ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Absolutely disgusted with my sharpening

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by JeffRH, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    15,411
    Likes Received:
    20,592
    Location:
    Minnesota
    There is a tool called a 'stump grinder' . . . . just sayin' . . . .

    Philbert
     
    farmer steve and sixonetonoffun like this.
  2. JeffRH

    JeffRH ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Mass
    Yep did all that, and I chipped away the outer layer of the cut line with a spud bar. Actually did about three-quarters of that stump with that ugly chain I originally posted since I sharpened it last night and it did okay
     
  3. 4seasons

    4seasons ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    763
    Likes Received:
    445
    Location:
    Greeneville, TN
    I will call BS as I have both full chisel and semi chisel that I run on the same saw. Sure a full chisel is faster in clean wood, but it is closer to 30% max, more like 20% most of the time. Like I said before I touch up my chain between every tank of gas. In really rough bark, stuff like dirt, sand, and rocks get caught so that you're cutting the dirt every time you cut bark. It can get really bad on some trees to the point that you have to sharpen between every round.
    Semi chisel holds it edge longer so I use it exclusively when cutting dirty trees. In those it actually cuts faster as you don't have to sharpen as often. But yes as a general rule full chisel is faster and square ground is fastest. But almost no one uses square ground as it won't hold an edge for any amount of time.
    Where you can really get some speed difference is by running an overpowered saw with a short bar and lower rakers on soft wood. But don't try this trick until you get good at reading the wood and knowing what your saw can take.
     
    farmer steve and sixonetonoffun like this.
  4. Tin-knocker

    Tin-knocker ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2017
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    374
    Location:
    Swanton, CA
    Yeah I’m sure in clean softwood the chisel will cut faster but I just have a hard time believing it will cut twice as fast. I use semi but I do a mix of different woods and some are dirty and some are clean. I just think if chisel will actually cut twice as fast then I will have to grab a chain for those rare clean logs that I have access to
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  5. Tin-knocker

    Tin-knocker ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2017
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    374
    Location:
    Swanton, CA
    Thanks for the info. 20% sounds more believable.
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  6. JeffRH

    JeffRH ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Mass
    Certainly not the biggest and best in the world, but it gets the job done. I don't mind the grinding one bit usually, unless it's pine, but I have to get them down to a few inches hit them with the grinder unless I want to be there all day. This style of grinder tends to want to suck you in if the stump is over about 6 in anyway
     

    Attached Files:

    sixonetonoffun and Philbert like this.
  7. Rabid K9

    Rabid K9 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2019
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Perth
    I should clarify that a lot our work is standing, clean timber, that said many of our Australian species are very dense, hard timbers. Chisel excels in these, we don't process many conifers or softwoods, however I find the disparity in cutting speed is less pronounced in some of the big Pinus radiata we deal with. I factor chisel cutting speed into quotes for jobs involving a lot of docking & ripping works. As I said, for big strenuous climbs, the energy saving of having full chisel cutting speed in very significant, it can also be the difference in technique, knowing how fast the chain will go through a certain limb will be a factor in deciding if you spear, step or tear cut a 500kg piece between the blue slate roof, power line & garage containing six antique vehicles....

    I run generally run shorter bars on bigger saws for control, accuracy & fatigue management, along with increased cutting speed.

    We also process a lot of seasoned hardwood (Eucalyptus marginata) for firewood, has been sitting on forest floor for decades, often covered in charcoal, frequently ridden with termites. Still find the full chisel a great deal faster & more efficient in this material, just have to cut smart.

    Nice little MS661, 24" light bar, full chisel, nice seasoned E. marginata log 12-18", pure firewood docking joy.....
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  8. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    1,742
    Location:
    Twin Peaks
    4 has it exactly correct. I have been saying exactly this scenario for many years. In most cases chisel is much slower at every thing because it needs so much attention. Thanks
     
  9. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    1,742
    Location:
    Twin Peaks
    I question that a full chisel will cut 200% of what a semi chisel could cut. Many have said between 20% to 40% increase which I believe is possible. Thanks
     
    Philbert likes this.
  10. ironman_gq

    ironman_gq Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    481
    Location:
    Iron Range MN
    I'd use the chisel chains in the clean wood and buy a handful of semi chisels for stump cutting, they hold up better in dirty wood and are easier to sharpen when you rock one. A sorta sharp semi chisel is still going to be faster than a banged up chisel chain in a stump. It helps to have plenty of chains on hand for that work, when one stops cutting right just swap it out. It'll keep you from cooking your bar and usually keep you from causing more damage to the chain which makes them easier to fix later.
     
    Slackjaw likes this.
  11. Slackjaw

    Slackjaw ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Durham NC
    +1
     
  12. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    15,411
    Likes Received:
    20,592
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Stump cutting is one of the places that carbide chains might make sense.

    Philbert
     
    farmer steve likes this.
  13. Rabid K9

    Rabid K9 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2019
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Perth
    I have a 36" carbide chain living on the expensive useless chainsaw bits shelf with the Stihl petrol drill....

    Meant to live with the stump grinder, but it was that slow & tedious. Have a 880 with 30" full chisel as the allocated stumping saw instead. Find the .404 chain stays sharp in dirty wood much longer than the 3/8 on the mid size saws. Broader bar tend to track straighter than the light bars running on other saws, so we can leave a nice flat finishing cut of stumps not being ground.

    Makes short work of some big, nasty stumps.
     
    Philbert and Del_ like this.
  14. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    15,411
    Likes Received:
    20,592
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Which model / brand of carbide chain?

    On another forum we delved into some of the differences between brands and models, etc., so that would be helpful to know.

    (If you were States-side I would encourage you to list some of that stuff in the 'Trading Post'!)

    Thanks.

    Philbert
     
  15. Rabid K9

    Rabid K9 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2019
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Perth
    Stihl chain - Rapid Duro I believe. Used once, likely never again.

    I buy the Stihl chain by the roll in all the sizes from 3/8"P up, the carbide one was a special order for some big dirty stumps.

    The petrol drill (BT45) appeared to be a good thing, but unfortunately just doesn't have the torque to compete with the 18 & 36v li-ion in my view. Bought for fencing & heavy 'lumber' drilling - just can't do it.

    But am digressing from original thread....
     
    Philbert likes this.

Share This Page