ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


  1. Please see this post Click Here Please ask questions if you have them!! I hope this is going to be great for us all.
    Dismiss Notice

Advice trimming branches with Mistletoe

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by John from Cle Elum, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. John from Cle Elum

    John from Cle Elum At some point a decision will have to be made.

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hi
    I am in Washington State. I have a couple of Doug Fir with Dwarf Mistletoe in some of the lower branches. The broom has not spread to the trunk. Aside from the mistletoe the trees look healthy. These are some substantial trees (20" dia) that I would rather not loose. The branches are the lowest branches on the trees but they are still about 25' up. What is the best way to trim the branches. Climb with spikes (never done it), rope saw, ladder, really long pole saw, or ????.

    Any idea's would be appreciated.

    John
     
  2. Del_

    Del_ Life is but a song we sing.

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2002
    Messages:
    23,968
    Likes Received:
    4,018
    Location:
    N/E GA
    Rope climb.
     
  3. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2011
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    345
    Location:
    front range rockies, Colorado
    I deal with a lot of dwarf mistletoe. (Here it's on Ponderosa Pine.) Unless you're an accomplished climber--and even if you are--I would use a pole saw from the ground if you can. Saves time and effort.

    Maybe you need a pole saw for just a few limbs, but if you have much use for one you'll want to spend enough for a quality blade. The homeowner made-in-China blade will cut a few limbs, and maybe the extending handle will serve, but for regular work you'll want better. I have two pole saws--one is a Stihl, and the other (that I prefer) is a homeowner handle modified to take a Silky blade--that thing will cut!

    Dunno if you're a pro or not, but when removing a limb from a tree you want to cut just outside the branch collar rather than flush to the bole of the tree.
     
  4. John from Cle Elum

    John from Cle Elum At some point a decision will have to be made.

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Washington State
    Lucky for me mistletoe does NOT spread between species. I only have the Doug fir kind in a mixed stand. Having two feet on the the ground, even standing on the roof of a truck, sounds good to me. What is the reach on the homebuilt and the Stihl? I will invest in what ever works and is safest. I am assuming both are not powered.
     
  5. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2011
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    345
    Location:
    front range rockies, Colorado
    The Stihl is 21' long. Being 6'2" with long arms, I cut limbs pretty near 30' up. And then it's stand on the pickup--I've even cut from the roof of the pickup--they don't teach that in class. But past that it's climbing. I'm going to climb and remove mistletoe tomorrow from a Pondo.

    I had a powered polesaw once and didn't like it. It's awkward to use, and its reach isn't long enough.

    My cobbled-together pole saw is a fiberglass extendable handle that only reaches 15', but its Silky blade is something else. Silky is what you want in a hand-powered saw. (Their pole saws are overpriced, however.)
     
  6. John from Cle Elum

    John from Cle Elum At some point a decision will have to be made.

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Washington State
    I will be looking to buy a used Stihl. I would rather stand on a truck that climb a tree. That will take care of most of my issues.

    Not a pro but I have ten acres of forest that need attention.
     
  7. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1,133
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Location:
    Twin Peaks
    I often go 60' with just a sling shot. My homemade rope saw seems to get it done every time. Not sure what you can buy that won't break under a good load. Thanks
     
    Husky Man likes this.
  8. John from Cle Elum

    John from Cle Elum At some point a decision will have to be made.

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Washington State
    Ted
    What do you use for a cutter on that rope saw?
    John
     
  9. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2011
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    345
    Location:
    front range rockies, Colorado
    So it's almost a rule in this business--no ladders. With good reason. People go up on a ladder, cut a limb, which swings down and knocks them off the ladder and into the ER.

    But today, for instance, I was preparing to set a climb line when the homeowner said "I've got a ladder--you can get up there with that." Which was the best approach, quicker and easier entrance to the tree, which had plenty of limbs for climbing. And the whole job was in a 40--50' tree. I do not cut from a ladder, but for entrance to the tree I sometimes forget that it's a time saver. It's something else to consider. Once you're in the tree, however, you want to be tied in for work--saddle, etc.
     
  10. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1,133
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Location:
    Twin Peaks
    I have been using 3/8 chain. To get the chain to cut with out binding has been a challenge with plenty of trial and error. I often use two 100' 1/4 or 3/8 line to get to most accesses. Its for those jobs that seem to need a special touch. Climbing in some cases is much faster, but when there is a reason not to it is the way to go. Thanks
     
  11. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1,133
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Location:
    Twin Peaks
    Yeah I had a tree removal that was moving with red ants. Climbing was a nightmare so with a ladder it made getting up the tree doable. Thanks
     
  12. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    2,944
    Likes Received:
    2,218
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Species of mistletoe are victim species specific, however there are several species of mistletoe.

    If you have a taller stem that is infected, you should look at smaller stems of the same species within 50' radius of the infected tree. The seeds from the infection shoot out of the mistletoe 'plant' and can travel a fair distance.
     
    beastmaster likes this.
  13. John from Cle Elum

    John from Cle Elum At some point a decision will have to be made.

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Washington State
    I have not seen any more mistletoe on anything nearby. It is the only Doug fir within 100ft. I did have a cluster of mistletoe on another part of the property. It hit only Doug firs in a stand of mainly pines. They were turned into firewood .
     

Share This Page