. Also replace the foam filter and pump gasket while you're workiing on the oiler.

As said before these tend to weep oil out the breather, if left sitting/hanging with a full oil tank. Breather is a little hole behind the bar stud with a tiny cotter pin in it.
 
StihlSolo

StihlSolo

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Looks like you're splitting the cases after all. There are at least two different cases: the cases differ as to where the bottom rear pin is located. So there are two different types of case gaskets. Suggest don't buy a case gasket before you find out which case type you have. Taking apart is easy, so will skip to the next part.

Technique for rebuilding... First put a piston & rod assembly back into the cylinder. The piston long skirt side to the exhaust port side. Goop the cylinder base gasket up with grease and goop it to the cylinder base. Goop up those roller bearings with heavy grease (I use marine grease) and goop them onto the crankshaft. Lotta gooping.

Thread the rod bottom end onto the crankshaft not loosing any bearings. Make sure the nylon thrust washer is in place over the half case bearing. Thread the crankshaft with rod & cylinder assembly through the PTO case (you may need more than two hands). Bolt the cylnder to the half case, not tight - just enough to hold the bottom end from slipping sideways and to let the base gasket slip past the other half case as it goes on.

With gasket sealant (not silicone) place the case gasket. Thread the flywheel-side case on. Make sure its nylon thrust washer is in place. Bolt it all up, cases and other two cylinder base screws. Torquing is first the screws nearest the crankshaft and work outward. Let the sealant set.

Before going any further flush the case out with premix to try to get as much grease out as possible. I've done this enough I may have shortcutted the technique.
 

teco

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Looks like you're splitting the cases after all. There are at least two different cases: the cases differ as to where the bottom rear pin is located. So there are two different types of case gaskets. Suggest don't buy a case gasket before you find out which case type you have. Taking apart is easy, so will skip to the next part.

Technique for rebuilding... First put a piston & rod assembly back into the cylinder. The piston long skirt side to the exhaust port side. Goop the cylinder base gasket up with grease and goop it to the cylinder base. Goop up those roller bearings with heavy grease (I use marine grease) and goop them onto the crankshaft. Lotta gooping.

Thread the rod bottom end onto the crankshaft not loosing any bearings. Make sure the nylon thrust washer is in place over the half case bearing. Thread the crankshaft with rod & cylinder assembly through the PTO case (you may need more than two hands). Bolt the cylnder to the half case, not tight - just enough to hold the bottom end from slipping sideways and to let the base gasket slip past the other half case as it goes on.

With gasket sealant (not silicone) place the case gasket. Thread the flywheel-side case on. Make sure its nylon thrust washer is in place. Bolt it all up, cases and other two cylinder base screws. Torquing is first the screws nearest the crankshaft and work outward. Let the sealant set.

Before going any further flush the case out with premix to try to get as much grease out as possible. I've done this enough I may have shortcutted the technique.
Do you think I can put the little doll bearings back in place without splitting the saw?
 
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