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Are "chainsaw gloves" really just gentleman's driving gloves?

bfrazier

bfrazier

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Vibration related injuries (including: 'white finger', ' hand-arm vibration syndrome', 'Raynaud's Phenomenon', and others) are believed to be cumulative. Similar to hearing loss.

With short-term exposure, especially when younger, the symptoms go away. But with heavier or continued exposure, the damage becomes permanent and irreversible. Chainsaws were notorious for both vibration and hearing damage. It is why A/V mounts were invented. A better running chainsaw and properly sharpened chain help. But I strongly encourage anyone noticing these symptoms to look into good A/V gloves when using any vibrating tool. Hearing protection too.

Philbert
I too struggle with vibration related injuries in my hands.
I could never get use to the big pillow type anti-vibe gloves.
If vibration is the issue, some low vibration chain is a good idea, like the Stihl RS (Rapid Super) Series - great for professional use, but lower vibration. And keep those depth guages (rakers) right.

antivibration.png
 
The Lorax

The Lorax

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I have some inflatable antivibe gloves that you pump up like the old reebok shoes.
I don't wear them, too bulky.
I do limit my use of vibrating tools to short periods, one of the worst was a mulching blade for a brushcutter that made my hands tingle for an hour afterwards.
I have ordered a three bladed unit to try and reduce the vibes.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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I have some inflatable antivibe gloves that you pump up like the old reebok shoes.
I remember seeing some gloves like that almost 30 years ago! The A/V gloves that I like have tiny little air bubbles in them, kind of like bubble wrap. Made by 'Impacto'. Several styles available.

Philbert
 
Philbert

Philbert

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You can see the impressions of the small, air bubbles through the leather of the glove on the Left, after many years of use. The glove on the Right, also has the small, air bubbles, in a different style.

For some reason, the thumbs were much longer on one style glove, of the same size, by the same manufacturer (?). I had to trim it down on the Hi-Viz pair so that I could operate the 'Master Control Lever' on STIHL saws!

Impacto Gloves.jpg

Philbert
 
The Lorax

The Lorax

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Well the tri-blade mulch blade arrived yesterday and I put it on my 40cc Tanaka brushcutter to see if it would make any difference, Its a lot smoother than the twin blade, no tingling anymore. Line on a 40cc just doesn't last any time at all.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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I'm 64 and climbed from 18 till I got my knees replaced, 4 years ago. I never wore gloves. When climbing they are dangerous. You think you have a grip on something, and whoops, there goes a 20 pound dead limb, over the slate roof on a multi million dollar house. Or, you swing from one lead in a tree over to another, and whoops, thought I had a grip on it, as you swing back to slam into the trunk. I did have a Homelite Super 1050 kick back on me while bucking up 36" Tulip Poplar logs. It got my left pinky, ring finger, and the one next to it. The only difference if I had of been wearing the canvas gloves available back then, they would have had to pick little pieces of canvas out of the cut. As it was I wrapped my hand up with my handkerchief and kept working. Several years ago SVK gave me a pair of Kevlar gloves and I use them whenever I'm sharpening a chain, and now that my hands are soft, I use them stacking split firewood. Stops all of the splinters. Just for chainsaw work, I'd get a pair of really tight gloves. The ones Steve gave me are a size too small, they are hard to get on, and harder to get off. I occasionally use them while cutting.
 
rwoods

rwoods

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Like Joe, almost 40 years ago I cut my left hand and three of my fingers just at the first knuckle in a kick back from an old gear drive McCulloch with a pulpwood bow. Could have lost half my hand but was saved by the chain guard. Also could have lost my head but was saved by a proper stance. Anyway, just a slight overlap of my ring finger over the pinky and no other lasting injury. Since then I have parked the bow saw and started wearing gloves - for years principally deer skin drivers as they handle wet conditions well. Elk skin is tougher but I can no longer find any affordable ones. Jump to last year, I didn't have any gloves so I borrowed a pair of knit gloves that had been dipped in something (they may have been branded Stihl). They wear much better handling firewood than the leather and keep you hands warm and dry. Our woodlot has plenty so they keep me covered. As to anti-vibe, the Stihl gloves are expensive and not designed to handle firewood. I have an old non a/v MAC that I use for fun sometimes. One tank of gas and my left hand is done. But put on a jersey glove and then one of the dipped gloves over that and I get tired before my hand goes numb.

Ron
 
oldfortyfive

oldfortyfive

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Vibration from snow blowers has caused much of my hand, wrist and elbow issues. I wear the Stihl antivibration glove and tennis elbow wraps when running saws and blowers now.
Another useful piece of PPE are the Kevlar arm sleeves. Cooler in the summer than long sleeve shirts.
 
TimberWolf530

TimberWolf530

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I use the cheapest leather gloves I can get for firewood because I'm going to wear them out quick no matter how much they cost. I usually get the $7 ones at Menards. For the longest time I couldn't figure out why my left glove keeps wearing out first. Then it hit me, I operate my splitter with my right hand and toss the splits with my left. Anyway, I rarely wear gloves for anything else, but if I do I prefer goatskin.
 
husqvarna257

husqvarna257

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I use pig skin gloves because they outlast leather. My big concern is spider bites, My hands swell up good and sometimes it's the arm as well. I bought 2 Husqvarna pig skin gloves off eBay and Husqvarna shipped twice by accident so now I have 4 pair. I tried to call them and return 2 pair but I don't deal with being on hold for long. Not to mention I got a new 562 a month before that.
 
johnsayen

johnsayen

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I use the Oregon gloves and they do wear out faster than I’d originally expected. At $25 a pair that stinks, but I figure the PPE is worth it as they are comfortable to wear, which means I actually wear them.
 
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