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Anti Vibration gloves

glennschumann

glennschumann

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Hi All,

Does anybody here have any good experiences with anti vibration gloves?

I've got a 009 (Please don't laugh - it has made good money for me in the past, and now that I'm getting laid off this coming Friday, I hope to be making more with it) and when ever I use it for extended periods, my left hand goes numb because it doesn't have AV mounts. Stihl has some AV gloves for $25 to 30, but I don't know if that will help. I'd prefer to upgrade to a MS211, but that just isn't in the budget right now.

Does anybody have any good experiences with AV gloves that they can recommend?

Thanks
 
TreePointer

TreePointer

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I cut for a summer with an MS290 and regular Husqvarna chainsaw gloves. I'd feel the vibrations all evening and awaken the next morning still feeling it a little. Not fun.

The Stihl antivibration gloves actually make a difference for me, and I use them with other outdoor power equipment in addition to chainsaws.

Oh yeah, I also replaced the 290 with a 361. :)
 
CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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I like atlas 300 and 330 gloves. While not strictly antivibe, they go a good job at damping felt vibrations while still providing good dexterity. I use them for weedwackers, mowers and chainsaws and they do help. They hold up well to just about everything except ropes and you can wash them. They are also cheap. If you shop online you can purchase them buy the dozen for about $2 bucks a pair. Most hardware stores carry them for about $5. They will help with the vibes but if you are going to do a lot of cutting, you really need to get into a saw that has decent anti-vibe.
 
TreePointer

TreePointer

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I like atlas 300 and 330 gloves. While not strictly antivibe, they go a good job at damping felt vibrations while still providing good dexterity. I use them for weedwackers, mowers and chainsaws and they do help. They hold up well to just about everything except ropes and you can wash them. They are also cheap. If you shop online you can purchase them buy the dozen for about $2 bucks a pair. Most hardware stores carry them for about $5. They will help with the vibes but if you are going to do a lot of cutting, you really need to get into a saw that has decent anti-vibe.

:agree2:

That's the best upgrade I ever made with ***. Pro saws rule! They are worth the extra cash for the high volume sawyer.
 
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stihlaficionado

stihlaficionado

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I cut for a summer with an MS290 and regular Husqvarna chainsaw gloves. I'd feel the vibrations all evening and awaken the next morning still feeling it a little. Not fun.

The Stihl antivibration gloves actually make a difference for me, and I use them with other outdoor power equipment in addition to chainsaws.

Oh yeah, I also replaced the 290 with a 361. :)

I also bought the Stihl AV gloves. I can't stand them as they are way too bulky. Now I do have large hands and this may have made the situation worse. But I rarely use them now...so I have a pair of XL Stihl gloves available:)
 

pgg

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Hi All,

Does anybody here have any good experiences with anti vibration gloves?

I've got a 009 (Please don't laugh - it has made good money for me in the past, and now that I'm getting laid off this coming Friday, I hope to be making more with it) and when ever I use it for extended periods, my left hand goes numb because it doesn't have AV mounts. Stihl has some AV gloves for $25 to 30, but I don't know if that will help. I'd prefer to upgrade to a MS211, but that just isn't in the budget right now.

Does anybody have any good experiences with AV gloves that they can recommend?

Thanks


Wow, if it's an 009 you'll have to wear at least 8 pairs of gloves at a time, and only run the saw for a one minute burst once every ten minutes. That should limit the severe nerve-damage the good ole 009 always dishes out to anyone running it by about one or two percent

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JustinM

JustinM

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As others have mentioned, my own experience with anti-vibe gloves is that they help - a little - but not a ton. I originally bought them for my wife who complained about the trimmer making her arms numb...they were on sale ($13 instead of $26 or something) so i bought myself a pair too.

I try not to use any of my non-AV saws for long but when I do I always do wear the anti-AV gloves now. I can feel the difference - if only for a short time (ie 1 tank of gas or similar). My pair is actually sold as an automotive anti-vibe glove, but the gel pads seem to be the same basic principle.

If you're going to use them now and again, its probably worth it. If you're going to try to stop or limit anti-vibe, you need to upgrade saws imho.
 
glennschumann

glennschumann

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Thanks folks! Thanks for all the suggestions!

I tried the Stihl gloves on at the dealer, and I did think they were bulky, but I could get my hand around a saw... but it was different... would take some getting used to.

Yes, I agree, that the best solution is a saw with AV... I've got my wedding coming in 3 weeks, so I'd like to feel my new ring with my left hand, and I'd also like to mindful of the budget for the celebration with my employment ending in 4 days... I may be able to pick up a few cutting jobs in the next few weeks, so I'm just trying to be appropriate with everything.

Funny thing is that she said she would let me put a new MS211 on the wedding registry... You are invited if you want to bring that... : )
 
B_Turner

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I have a few pairs of the Youngstown anti-vibe gloves. I love them. I dont use them for cutting, but I use them for splitting.

I have some youngstown gloves and they are well made and fit me well. But with the anit vibe model esp the material in the palm and finger area got harder and therefore slicker and I quit using them much as it was a little harder to grasp the tool/saw.

Might of been bar oil getting on them over time, perhaps, that cause the hardening.

For chainsawing, except for the durability and expense issues, for me nothing beats a high quality supple leather glove. Great grip and the leather reduces the high frequency vibes well. (My saws are very low vibes except my 066 and 880.)

For chainsawing lately I have been mostly using my atlas gloves with the double rubber. After a little break in they work well (and hold up very well to ropes, etc) although the surface texture wears away faster than ideal.

I have a number of more serious "anti vibe" gloves for various applications. Various degrees of padding or gel in the palms, but none of mine really have much thickness in the finger pad areas.

With some of my buzzier tools I really wish there was a little extra something in the fingerpad area. Not real thick to interfer with grapsing, but something to reduce the high frequency short throw vibration some grinders,etc make.
 
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Slamm

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Hands down, the best Anti-Vibe gloves are the Hulkster Gloves .... google it. You can get them mail order through Shubee's. I wear them for driving the skidders and running the chainsaws. Order Extra Large if you have medium sized hands on up, as my wife has normal hands and they work for her and I they fit me fine too. They are tight on the wrist to keep chips out of the palm area, they are really tough, they are the best cable pulling gloves I have worn .... much better than the best leather gloves as far as hand protection.

I have some pairs that are 2 years old in logging. I order several pairs and rotate them out as they get wet or at noontime. They are about $13 bucks so you don't cry if you loose them like an expensive pair of leather gloves, but they protect and work much better than cheap leather gloves.

I saw similiar gloves at Stihl for about 19-20 dollars, and these are the same glove.

That is what I use.

Sam
 
Philbert

Philbert

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AV Gloves?

Ya''ll are kidding right?

Right??

Vibration exposure is like hearing loss - it creeps up on you and it is cumulative. It is usually permanent.

There are some funny sounding names for some of the conditions. The simplest is 'white finger': where the circulation in your hands becomes so messed up that the skin in your palm quickly blanches as white as paper, and it is accompanied by loss of feeling, loss of grip strength, etc. More information below:

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/97-141/ergotxt5c.html

Because these problems are also associated with cold exposure, loggers in the north woods running older chainsaws were especially prone to these conditions.

As noted, some saws vibrate less. Vibration can also be reduced by keeping the saw in good running condition; using a low-vibe chain; keeping the bar smooth and the chain sharp and evenly filed or ground, and using A/V gloves.

Note that most 'anti-vibration' gloves are not; they are usually gel-filled or padded anti-impact gloves, and are sold as A/V, but only dampen a small amount of the vibration. There are standards for A/V gloves that only a small number of manufacturers actually test to (EN ISO 10819 and ANSI S2.73-2002 (R 2007) / ISO 10819:1996). Because these gloves typically sell for $30 - $40 per pair, it is hard to get people to buy them unless they have an existing problem.

http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/vibration/vibration_measure.html


Philbert
 
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Philbert

Philbert

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Go to www.galeton.com they have all types of gloves. I bought a pair of "Hulk" gloves for around $10.00. Item #9100-950

Those look identical to the STIHL $25 gloves except for the color (and the price!).
http://www.stihlusa.com/apparel/anti-vibration-gloves.html

Also the Impacto BlackMaxx
http://www.impacto.ca/catalog.php?item=1339

People in the industry that I have talked with say that these are an economical alternative that offer some vibration dampening, but not as much as some of the gloves that meet the standards.

I have tried some of these, and subjectively, they do appear to offer some vibration relief. I also like that they let your fingers flex easily to operate saw controls. But they do not hold up well to tossing firewood, so if you use them with your saw, keep a pair of leather gloves handy for other tasks.

Philbert
 
Slamm

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It is my experience after buying most every type of glove there is and using/testing them in logging as a cutter and with a cable skidder that these gloves are the best value if not the best glove period for logging and firewood related work, and unless some place new has shown up, the below link is the cheapest link for them.

Most men and larger woman will use the X-Large size and they will fit. My wife is 5' 9" and wears the x-Large same as the rest of the guys that are 5' 5" on up.

Hulk Anti-Vibration Gloves #9100950

Hulkster or Hulk Gloves and even Stihl recently last couple of years came out with some similar styled ones, but the cheapest I could get them for was $15ish.

No other gloves gives you the super human grip that these do when working with firewood, you can just palm a lot of big chunks with them one handed.
They are by far the best cable skidding and heavy machine operating gloves I have used.
They give a great grip on the saw and I can work the flippy caps or regular caps and sharpen chains all day without taking them off. They are cheap enough that if you loose them you won't cry, but they out perform $50 per pair gloves, and no leather glove can come close in performance.

That is my experience with them and they are the only glove that myself and the guys that work with me will use, provided its not about 20F or lower. After that we use the Cabela's 100 gram insulated DeerSkin gloves that have Goretex in them and are very tough and warm, but cost about $40, but have lasted through 2 winters.

Sam
 
Jacob J.

Jacob J.

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Vibration exposure is like hearing loss - it creeps up on you and it is cumulative. It is usually permanent.

There are some funny sounding names for some of the conditions. The simplest is 'white finger': where the circulation in your hands becomes so messed up that the skin in your palm quickly blanches as white as paper, and it is accompanied by loss of feeling, loss of grip strength, etc.


Philbert

A lot of it has to do with the accumulation of scar tissue in the fine capillaries and veins that service the hands and arms.
I worked with some ex-Navy divers and they all had terrible problems in their hands and feet from years of decompression
sickness and the build-up of gases in their extremities damaging the capillary networks. A few had extreme early-onset
Osteoarthritis because of this.
B-vitamins will help for most people and some have good results eating gelatin as a part of their regular diet.
 
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