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2021 garden season

Backyard Lumberjack

Backyard Lumberjack

"No wood, No fire!"
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
18,315
Location
Echoville, TEXAS
I've almost given up on squash for the same reason. I get a couple Zucchini or yellow squash before the borers kill the plants. I try Sevin, but I'm usually too late. Anyone know a better way to control them?
little red dots close to plant, then along stalk... . some say to remove them. have tried, but moths always win. have tried camping bug nets, too. semi-effective... store bot? 100% effective! lol
 
Backyard Lumberjack

Backyard Lumberjack

"No wood, No fire!"
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
18,315
Location
Echoville, TEXAS
but then i dragged out some fall seeds... see what might get with it over the next 60 days or so...
P7210010.JPG P7210011.JPG P7210013.JPG
and some carrots, spinach and some bottom of bag mystery seeds. carrots or lettuce... bok choi should make some good harvestable young bok choi, brussels just for the grins, wont like summer. see how they do. if i can get them started early enough like Farmer Steve suggested, might get some if i plant up at my ranch. they are a 90-day seed. P7210012.JPG always colder there compared to H in fall. no doubt they sure would like these temps down here... brrr. cilantro. every grow it? very tender set once germinated... but does well with care. and garden fresh is unbeatable!
 
Backyard Lumberjack

Backyard Lumberjack

"No wood, No fire!"
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
18,315
Location
Echoville, TEXAS
Grew pac-choi and cilantro one time, didnt care for either one! lol! Love your 2 growing seasons!
hi S580 - interesting you din't. i like to stir fry or boil bok choi in w/or in salted water. dash butter. crunchy and tasty, imo. some like cilantro and some don't. i read it is a bio thing unique to each individual. taste buds, i guess... but lol

no need to tell all the Tex/Mex crowd down here... they think it's lettuce! lol :laugh:
 
Backyard Lumberjack

Backyard Lumberjack

"No wood, No fire!"
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
18,315
Location
Echoville, TEXAS
think i will just pull most of my remaining tomatoes. got plenty. ripe and ripening inside hse. but not sure what i will do with this cluster. 11 nice tomatoes, still green... not even sure super extra wrap will save them. not at 18f or so... might have to put a light bulb in the wrap with them... they would no doubt make muster then...
P7210007.JPG
 
jollygreengiant

jollygreengiant

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Apr 7, 2011
Messages
25
Location
Ontario, Canada
Reading all these posts is making me really excited to get some seeds in the ground! Sadly that won't be for a few weeks yet; I don't start peppers until the end of March, and usually set them out around the end of May. Tomatoes I'll start in April. I usually try and have some lettuce planted outside in the first half of April, but unless we get a warm March that may not happen. We have a lot of snow right now. But this year I ordered all my seeds in January and most of them are already here. Last year I tried ordering in March and a lot of stuff was sold out because everyone was panic buying seeds because of Covid.

I am looking forward to the 2021 growing season. Last year was the first year with a new garden site on a new property, and it was a struggle. But I got it cleaned up last fall and worked in some fertilizer so hopefully that is a good first step. Also got some garlic planted last fall, hopefully it survives the winter. And I have strawberry plants on order for this spring; I've been without my strawberry bed for too long.
 
sonny580

sonny580

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
219
Location
Illinois
Add more fertilizer this spring too! --IF you can get your hands on some compost, tree leaves, manure, etc. that would help a bunch too.
We might try garlic this fall ----been wanting to for several years but never get it done.
Strawberries are addictive!!! --- we have a small patch. Last year the flowers got froze by late freeze and only got 6 quarts, late from them. No fruit at all last year---hope for better year this time.
Seed flats here are last of Feb.---first of Mar. time period indoors. The outdoor hotbed comes later in March.
We have a lot of saved seed but do buy a few packages of new seed to mix in. The biggest problem with new seed is that a package is 5 or 10 seeds and price has tripled on them!
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,575
Location
Yakivegas.
Yeah the Covid panic definitely put a dent in the seed and germination market last year. Heck it put a dent in just about anything related to gardening in general so I guess that’s why they are trying to get ahead of things this year. I can’t remember ever seeing seeds and germination supplies on the shelves on Jan 1. I also noticed the price of seeds has jumped about a dollar per pack or more in some instances.
 
Goinwheelin

Goinwheelin

Vintage Chainsaw Hipster
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Messages
2,575
Location
Yakivegas.
jollygreengiant

jollygreengiant

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Apr 7, 2011
Messages
25
Location
Ontario, Canada
Add more fertilizer this spring too! --IF you can get your hands on some compost, tree leaves, manure, etc. that would help a bunch too.
We might try garlic this fall ----been wanting to for several years but never get it done.
Strawberries are addictive!!! --- we have a small patch. Last year the flowers got froze by late freeze and only got 6 quarts, late from them. No fruit at all last year---hope for better year this time.
Seed flats here are last of Feb.---first of Mar. time period indoors. The outdoor hotbed comes later in March.
We have a lot of saved seed but do buy a few packages of new seed to mix in. The biggest problem with new seed is that a package is 5 or 10 seeds and price has tripled on them!

I was hoping to get strawberries in last spring so that we would have berries for this spring. But breaking the sod took a lot more work than I expected, and then it turned very dry and it was a struggle just keeping what we had alive.

Yeah the Covid panic definitely put a dent in the seed and germination market last year. Heck it put a dent in just about anything related to gardening in general so I guess that’s why they are trying to get ahead of things this year. I can’t remember ever seeing seeds and germination supplies on the shelves on Jan 1. I also noticed the price of seeds has jumped about a dollar per pack or more in some instances.

I couldn't believe it last year, I had to go order seed from 3 different places and I could only order what was left. I couldn't even get the usual blight resistant tomatoes that I normally order, but thankfully I had a few left from last year. And also we were lucky to not have much blight last year.

Looking like it may be a dry one. Looking back to this time in 2012, it starting off looking worse now.

I hope not. My garden spot is beyond the range of my hose so I have to haul all the water to the site and water by hand. I'm hoping to setup a rain collection system on my shop this year so I won't have to haul water, and with any luck I'll get a pump and hose set up too.
 
southpaw

southpaw

I react 2 B Venom
Joined
Jun 5, 2009
Messages
419
Location
central wisconsin
Wood ash is very alkaline , can be good or bad in your garden as it will affect the PH balance

I use at the head of my gravel roadways for ice , sometimes toss in the compost piles and throw some on top of the gardens to help them thaw sooner

Think environment and don't knowingly have them going to a landfill
 
sonny580

sonny580

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
219
Location
Illinois
I spread ashes on the garden all the time. ---- many years ago an old timer told me that burning turns stalks/weeds/trees/etc. into phos. and potash.---or releases it---something to that extent, and I think there is probably a lot of truth to it. --- Ever notice how healthy the weeds and grass grow in your burn piles????
 
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