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after how many gas tank to mill

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by Muzzleblastm38, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. Muzzleblastm38

    Muzzleblastm38 ArboristSite Lurker

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    ok with a new ms660 clone kit how many gas tank before i can start milling
     
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  2. ammoaddict

    ammoaddict Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I would just heat cycle it a few times and start milling.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
     
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  3. EchoRomeoCharlie

    EchoRomeoCharlie ArboristSite Operative

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    1 tank of regular cutting.
    1 tank of idling for 15 seconds or so every 30 seconds of milling
    1 tank of idling for 15 seconds or so every 1 minute of milling
    1 tank of idling for 15 seconds every 5 minutes of milling

    Then just mill like the dickens.

    This is just what came to my mind...I've never done this nor do I know if it would help at all....but it sounds good to me.
     
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  4. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    The Chihls break in quick. Or they break...
     
  5. motolife313

    motolife313 ArboristSite Guru

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    I’ve heard heat cycles are for the gaskets on dirtbikes.
     
  6. stihl_lyfe

    stihl_lyfe ArboristSite Lurker

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    I started wailing on mine after the third tank. Probably a little early because it kept getting stronger for at least another couple of tanks.
     
  7. Brent Nowell

    Brent Nowell ArboristSite Guru

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    Break in hoo haw is just that.
    Rings seat equally as well with or without the procedure. Balls to the wall with the saw, tune it accordingly and the rings will seat sooner.
    Milling is the best way to break in a saw, I have done it to three mine back when I got em and they pull nice and strong.
     
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  8. csmillingnoob

    csmillingnoob ArboristSite Member

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    I ran five tanks of rich (25:1) fuel though my last new Chin saw. Had a lot of bucking to do anyway.

    Then, I re-tuned it (down a few rpms), changed my oil mix to my usual 40:1, cleaned up my sparkplug, lowered my rakers and started milling big hardwood.

    Did it matter to the saw? I dunno, but it made me feel more confident in the saw before I ever stuck it 32 inches through a pecan log
     
  9. BlackCoffin

    BlackCoffin ArboristSite Operative

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    Heat seats the rings quicker. I get a load on my saws and bury the bar. Get them hot and work then hard. Sounds like milling should do the trick! Out a tank of fuel through it then give it the business. Milling is hard on stuff anyway, don’t think a soft break in will make any difference haha.
     
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  10. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    When I bought my brand new 660 I asked the dealer if milling would void the warranty, he said no. I asked for 25', 36", and 47" bars. Whatever Stihls closest to 48" was. He said he could do the 25 and 36, but if I wanted the 4 foot bar I'd have to come back the next day. If he sold the 4 foot with the saw that would void the warranty. I asked how long to break it in for milling. He said put it on the mill first, start it up and by the time you get it squared up on the rails it will be ready. I have had zero issues with it. I cut about ten cord of wood with the 25" bar per year and mill a few Oaks every year with it. I milled with it a lot the first few years, now I have too many stacks of air drying wood around the house.
     
  11. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    If the saw is tuned for milling, and the tuning is checked after a couple of tanks of fuel, and quality lube is used the saw can be used straight away for milling. If it's used outta the box without being tuned for milling and you hit a wide, long hard log then you could have a problem BUT that could be the case even with a couple of hundred hours of bucking only on the saw.

    Before milling I ran 4 or 5 tanks of fuel on my new 880 just while bucking but I alter found out it was unnecessary. I've also heard of using 25:1 and then 35:1 and then 50:1 when running in a saw which is nonsense in my book.
     
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  12. ammoaddict

    ammoaddict Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I think the whole break-in thing is un necessary. Any new saw I have ever bought, I fired it up, let it idle a few minutes and started cutting. Never had any problems.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
     
  13. Brent Nowell

    Brent Nowell ArboristSite Guru

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    My 95cc gets about 4 or 5 passes I believe before she starts leaning out. That’s live wood 2” thick at about 7’ long and probably 14” wide. This includes idling time in between cuts and setting up of the jig for the next pass
     

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