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A tree covered in vines, should I chop the vines

romeojk27

romeojk27

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Hi folks, New guy here looking for some expert advise. Thanks for coming in today!
Say, I have a large tree covered by vines. The vines don't bother me and u think the birds and such like it. If they can live in harmony with the tree then I'll let it be...let it be. But if the vines gotta go, when then it's gotta go.

The vines are pretty attached but I expect I will be able to cut them if that's the consensus.

If I do have to cut them, do I cut them at the bottom and they will die off all the way up the tree and then the vines will fall off as they dry out, or what should I do amd expect.

Thanks again. I really love my trees. I have about 3 good beautiful oaks and a dozen including the neighbors. They are great to listen to and to look at.



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DR. P. Proteus

DR. P. Proteus

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Its ivy, its not so bad as vines. As a tree guy I say its not to bad to climb up and de-vine something like that though it would be more for looks. If you just cut the bottom you will be looking at dead brown ivy for the rest of your life and make more of a mess than you have know which isn't to bad of a mess. I would say around 600 to de-vine but that's just cause I'm old, tired, mean, unkempt, bipolar and probably a little drunk.
 
BC WetCoast

BC WetCoast

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I would recommend removing the ivy. It tends to harbour moisture in the branch junctions leading to premature decay and in extreme cases I've seen the weight of the vines break branches.

You can cut the ivy at the bottom and let it die. Take out about a 1' swath. Just use a handsaw, secateurs and a screwdriver (to pull it away from the bark). You can take more off if you like.
 
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romeojk27

romeojk27

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Thanks for the advice. Since it does not sound like the tree is in mortal danger I'll let it continue. There are some birds up there who seem to enjoy the ivy. Thanks again!


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Del_

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The ivy isn't so bad at this point but you could cut it at ground level. The birds will be fine and continue to live there. Be careful to do no cutting into the tree. The brown dead ivy doesn't look that bad and I've got several trees in the front yard that just got this ivy treatment. The ivy will grow back up the tree but it will take ten years or so and then repeat the cutting at ground level. I would never pay someone to remove the vines from the tree as it is just not necessary.
 
DR. P. Proteus

DR. P. Proteus

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The ivy isn't so bad at this point but you could cut it at ground level. The birds will be fine and continue to live there. Be careful to do no cutting into the tree. The brown dead ivy doesn't look that bad and I've got several trees in the front yard that just got this ivy treatment. The ivy will grow back up the tree but it will take ten years or so and then repeat the cutting at ground level. I would never pay someone to remove the vines from the tree as it is just not necessary.

Probably ain't to much TO pay for in NW Gerga that you couldn't do yerself and who would care what it looks like? Places like Cape Cod, Chester County, Chestnut Hill, Gladwyne, places with culture and intellect, a keen eye for beauty, well, sir, ain't gonna wanna look et tha shetin ded ivy! Why they would throw you right out jess fer suggestin it.
 

Del_

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Probably ain't to much TO pay for in NW Gerga that you couldn't do yerself and who would care what it looks like? Places like Cape Cod, Chester County, Chestnut Hill, Gladwyne, places with culture and intellect, a keen eye for beauty, well, sir, ain't gonna wanna look et tha shetin ded ivy! Why they would throw you right out jess fer suggestin it.

The brown ivy is hardly noticeable. But if folks have money to burn they should burn it. Please pass the jelly.
 
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redlawn 78

redlawn 78

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ivy is the worst. Leave it on the tree and it WILL kill the tree. Though birds may like it, so do rats and other vermin.your best bet is to cut it at ground level and pull of as much as u can with your hands. When get to the stems that are tight to tree trunk try using a good size knife (I use a butcher knife ) or something with a thin edge to get between ivy stem and tree bark. pull loose thos ivey stem that dont easily come out entirely . The deadb ivy only looks really bad the first seaso n or so. Clear the ivy on the ground back a little from the truck as well if u can. from that point its just maintenance of keeping it off the tree
 
beastmaster

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With vines you have clingers and stranglers. Ivy over years becomes a strangler. As it takes over a tree it'll compete and win the battle for dominance of the life giving sun. Trees need to have Photosynthesis throu its leave. No sun, no leaves, no food.
On many tree covered in thick vines, when removed the tree appears really sparse only having green where the ivy didn't grow up high and some tips..
If the tree should develop a defect it'll be hiding from view. On some species of oaks that are Succeptable to fungi it can be a breeding ground due to mosture retention.
I personally think ivy should always be cut out of valuable or important trees.
 
romeojk27

romeojk27

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Well, well, well my friends. It appears there's a growing consensus (pun intended) for the removal of the ivy. I don't plan to take any action right away but when I do the plan will be to cut it away at the bottom and let it die off the tree.

If I should do more please chime in. Thanks again!


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TNTreeHugger

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Well, well, well my friends. It appears there's a growing consensus (pun intended) for the removal of the ivy. I don't plan to take any action right away but when I do the plan will be to cut it away at the bottom and let it die off the tree.

If I should do more please chime in. Thanks again!


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I'd pull off as much as I could and toss it in the burn pile - that crap is very hard to kill. I have some vines growing in the fencerow the diameter of my forearm.
 
jpasquini

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I have a white pine tree in the back that has a vine on it, has had it at least 17 years now. The vine is absolutely massive now.... as thick as a small tree itself. The pine tree seems to be doing fine, doesn't appear to be in distress or dying anytime soon. In fact, its doing better than the one next to it, with no vine that had the misfortune of being closed between two pines (there are three in a row).
My only point being well, in some cases they seem to cohabitate quite happily.
 
jomoco

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It depends how close you wanna live to that big of a wildlife refuge, to all sorts of critters?

I don't like poisoning rats, but I do.....

Jomoco
 
TNTreeHugger

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I have a white pine tree in the back that has a vine on it, has had it at least 17 years now. The vine is absolutely massive now.... as thick as a small tree itself. The pine tree seems to be doing fine, doesn't appear to be in distress or dying anytime soon. In fact, its doing better than the one next to it, with no vine that had the misfortune of being closed between two pines (there are three in a row).
My only point being well, in some cases they seem to cohabitate quite happily.
Maybe yours is a "clinger" and not a "strangler." ;)
 
beastmaster

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I have a white pine tree in the back that has a vine on it, has had it at least 17 years now. The vine is absolutely massive now.... as thick as a small tree itself. The pine tree seems to be doing fine, doesn't appear to be in distress or dying anytime soon. In fact, its doing better than the one next to it, with no vine that had the misfortune of being closed between two pines (there are three in a row).
My only point being well, in some cases they seem to cohabitate quite happily.
I'd be Curious to see how much is green from the pine and how much is just the vine supported on a pine tree base. Its almost an impossibility for it to be both. A picture would be nice
 
romeojk27

romeojk27

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I have a white pine tree in the back that has a vine on it, has had it at least 17 years now. The vine is absolutely massive now.... as thick as a small tree itself. The pine tree seems to be doing fine, doesn't appear to be in distress or dying anytime soon. In fact, its doing better than the one next to it, with no vine that had the misfortune of being closed between two pines (there are three in a row).
My only point being well, in some cases they seem to cohabitate quite happily.
Nice to know.

The tree is at the back of my property and does not have any critters that I'm worried about (unless I just don't see them).

Maybe I'll leave well enough alone.

Ladies and gentlemen, voting is back open on what to do!


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ropensaddle

ropensaddle

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Once in the 80s I cut a vine that was 12" dbh, it made the news lol. It seems the kneejerk consensus was I had poisoned the woods as everything in a 1 acre area turned brown. After they were told by me i cut a vine, I was then ridiculed for cutting their wineo vine. They thought many were making wine from it. I then told the idiot no wino is going to climb 90 foot up to get the grapes to make their home made wine with, so I just brought them down to their level. It is so stupid dealing with public anymore its ridiculous. One asked me why i cut it and I said it was because the vine pizzed me off trying to trim and then spending 5 mins each limb cutting the vines off to make the limb fall:eek:
 
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