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Anyone dabble in Blacksmithing?

Haywire Haywood

Haywire Haywood

Fiscal Conservative Social Retard
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
6,316
Location
Kentucky
Yea, I've abandoned the coffee can forge. I have a grill with sand and homemade firebrick at the moment using lump charcoal. I tried using my shop vac for a blower but it's way too much for my setup. I'm looking for a yard sale hair dryer.
 
Stihl 041S

Stihl 041S

Tree Freak
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
14,447
Age
67
Location
Quaker Valley
I love working with metal. Titanium is fun too, but it is not the same as blacksmithing. I took some college courses while in highschool. So far a major point has been missed. If you use gas of any kind the metal will not change. The whole point of blacksmithing is to change the composition of the metal into steel. When the masters made Samurai swords they started with your basic pig iron and turned the metal into an amazing piece of fuctional art. I spent some time making things out of files, but files already have quite of bit of carbon in them. They can make pretty decent knives, but nothing compared to the Japanese steel. Rebar on the other hand is the worst steel there is. It is often an array of misc. junk melted together. So if you take mild steel and heat it up with wood especially hardwood then you transform the metal into high grade steel. With the Japanese steel they would heat up the metal hundreds of times with wood and then quench it just right. After that process they would then temper it thus making a very funtionable weapon. Thanks
All true. But you will get very little carbon in mild steel. Takes a lot to get good steel.
The Japanese also have open hearth. Not poured steel.
So their steel gets carbon during the smelting. The surface of the tiny bits of steel have carbon. Lots of surface area for the weight.
1% Carbon is considered High Carbon.
You are right. It’s an art.
 
crowbuster

crowbuster

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Dec 31, 2007
Messages
750
Location
Indiana
Haywire. Look up blacksmith knife. Neat and fun to make. Even put ur own twist on it so to speak. I sell enough stuff to buy more steel, cant quit my day job just yet.. haha Go with the lighter hammer, last thing you want is bad form and to develop tennis elbow or something else. Good luck and have fun. Wear those safety glasses. That scale flies everywhere
 
Haywire Haywood

Haywire Haywood

Fiscal Conservative Social Retard
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
6,316
Location
Kentucky
I'm still trying to draw out steel to make nails consistantly. Tried a small scroll yesterday and was only partially successful. I'm a long long way from banging out a knife. I'll post some pics tomorrow.
 
Haywire Haywood

Haywire Haywood

Fiscal Conservative Social Retard
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
6,316
Location
Kentucky
My makeshift forge and the anvil I picked up. It's about 10" too low. I'm looking for a taller and wider piece of oak to mount it on. My nails aren't worth posting. anvil.jpg forge.jpg
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
2,494
Age
68
Location
Twin Peaks
Hay I have had much better success building a oven as opposed to an open hearth design. You do not have to use mortar if you do not want. A roman arch has worked well for me and has sped up the heating process by least 500%. Things get heated up more even too. Thanks
 
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