ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


  1. Please see this post Click Here Please ask questions if you have them!! I hope this is going to be great for us all.
    Dismiss Notice

2017 tomatoes failed

Discussion in 'Farming and Gardening Forum' started by chuckwood, Nov 3, 2017.

  1. chuckwood

    chuckwood Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    6,310
    Likes Received:
    8,907
    Location:
    near the Great Smoky Mtns. Tennessee
    We had cool and rainy weather, which of course promoted fungal diseases. My plants produced very little before they turned brown and died. I suppose I could have sprayed them a lot with fungicides, but I had too many other tasks to do, and lacked enthusiasm for mixing sprays. Besides, in years past I've found that spraying doesn't accomplish too much anyway. I did prune them a lot, but that didn't help much either. I did learn something interesting. I planted some "volunteer" tomatoes that were growing wild in my tomato area from last year. These grew from seeds from hybrids and they had reverted back to whatever originals they were in making the hybrids. I did get small but tasty tomatoes from these "wild" plants. These "backwards" varieties turned out to be very resistant to disease, and they produced tomatoes all the way to the end of the season. So there *are* some tomatoes out there that will work in my garden. But it's going to be very difficult to find out what they were and probably impossible to purchase them.
     
    lone wolf and moondoggie like this.
  2. Conquistador3

    Conquistador3 Le Comte de Frou Frou

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    2,005
    Location:
    Mrs Miggins' Coffee Shop
    Try some varieties from Russia, Ukraine or Poland. They are the most resistant to fungal diseases and thrive even wth short, cool Summers. There are literally thousands of varieties to pick from so you can experiment and see what is better suited to your soil and micro-climate. If it's rotten as the one here, that's your best bet.
    I suggest you try Soldacki, Kosmonaut Volkov and Kakao for starters. Kakao was selected from the old Black Krim to solve some genetic instability issues it had. If you can get your hands on them, get some Sasha's Altai seeds. I thought it was all spin about this tomato until I got my hands on some seeds. The only problem this variety has is low productivity, for the rest believe the hype.

    One last thing. Fungus resistance or not, spray that tomatoes with a copper-based fungicide every two weeks. Unlless you have thousands of plants it doesn't take that much time and it's dirt cheap insurance.
     
    lone wolf and chuckwood like this.
  3. chuckwood

    chuckwood Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    6,310
    Likes Received:
    8,907
    Location:
    near the Great Smoky Mtns. Tennessee
    Thanks, next year I'll be trying some of these varieties you mention. Low productivity is still better than no productivity. Possibly one of my issues is that I'm buying tomato plants from local stores instead of growing my own from seed. My garden area has been in use for over a century, and has probably through the years accumulated a great stock of tomato fungus in the soil.
     
    lone wolf and farmer steve like this.
  4. Del_

    Del_ Life is but a song we sing.

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2002
    Messages:
    23,968
    Likes Received:
    4,018
    Location:
    N/E GA
    Look for varieties resistant and you are going to have to go hybrid.

    VNFT is what you want.
     
  5. chuckwood

    chuckwood Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    6,310
    Likes Received:
    8,907
    Location:
    near the Great Smoky Mtns. Tennessee
    I've tried fungus resistant hybrids and they didn't do much better than the heirlooms. I think my soil is infected pretty badly from many years of growing tomatoes in the same general area. I move them around from year to year, but it doesn't seem to do much good.
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  6. Del_

    Del_ Life is but a song we sing.

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2002
    Messages:
    23,968
    Likes Received:
    4,018
    Location:
    N/E GA
    Your tomato cages are infected, too. Plus your gardening habits may spread disease. TMV is spread by cigarette smokers with their hands.
     
    amberg and farmer steve like this.
  7. Conquistador3

    Conquistador3 Le Comte de Frou Frou

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    2,005
    Location:
    Mrs Miggins' Coffee Shop
    For a few years around here we had serious problems with cucumber mosaic virus, so I obviously tried varieties marketed as "virus resistant", such as Aphrodite Summer squashes. A whole lot of good they did. That's how I learned not to trust what is written on the label, especially of F1 hybrids and seeds commonly sold in nurseries. The problem was solved through trial and error: I now grow a squash variety I got on trade from the Donbass which seems perfectly suited to local growing conditions.

    Anyway I think your first task is to correctly identify what caused your problems: it's useless to attempt tackling, say, Fusarium wilt if your problem is, say, Late blight.
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  8. farmer steve

    farmer steve outstanding in my field, 5150

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2013
    Messages:
    13,581
    Likes Received:
    99,298
    Location:
    Stihl, PA
    here's one i have tried with some pretty good disease resistance. i just pulled this off the web so you may want to look for better prices. plowing you garden instead of tilling may help too. as mentioned earlier a regular copper spray will help. also chlorothalonil is a good protective fungicide. for tomatoes and other veggies. read the label!!! as Del said possibly your cages need disinfected. burn all your tomato plant refuse if you can. do not compost it!!!!!
     
    amberg likes this.
  9. Marine5068

    Marine5068 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,633
    Likes Received:
    2,066
    Location:
    Madoc, Ontario, Canada
    I'd like to grow some tomatoes and a few other veggies to can for my small family.
    My father was an amazing gardener. He grew some pretty fantastic food that's for sure.
    He never composted but did use cow manure and made his own soil as well as working in the garden every day.
    I am just getting tired of supermarket produce that is costly, lacks flavor and is possibly not good for us in the long term because of pesticides, GMO and other factory farm issues.
    I am planning to start small and use raised beds and mix my own soil.
    Will start with tomatoes, bell peppers, and some kind of beans.
    Any info or input would be great. I have a good collection of sweet bell pepper seeds collected over the years.
     
    Conquistador3 likes this.
  10. Conquistador3

    Conquistador3 Le Comte de Frou Frou

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    2,005
    Location:
    Mrs Miggins' Coffee Shop
    Well, good for you!

    I don't know if they are still available, but I suggest you check one of John Seymour's books on vegetable gardening, for no other reason he's one of the few authors outside of France to have covered in-depth the method of soil preparation through "deep bedding" or, as it's called around here, "French bedding". It's the one best suited to small lots because it was originally developed for market gardens, hence the need for high productivity.

    If you are starting from scratch remember the first couple of years can be a bit disappointing, either because the soil is still not "broken in" or because you still have to find the most suitable cultivars to your growing conditions. Given your area I suggest you check into Russian/Ukrainian/Polish cultivars as they are the best suited for short, hot Summers and generally unfavorable growing conditions.
    If you plan to start plants from seeds, invest in one or more decent seedboxes and a grow light. I am presently waiting one of those new fancy "UFO" LED grow lights to try out on the seed boxes. Seed indoors at very least four weeks before transplanting outdoors: remember peppers vary wildly in germination time (for five days to over two weeks) and many of the seeds you have may not be viable anymore.

    One final thing: forget about all the things you've heard about "no pesticides". You will need them, otherwise you are just sweating a lot to feed a bunch of rather unpleasant bugs. What can you do is be smart when using them: for example you can replace formaldehyde-based slug poison with iron sulfite, which is very low toxicity (you'll get an upset stomach well before eating enough to hurt yourself) and breaks down well before reaching the water table.
    And while well composted manure is excellent to start the season, crops with high nutritive requirements, such as eggplants, will require additional applications of fertilizer during the season.
     
    Marine5068 likes this.
  11. Marine5068

    Marine5068 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,633
    Likes Received:
    2,066
    Location:
    Madoc, Ontario, Canada
    Thanks for some great tips and I will definitely read up more on gardening and growing from seed.
    I do have two large light tables for starting plants indoors.
    Should be interesting and I'm sure my vegetarian wife will love the home grown flavor.
     
  12. Conquistador3

    Conquistador3 Le Comte de Frou Frou

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    2,005
    Location:
    Mrs Miggins' Coffee Shop
    If you want to start some plants from seed you need to start well before planting times and to choose early cultivars.
    For example if you want eggplants, you need to plant them in the open when they are at least 4" tall and choose early cultivars such as Almaz or Clara, which will give you good yield during the first (and only) year of life and before the weather becomes too cold for them. Oh, and a little trick to increase the yield I learned from Pakistani immigrants: plant them in hole filled 50/50 with ordinary soil and dry manure. ;)
     
  13. StihlBadger

    StihlBadger ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    NE GA
    I have had good luck with Ichiban eggplants in my garden.I have some pepper plants and several unknown variety eggplants in a fig tree container that I have overwintered in my kitchen from Summer 2017. I hope to get an early start once the weather warms up.
     
  14. Mycrossover

    Mycrossover ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2018
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    99
    Location:
    US
    Ichiban means #1 in Japanese and they sure are. The the skin is thin and they are so sweet.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
     
    StihlBadger likes this.
  15. Trickyputt

    Trickyputt ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Birmingham
    I have an old plot in Alabama and I use this thyme oil product. I tilled it in heavy 4 times across winter before the spring planting. I also sprayed the product during the season, at least every 2-3 weeks. I had 32 tomato plants because usually the organic methods I try keep me behind the curve so more plants but reduced yield was my strategy. Well that turned out to be a problem this year. The wife was bitchin about all the work puttin up tomatoes. And everything else, cucumber, squash etc. It all jumped. It turns out, if you look into it, thyme oil is a nasty thing to do to any fungus. It might not kill every little thing, but it damn sure slows down the progressive death so the plant can get its fruits on.

    IMG_20180924_131224.jpg
     
  16. Little Al

    Little Al Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    2,112
    Location:
    Midi pyrenees FRANCE
    One last thing. Fungus resistance or not, spray that tomatoes with a copper-based fungicide every two weeks. Unlless you have thousands of plants it doesn't take that much time and it's dirt cheap insurance.[/QUOTE] & mixing Potassium potash with your watering water helps & the taste "muuuummm" google give you the lowdown
     

Share This Page