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2021 garden season

muddstopper

muddstopper

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Nov 20, 2011
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mountains of nc
I have used the remains from my smoker for meat smoking over the years. I have a large 5gal metal can with a removable top. I fill the can with wood chunks and put the lid on it and put on my propane turkey cooker. The lid has a 2 inch hole in it. I place the can under the meat to be smoked and lite up the burner. The smoke rises from the can onto the meat. This is a cold smoke, not a cooking smoke. the wood chips will smoke but not burn. When I am done smoking, I pour water down in the can top hole to put out any smoldering wood chips. This is charcoal that has been burnt with no oxygen.. After the char is cooled down, it has little to none nutrient value and is very porous. Putting the material as is in your garden will absorb any available nutrients and lock it up making it unavailable to your plants. The best way to inoculate the char is to go out into the woods and dig up some tops soil and blend it with the char. The char will pull out any nutrients as well as beneficial microbes and inoculate your garden soil. It takes about a couple days to fully inoculate your char, two weeks if you are looking for beneficial fungi. A lot of folks will soak the char in compost teas but poorly made compost tea will also inoculate the char with harmful microbes. I dont have anyway to tell what microbes my char is soaking up so I just stick with forest floor topsoil. I know a lot of folks like to make large amounts of biochar at a time and they make large barrels inside of barrels to cook their char. For container gardens, it doesnt take a lot and once it has been applied, you dont have to reapply every year. Another way to get char is to pull it out of your wood stove, just pull out some of the big coals and drop in a bucket of water, or sift your ashes and save the little bits of charcoal, it isnt the same as biochar because it is burnt in a oxygen type atmosphere, but its almost as good. I dont know what Hugelkultur is, I will have to read up on it.
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,614
Location
Yakivegas.
Man you guys are hardcore lol. My composting consists of cutting everything in the garden off at ground level, then running it thru the chipper/shredder along with all the other yard waste for the year (leaves grass clippings etc) and depositing it in the middle of the garden where it will sit over winter. In the spring I add whatever ash from the shop stove, then I go to the Co Op for several bags of chicken manure and mushroom compost then till all that in.
B319ED31-656F-4A96-8539-5F7852400FCB.jpeg
For weed control I go down to Lowe’s or Home Depot and buy the heavy duty 6mil plastic sheeting. After everything is tilled and leveled, I plot everything out and dig holes then lay the sheeting over it. After that cut an X over each hole and drop the plants in.
1F82F600-2999-490A-A4B6-A0391D2E0A69.jpeg


Irrigation district usually has things up and running by mid March, and we usually have water available until late October. I use a simple system of 5/8 main line with 1/4 line to each plant. No drip emitters because they clog and I don’t want to mess with a disc filter. This runs on a Orbit water timer and I have an inline fertigation setup that I fill once a week with Alaska brand 5-1-1 fish fertilizer and 0-10-10 morbloom. 71A27FCC-2665-4F2E-8B1B-E2A5E841D44B.jpeg

this was just one of my 2019 Chile harvests
67C3F5D0-FF6C-4775-B134-086835296C78.jpeg E60EDE05-2766-454D-BF6B-F0DDF4F5EB8E.jpeg
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,614
Location
Yakivegas.
I’ve been wanting to finish the grow room in the garage but an opportunity came up that I couldn’t pass on. Good friend of mine was into growing cannabis for the medical dispensaries, but lost interest when they changed some of the laws for recreational use because there’s not much money in it unless you are a large scale operation. Anyways he gave me this 10x5 foot grow tent and another 4x4 tent. My grow room was 6x9 so it’s perfect just need to cut the shelves back so it fits in the corner. It will be nice to take it down after use and store it instead of having a dedicated room I only use 3-4 months out of the year
348C2F80-F39A-483A-BBA1-7E4FFF33C592.jpeg
 
farmer steve

farmer steve

outstanding in my field, 5150
Joined
Feb 8, 2013
Messages
18,539
Location
Stihl, PA
Man you guys are hardcore lol. My composting consists of cutting everything in the garden off at ground level, then running it thru the chipper/shredder along with all the other yard waste for the year (leaves grass clippings etc) and depositing it in the middle of the garden where it will sit over winter. In the spring I add whatever ash from the shop stove, then I go to the Co Op for several bags of chicken manure and mushroom compost then till all that in.
View attachment 886886
For weed control I go down to Lowe’s or Home Depot and buy the heavy duty 6mil plastic sheeting. After everything is tilled and leveled, I plot everything out and dig holes then lay the sheeting over it. After that cut an X over each hole and drop the plants in.
View attachment 886885


Irrigation district usually has things up and running by mid March, and we usually have water available until late October. I use a simple system of 5/8 main line with 1/4 line to each plant. No drip emitters because they clog and I don’t want to mess with a disc filter. This runs on a Orbit water timer and I have an inline fertigation setup that I fill once a week with Alaska brand 5-1-1 fish fertilizer and 0-10-10 morbloom. View attachment 886895

this was just one of my 2019 Chile harvests
View attachment 886896 View attachment 886897
Looks great. Where did you find Coors light seeds? :laughing:
 
AKTrailDog

AKTrailDog

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2020
Messages
82
Location
Alaska
I’ve been wanting to finish the grow room in the garage but an opportunity came up that I couldn’t pass on. Good friend of mine was into growing cannabis for the medical dispensaries, but lost interest when they changed some of the laws for recreational use because there’s not much money in it unless you are a large scale operation. Anyways he gave me this 10x5 foot grow tent and another 4x4 tent. My grow room was 6x9 so it’s perfect just need to cut the shelves back so it fits in the corner. It will be nice to take it down after use and store it instead of having a dedicated room I only use 3-4 months out of the year
View attachment 886903
Those small grow tents are great! I have two that I use for various growing operations. Depending on what you're growing, having proper ventilation in them is key
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,614
Location
Yakivegas.
Looks great. Where did you find Coors light seeds? :laughing:
:laugh: Oh man I wish that were the case. Save me a lot of money!
Those small grow tents are great! I have two that I use for various growing operations. Depending on what you're growing, having proper ventilation in them is key
He’s bringing me the ventilation fans and some other accessories today and I should have things squared away by weeks end. The spare bedroom is getting crowded and the wife ain’t liking it lol.
 
5backacres

Del_

Career arborist
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Messages
26,922
Location
U. S. of A.
I’ve been wanting to finish the grow room in the garage but an opportunity came up that I couldn’t pass on. Good friend of mine was into growing cannabis for the medical dispensaries, but lost interest when they changed some of the laws for recreational use because there’s not much money in it unless you are a large scale operation. Anyways he gave me this 10x5 foot grow tent and another 4x4 tent. My grow room was 6x9 so it’s perfect just need to cut the shelves back so it fits in the corner. It will be nice to take it down after use and store it instead of having a dedicated room I only use 3-4 months out of the year
View attachment 886903

Awesome tent!

I need one so I don't light up my whole living room!
 
muddstopper

muddstopper

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Nov 20, 2011
Messages
5,425
Location
mountains of nc
Man you guys are hardcore lol. My composting consists of cutting everything in the garden off at ground level, then running it thru the chipper/shredder along with all the other yard waste for the year (leaves grass clippings etc) and depositing it in the middle of the garden where it will sit over winter. In the spring I add whatever ash from the shop stove, then I go to the Co Op for several bags of chicken manure and mushroom compost then till all that in.
View attachment 886886
For weed control I go down to Lowe’s or Home Depot and buy the heavy duty 6mil plastic sheeting. After everything is tilled and leveled, I plot everything out and dig holes then lay the sheeting over it. After that cut an X over each hole and drop the plants in.
View attachment 886885


Irrigation district usually has things up and running by mid March, and we usually have water available until late October. I use a simple system of 5/8 main line with 1/4 line to each plant. No drip emitters because they clog and I don’t want to mess with a disc filter. This runs on a Orbit water timer and I have an inline fertigation setup that I fill once a week with Alaska brand 5-1-1 fish fertilizer and 0-10-10 morbloom. View attachment 886895

this was just one of my 2019 Chile harvests
View attachment 886896 View attachment 886897
Just want to ask what size are those planter bags are you using for you plants. I was about to order a few today, but wasnt sure what size would work best. I am thinking some 10gal sizes for planting a few sweet potatoes and maybe some regular potatoes, then going with either 5gal or 7 gal for tomatoes and peppers. I might try a few squash and zucchini plants and will certainly be planting some onions. I have planted in 5 gal buckets before, tomatoes and peppers, but it seems the plastic lowes/homedepot and sheetrock mud buckets are not hardly large enough. They work ok but seem to narrow to work really well.
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,614
Location
Yakivegas.
Just want to ask what size are those planter bags are you using for you plants. I was about to order a few today, but wasnt sure what size would work best. I am thinking some 10gal sizes for planting a few sweet potatoes and maybe some regular potatoes, then going with either 5gal or 7 gal for tomatoes and peppers. I might try a few squash and zucchini plants and will certainly be planting some onions. I have planted in 5 gal buckets before, tomatoes and peppers, but it seems the plastic lowes/homedepot and sheetrock mud buckets are not hardly large enough. They work ok but seem to narrow to work really well.
The smaller bags are 7gal the bigger ones are 30gal. 7gal is fine for peppers, tomatoes, zucchini and even pumpkin . But I would recommend the bigger pots for root vegetables. I had blueberries in the 30gal pots in the picture. 7gal pots were cayenne

I have a 30 gal bag I’ll never use if you want it. Might give you an idea of what you are working with.
B565838E-BB9F-4B0F-A8B2-D81CB049AA4F.jpeg
 
muddstopper

muddstopper

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mountains of nc
I appreciate the offer of the 30gal bag, but I will be lining up my bags along the back porch, and I dont think I want to use bags that size. The 7gal pots you are using for the peppers and tomatoes look just about right for what I am wanting to do and I think I will be ordering about a dozen of that size. Unless I decide to trim out some additional space, and I will be later on, thats about all I have room for. I noticed you had plates under your planter bags. For holding water I assume?
 
5backacres

5backacres

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jan 30, 2021
Messages
48
Location
SW Washington state
To get watermelons to do well we use black road matting for heat and weed reduction (but moles tend to get under it) and old tires on top of the mat. for each transplant Tires work best if still on a rim with inner tube inside filled with water. I use builders paper under tomatoes to prevent wilt and weeds. According to Ed Hume if you use something under the plant to stop the rain induced splashing of dirt on to the plant iot prevents virus in the dirt from infecting the plant .
 

Del_

Career arborist
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Messages
26,922
Location
U. S. of A.
To get watermelons to do well we use black road matting for heat and weed reduction (but moles tend to get under it) and old tires on top of the mat. for each transplant Tires work best if still on a rim with inner tube inside filled with water. I use builders paper under tomatoes to prevent wilt and weeds. According to Ed Hume if you use something under the plant to stop the rain induced splashing of dirt on to the plant iot prevents virus in the dirt from infecting the plant .

It is true that tomato leaf disease is often splashed up onto the leaves by rain and watering. Also disease is spread by splashes coming from already diseased foliage. Also some tomato leaf disease can be carried over winter on tomato cages or stakes. Also people move diseases around. Also smokers can transmit tobacco mosaic virus from cigs and cigars.

A good general rule is to never work or harvest when leaves are wet.
 
southpaw

southpaw

I react 2 B Venom
Joined
Jun 5, 2009
Messages
419
Location
central wisconsin
It is true that tomato leaf disease is often splashed up onto the leaves by rain and watering. Also disease is spread by splashes coming from already diseased foliage. Also some tomato leaf disease can be carried over winter on tomato cages or stakes. Also people move diseases around. Also smokers can transmit tobacco mosaic virus from cigs and cigars.

A good general rule is to never work or harvest when leaves are wet.
Good advice on the tomato disease , think I run the weed burner over the tomato cages and cattle panels before planting this season

Probably going to put a heavy layer of wood chips around the tomato plant base also to control splashing
 

Del_

Career arborist
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Messages
26,922
Location
U. S. of A.
I'm just getting seedlings started this year. I usually start earlier than I should but this year I should be right on time. Starting early leads to lots of extra time spent growing transplants larger than they have to be. Most vegetable don't really get off to such a great start when started early. Once outside growing conditions get right stuff usually leaps out of the ground growing at rates that are near impossible indoors.

This year I've been using an egg incubator to 'hatch' seedlings. I had it laying around and this is the first time I've tried it. Very high humidity so I decided to remove the sprouted seeds after 4 days at 88°F. It is adjustable in temperature but offers little to no light. Once I saw the first pepper seedling I checked closer and saw 4. I just tonight removed 12 cell packs of 4 cells each totaling 48 cells total onto open cafeteria trays. I planted two pepper seeds in each cell about 1/2 apart for easier transplanting. I've had great success transplanting small seedlings over the years into other cell packs. When a seedling is disturbed or transplanted I mark them with a tooth pick in the cell pack and that is how I know how they perform. I use a stainless steel letter opener as a dibble.

Tonight 12 X 4 cell packs planted in tomatoes get moved to the incubator. I've planted the below tomato varieties. Production is about to start kicking ass.

Italian Heirloom
48 seeds​
Brandywind OTV
48 seeds​
Matt's Wild Cherry
32 seeds​
Amish Paste
32 seeds​
Sungold
32 seeds​
Better Boy 31 seeds
Opalka32 seeds


2021 vegetable seedling set up 002.JPG


2021 vegetable seedling set up 001.JPG


 
sean donato

sean donato

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Aug 3, 2014
Messages
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Eastern, PA
At least for me, it seems of we dont get the seeds started end of January or beginning of February, were not getting crops till late in the season. Which was always a bummer for us, causing us (my wife mainly) to go out and buy half grown plants so we could have tomatoes earlier. Not this year. I'm hoping to avoid that.
 
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