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Any drawbacks to carbide chain

noodlewalker

noodlewalker

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Put a log horizontal, square up the end to be like a cant, then make 3 cuts down up down note the time. Change to various other chains and do similar. If you do not have a timing system a video generally will have a counter.

Then find a hardwood tree and cut off branches in a manner in line with the trunk like to make the log round. If I recall this is where quite a difference seems to exist but isn't something that can be timed and compared easily if at all.
I've got a tree in the back I want to take down. Roughly 13" or so diameter, but forks at ground level, so basically two trunks, I'll knock it down when the weather here straightens out. I think it's an ash, but that's a guess. It should be a good test tree. I'll take it down and see what it feels like. Maybe grab some video on a few cuts.
 
buttercup

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It's on its way to me, I figured for 35 and some change, I can afford to give it a test run.... I don't really know how to go about "testing" it though. Just run it through some wood? Should I set up some scenarios? Any suggestions? Anybody interested in video of it?
I would think the most notable difference is how long the chain stays sharp compared to any regular chain, so I guess testing would be somewhat of a long term project.
I wouldn't try to wear out the sharpness of any chain just to do that, perhaps just start using it and try to compare with your experience after some time. And report back here of course :chop:
 
Mike in Tx

Mike in Tx

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I would think the most notable difference is how long the chain stays sharp compared to any regular chain, so I guess testing would be somewhat of a long term project.
I wouldn't try to wear out the sharpness of any chain just to do that, perhaps just start using it and try to compare with your experience after some time. And report back here of course :chop:
My experience using MS250 and then going to a MS462.
Stihl green box & yellow box Regular chain vs Stihl Carbide chain.
Clearing land for 28yrs. Mainly cedar and trimming up oaks. Shallow soil, limestone, limestone rocks.
Cutting stumps flush at ground I have noticed the regular chainsaw blades dull after the 2nd to 3rd stump, depending on the size.
As long as I keep the carbide chain coated with bar oil, my carbide chain will stay sharp for the short winter season. Maybe cutting 10-20 cedar trees. I mainly use the regular chain for removing limbs and the carbide blade to cut the stumps.
 
noodlewalker

noodlewalker

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I would think the most notable difference is how long the chain stays sharp compared to any regular chain, so I guess testing would be somewhat of a long term project.
I wouldn't try to wear out the sharpness of any chain just to do that, perhaps just start using it and try to compare with your experience after some time. And report back here of course :chop:
That was kind of my thoughts on it. I like to keep my chain sharp as I am cutting so I file it basically Evey couple of tanks (generally) so I will have to just cut the tree as I typically would without filing and see the point where I start to notice it.
 
noodlewalker

noodlewalker

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My experience using MS250 and then going to a MS462.
Stihl green box & yellow box Regular chain vs Stihl Carbide chain.
Clearing land for 28yrs. Mainly cedar and trimming up oaks. Shallow soil, limestone, limestone rocks.
Cutting stumps flush at ground I have noticed the regular chainsaw blades dull after the 2nd to 3rd stump, depending on the size.
As long as I keep the carbide chain coated with bar oil, my carbide chain will stay sharp for the short winter season. Maybe cutting 10-20 cedar trees. I mainly use the regular chain for removing limbs and the carbide blade to cut the stumps.
I'm glad I asked this question, I see a lot of different experiences, and some similarities between those experiences. Stump work seems to be where it actually excells in real life situations. I actually thought about getting one for milling which is what started me down this rabbit hole. I wanted to buy a 42" carbide chain, but they are expensive as hell, so I started researching them, then found one that is shorter, but affordable and figured I would try it before I ruined one that was substantially more cost.
 
Remle

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Pickup a carbide circular saw blade. They’re cheap and common and will give you a taste of what their performance is like. They’re way tougher than regular steel, but they’re not invincible and they don’t cut as well as sharp steel. You can still break off teeth and ruin carbide blades, but at the same time they will cut a few nails or Sheetrock screws before they are shot.
 
noodlewalker

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Well it finally got delivered. It looks pretty good to me, but what do I know I guess?? It's really sharp and seems to be high quality. I made sure to sanitize it completely though!! I'll get it into some wood tomorrow and report back 773397f0-3a86-4ba6-a8e3-e86c71c299c5.jpg 72cea081-9ffe-4aca-b5f9-49e040439527.jpg c0f4df9d-6108-43ad-809e-c465cd6e2b69.jpg
 
Justsaws

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That looks similar to the type of chain folks are running on saws like the MS250. Hope it works out for you.

I think that the similar chain from Stihl was around $70.00, maybe more.
 
noodlewalker

noodlewalker

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That looks similar to the type of chain folks are running on saws like the MS250. Hope it works out for you.

I think that the similar chain from Stihl was around $70.00, maybe more.
Well it was ordered from a place in "California" I'm pretty sure it came from China considering that is what the box says and the amount of time to get here. I personally don't care either way, but it upsets me when people mislead consumers by saying "shipped from America" or "American supply". However, if it is worthwhile, I will probably buy a larger reel of it and make one for all of my bars. I will hopefully be able to see today if the forecasted rain/snow holds off long enough.
 
noodlewalker

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Well I threw it on my saw today, the width of the chain is .058, and I didn't realize my bar is .063... That being said, I figured 5/1000ths wouldn't hurt, so I ran it anyway. I took down an ash (I think) last weekend that was leaning pretty bad and bucked it up. Here is the carbide chain on a 20 doing some rip cuts and a couple of cross cuts. I think it performs pretty well. It cost me just over 35 dollars, 22 Ish for the chain and 13ish to ship.
 
noodlewalker

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It is starting to snow now so I am going to pack it up for the day... Here is my fair and accurate review of it. I have spent the day basically halving the larger logs from the bulk of 2 moderate sized trees. The chain is surprisingly still fairly sharp. I know I hit the dirt a few times and possibly caught a nail once. I have so far not lost any teeth. For the most part it is still dropping out chips rather than fines, but on the last few cuts it started moving slightly crooked towards the bottom of the cut..... All in all I am happy with it and as yet have no way to sharpen it, but my fair assessment is that I have cut a lot more wood without sharpening than I would have with a standard chain, and that was my goal. I think that I will order a bulk reel and make a loop for my 42" bar and see what it does in a milling application.
 

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