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562 XP - scored cylinder? Pics for help.

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by terpjr, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. terpjr

    terpjr ArboristSite Lurker

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    I posted a couple of weeks ago about a 562 XP. I had replaced fuel lines and, to do that, had removed and reinstalled carb. It started and ran fine, when warmed up it began to run lean and race. I shut it down. Ensured that I had put things back together correctly, started and ran fine, once warm began to race, so I shut it down.
    I took it to a local shop who told me that I had a torn boot which was causing it to run lean and that it was packed with dirt/crud. I was told that the cylinder or piston was toast They told me that it was cost prohibitive for them to fix (neighborhood of $300 for parts and another 2-300 for labor). So I should buy a new saw.
    I intend to fix it myself at this point. I am capable but do not have the knowledge or experience with chainsaws, so I posted on here for advice on what to do next.
    I was advised to get my saw back and take pictures of the piston and post here.
    The saw did come back in pieces (which at least tells me they tore it down to look).
    torn boot.jpg
    I have posted a picture off the torn boot (or what I assume he meant by boot). It appears to be torn on the exterior but each channel of it seems to be air tight. Either way, I am going to replace it, at roughly $15 it isn't worth not doing so.
    piston 1.jpg piston line.jpg piston top.jpg ppiston 1.jpg
    The piston appears to not have any major lines or craters from what I can see. The extreme right and left of the top third of it are dark in color as compared to the rest. There also appears to be a distinct color change about halfway down from a duller silver to a brighter silver.
    I have posted the pictures of what I could see through where the muffler was.
    heat deflector.jpg
    Lastly, I posted a picture of the heat deflector...which appears to be damaged...

    Thoughts and advice?
    Next step - compression test?
     
  2. terpjr

    terpjr ArboristSite Lurker

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    Also, if anyone has any tips for getting better pictures of this...
    I know they aren't great
     
  3. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    I don't see anything in the pics that jumps out at me. Do you have a compression tester? The brown color is just burnt oil. So many of these shops are just there to sell new saws. I buy units like yours when the shop convinces the owner that it's a "lost cause". More often than not the work needed is minimal.
     
  4. terpjr

    terpjr ArboristSite Lurker

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    I am going to pick up a cheap compression tester in the next day or two...
     
  5. sunfish

    sunfish Fish Head

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    Piston and cylinder look fine from what I can see. That shop just didn't want to fix it.
     
  6. Trent Curtis

    Trent Curtis ArboristSite Operative

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    I haven’t been to a single Stihl, husqvarna dealer (or any other saw dealership) who does honest service work.

    They are in the business of selling saws.... not fixing them. Period.

    $500 to rebuild a saw is ubsurd.
     
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  7. Trent Curtis

    Trent Curtis ArboristSite Operative

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    Exactly. I’d be very very surprised if that cylinder was damaged, provided I t was shut down quickly like you said. If the piston got a little scored up you can get another one for $75. Any light transfer can easily be removed from the cylinder wall....

    Stick with it- you have a fine saw there that will
    Most likely be repaired for under $100-
     
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  8. 2stroker

    2stroker ArboristSite Operative

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    That is sad for you. I get around about 20 shops on a fairly regular basis here in Northcentral Ohio. The vast majority of the Stlh l and Husky dealers here do a great job repairing saws. Our dealers need to keep the good techs they have busy. I also think the dealer may make more money on a extensive repair, 40% markup on parts and $50 to $80 per hour larbor, than what they make selling a new saw.
    Back on topic. How did the boot tear?
    Pop the cylinder off and pics then will be more conclusive, but it sure looks like the cylinder will clean-up!America
    2stroker
     
  9. terpjr

    terpjr ArboristSite Lurker

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    I don’t know how the boot tore...

    So- should I test compression first? Or take cylinder off? If I do take cylinder apart...assuming all looks good...are there any parts that must be purchased in the cylinder/piston assembly for re-assembly? Gaskets/typical throwaway wear parts?

    Sorry to ask so many questions. This has been a great running saw for me and I would hate to a) do more damage
    B) do unnecessary stuff
     
  10. 2stroker

    2stroker ArboristSite Operative

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    Are the av springs intact? It's hard for me to believe the boot tore if the avs are intact.
    I'm not a believer in compression testing. I would much rather invest in p/v testing, but I your case we have a known cause of the lean condition.
    If you pull the cylinder you'll be able to inspect and see if there is any transfer. Deal with new piston or just rings.
    A gasket is always a good idea.
    2stroker
     
  11. Chainsaw Jim

    Chainsaw Jim CJ Saws

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    There's two ways to fix a saw... One way is the complete way where money isn't a factor. Another way is just get it running so the job can be finished and then pay the piper later.
    Even though the pics are a little blurry it looks like it's been ridden hard and put up wet, and that piston looks to be at the end of its lifespan. The cylinder will likely be just fine, but it's worth buying the entire cylinder kit with the cost of a new piston being only 40 less.

    Bottom line to properly rebuild this thing it would be
    $147 for the cylinder kit,
    $70 for bearings and seals,
    $12 gasket kit,
    $15 carb kit,
    $15 carb boot,
    $15 fuel line/ filter,
    $12 tank vent,
    $10 purge bubble,
    $70 clutch assembly/drum/sprocket,
    $150 labor
    Which totals $516.
    And if the crankshaft doesn't pass inspection then it's over with.

    Or... with limited cash DIY, only replace what seems necessary and make it work.

    Most reputable shops in the business don't like to put something out that's been half assed fixed because it'll always lead to negative feedback.
     
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  12. Trent Curtis

    Trent Curtis ArboristSite Operative

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    Totally agree with you Jim- but I know I can speak for the dealerships around here.... they wouldn’t replace all that for $150 in labor. If they were to split cases it would be insane expensive.
     
  13. Thommo

    Thommo ArboristSite Operative

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    The mark on the piston is not that bad. It is probably only carbon scoring. If it was mine i would take the cylinder off so i could clean all the carbon out of the ports and piston, and check the ring gap while i had it apart. It most likely only needs a new boot and a gasket between the muffler and cylinder but might need new rings too
     
  14. terpjr

    terpjr ArboristSite Lurker

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    Ok. So from what I am reading...

    Don’t bother with compression test.
    Remove cylinder and take a good look at piston and rings.
    If piston and rings check out, reassemble, new boot, new muffler gasket.

    At the point.
    Fire it up?
    Do a leak test?

    Will remove piston tonight or tomorrow then post pics of what I found.
     
  15. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    Check ring end gap when you have it apart.

    Or just check compression before you start...
     
  16. Cycledude

    Cycledude ArboristSite Operative

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    Am I the only one that’s always amazed at how many folks seem to take stuff apart before cleaning it ?
     
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  17. Huskybill

    Huskybill ArboristSite Guru

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    The only dealer I deal with is chainsaws unlimited in southbury,ct. I seen other dealers problem saws get sent to him to fix. Bill
     
  18. Okie294life

    Okie294life Small engine jackwagen.

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    If you are concerned about compression I would recommend going to autozone and borrowing a compression tester for free. Hell you could do it onsite and hand it back to them. There’s the old drop test too. With the decomp off you should be able to hold it from the handle and let it drop and watch it descend slowly. If all that checks out put the boot back on and have them do a pressure test on it. They shouldn’t charge more than 20-30 dollars if they are a reputable dealer. The pressure test will tell if there is any other source of air leak and other stuff you need to fix.
     

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