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ANSI standards question

Discussion in 'Commercial Tree Care and Climbing' started by jtc16, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. jtc16

    jtc16 ArboristSite Guru

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    Does anyone know if ansi standards say anything about tying into a point that is too high for the climber to reach the ground using ddrt with the length of the rope, so they would have to spur down and re-tie in order to reach the ground.
     
  2. jefflovstrom

    jefflovstrom It was a beautiful day!

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    Are you pruning with spikes on? Anyway,ANSI does say you will be tied in when ascending and descending. Use the proper length of rope.
    Jeff
     
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  3. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    If you care about ANSI standards, you are not climbing on spikes...

    To the question, the only thing I see in Z133 is 8.1.14
    "When an arborist is working at heights greater than one-half the length of the arborist climbing line, a stopper knot shall be tied int he end of the arborist climbing line to prevent pulling the line through the climbing hitch."

    So, it sounds like it is acceptable to do that, per the standard. I think it sounds like a bad idea. If you need to get out quick, you are in quite the pickle.
     
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  4. DSW

    DSW ArboristSite Guru

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    Working solo, injury, a long day could get longer in a hurry.
     
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  5. jtc16

    jtc16 ArboristSite Guru

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    I had a tree service where climbed alone for 1 1/2 years. I had to go out of business and got rid of my equipment. I never used spikes if the tree or limb was not being removed and I always used the proper length of rope. I work for line clearance company now and was told that I shrugged off when I asked for a longer rope because I would have to un-tie and re-tie to come down. They only provide 120' lengths and my foreman told me that he would "inquire" about a longer rope, which I'm pretty sure means he's in no hurry to get one. I was just trying to figure out if I could find an ansi standard (which the company supposedly follows) proving that I need the rope to speed up the process of getting one. If the standard only says tied in while ascending and descending and to have a stopper knot I guess re-tying is technically not against policy. My foreman definitely wants us to spike up the tree to set a tie-in instead of using the big shot until we have a successful tie-in point (like I have always done), by "must be tied in while ascending and descending surely ansi means a climb line not tied in with a lanyard? I'm not trying to make too big of a fuss, just wanting a longer rope to be provided to me. And yeah, we definitely use spikes to trim at work.
     
  6. jefflovstrom

    jefflovstrom It was a beautiful day!

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    Climb line set and lanyard , correct. Spikes do not change that.
    Jeff
     
  7. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Unfortunately spikes are common for utility clearance. They were getting ready to spike my neighbor's ash that I have been helping keep alive for 10+ years. We asked them not to. Those 2 guys packed up and left - I was betting to try again when neither of us were around, but the next day a different climber came and climbed spikeless.

    I'm not sure this crew (Tree Core) even pretends to follow the Z133. Aside from spiking trees that didn't need spiked, they did a decent job with the pruning from what I have seen around town...

    As for your situation - on one hand, you don't want to sound too needy as a new employee. On the other hand, if you are asking for another $50 in rope to be (and feel) a lot safer and they refuse, I'd start to wonder whether they've got your back when it really matters....

    Regarding spiking prunes...that is a big worm hole. Here is what the ANSI A300 Part 1 8.2.2.2 says:
    Climbing spurs shall not be used when entering and climbing trees for the purpose of pruning or other tree maintenance, except in situations where other means are impractical such as:
    *Remote/rural utility rights-of-way;
    *When branches are more than throw-line distance apart and there is no other means of climbing the tree;
    *When outer bark is thick enough to prevent damage to teh inner bark or cambium; and,
    *Emergency operations

    That first bullet point I'm sure inspires a lot of creative interpretation. Is a tree in somebody's back yard, but 80' off of a road and sidewalk, but not accessible by a traditional bucket (but a compact lift could reach) "remote" or "rural"??? As I said, the tree was climbed and pruned by a competent climber without spikes...
     
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