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Ballast For Tractor Tires Advice

avason

avason

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Good Morning and Happy New Year!
I bought two new rear tire for my Kubota B1550 and am Looking for some direction on adding ballasts to my tractor tires. The size of the tires are 29 X 12.5 x 15. I have researched an am looking for a pretty inexpensive way to do it. I was going to buy a pump at Harbor Freight but my brother is going to let me borrow one of those pumps that you attache to a drill. He had good luck emptying an oil tank with it. I think the most inexpensive way that I researched was windshield washer fluid. I can pick some up for about $2.00 a gallon rated at below 20 below zero. Any advice or things that I should be looking for. I have watched some videos and it seems pretty basic. Thanks for the help guys!
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sirbuildalot

sirbuildalot

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WW fluid will definitely be the cheapest option, and you’ll get around 13-14 gallons in each tire at 75-80 percent full which is the max recommended. However, at 7-8 lbs per gallon, they won’t be enough weight to offset the loader. To get good stability, traction, safety, and counterbalancing you’ll need a three point weight in addition to the liquid ballast. A weight box is compact and fairly “inexpensive.” Could use an implement, but it will stick out further, and be more cumbersome. Even with a heavy liquid like Rimguard/Beet juice, which is about 11 lbs per gallon I’d still recommend the weight box as additional ballast. A small tractor like yours would require around 400-500 lbs on the three point to be truly effective IMO. Getting the fluid in the tires is easy BTW. Let the air out of the tire, remove the valve stem core, and get a water to air adapter (less than $10 at TSC) to pump the fluid into the tire through the valve stem. Once it’s 3/4 full, put the core back in and pump up the tire.
 
avason

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Thanks for the input...much appreciated. I don’t have a weight but I do have a box blade that i keep hooked up 50 percent of the time. Already bought the adapter, heading to home depot now to get the washer fluid. Thanks again!
 
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Franny K

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Put the liquid in a tube? Tubeless?

I thought 90% full was more the norm. You can see how full via condensation as temp and humidity changes. Put valve stem up.

How much weight are those front tires rated for.

Keep in mind a real loader has the pivoting axle opposite of the bucket.
 
avason

avason

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The rears are tubeless and I don’t know about the rating of front tires. I’ve had beet juice in my old rear tires and it had made a huge difference. My old tires were worn out and were dry cracking leaking beet juice- that is why I bought new ones.
Without any weight in the rear, the tractor is very front heavy and pretty tipsy.
 
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avason

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I think that calcium stuff corroded the rims. I’m using the windshield washer fluid because I hear it doesn’t corrode.
 

sb47

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I run just plane water anti freeze mix. The same as you run in your radiator. I used a fitting that fits a water hose and screws on the valve stem. You will have to remove the valve from the stem. Most water out of the spicket is 40 psi. Then top it off with an air hose to reach the tire presser you want. First drain the water hose and fill it with anti freeze so it will push it in the tire. I recommend anti freeze over washer fluid because it's cheaper and has a anti rust inhibitor in it. You don't want the rims to rust.
 
cookies

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winter washer fluid contains methanol, it will degrade rubber and cause it to swell/crack etc and can eat/degrade paint causing steel to rust. The farmers down here run water in tubes up to the rim level in case of rupture keeping it off the rim and add a implement if more weight is needed...if thats still not enough a larger tractor is used.
 
Marco

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Used antifreeze works, just beware of the toxic mess if it springs a leak. And most tire shops will not deal with it if you need a repair.
 
eric_271

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We use beat juice or byproduct of it at the kubota dealership I work at. It’s expensive but doesn’t harm the rubber.
I’d prefer hanging weight on the 3 point by way of implement or something like that but understand one size doesn’t fit all.There are 3 point weight attachments available and lots more compact than an implement for added weight and You can also have your tires pumped with foam. No more flats and it adds lots of weight. It’s pricey also. Last but not least wheel weights.
 
nwmo_aggie

nwmo_aggie

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Good Morning and Happy New Year!
I bought two new rear tire for my Kubota B1550 and am Looking for some direction on adding ballasts to my tractor tires. The size of the tires are 29 X 12.5 x 15. I have researched an am looking for a pretty inexpensive way to do it. I was going to buy a pump at Harbor Freight but my brother is going to let me borrow one of those pumps that you attache to a drill. He had good luck emptying an oil tank with it. I think the most inexpensive way that I researched was windshield washer fluid. I can pick some up for about $2.00 a gallon rated at below 20 below zero. Any advice or things that I should be looking for. I have watched some videos and it seems pretty basic. Thanks for the help guys!
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You’ll need some like this to let air out as you pump water in to do the job well.



washer fluid can work, but isn’t as heavy as Beet juice or CaCL. Only benefit is it’s available and doesn’t rust. You’ll be able to get some weight in there, but you’re looking at somewhere in the 10-12 gallon per tire max, so under 100# tops?
 
avason

avason

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So I actually started the process the day I started This thread. It didn’t work out the way I expected. I borrowed one of those drill pumps from my brother. I thought it was broken because it wasn’t moving any of the liquid. It actually wasn’t broken, I was just impatient going from a garden hose size inlet to the valve stem size inlet. Going from the sizes takes quite a while. I quit and ordered one of those transfer pumps from Amazon for about 50 bucks. It is sitting on my bench now and I’m going to give it a try this weekend. I’m hoping the transfer pump works a little quicker.
On top of that, it was looking like my valve stem was leaking so I just quit altogether. The valve stem was not leaking.
The windshield washer fluid is sitting in my garage and like I said I’ll give it a try this weekend. I will let you guys know how I make out. Thanks for all the feedback!
 
eric_271

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I'm surprised nobody mentioned to block up the axle before letting out the air..hmmm
It’s a good idea to stop before all the air is out also, at least on new tires and rims. I always put the core back in but loose. I’ve had too many beads come loose letting all the air out. By the time I’m done pumping the fluid, more often than not I let a few pounds of air out to end up at 20psi
 
ElevatorGuy

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I filled my jd 1025r tires with the -20° ww fluid. You don’t need tubes but I did swap my valve stems to brass ones. That wasn’t needed either but it was recommended for rim guard. I did it for cheap insurance. I added about 11.5 gallons to each tire, it made a huge difference but I also have 600 pounds in the ballast box. After I got my forks and lifted a rear tire is when I filled them.
 
avason

avason

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Ended up filling the tires with the current valve stems. No leaking yet. Hindsight I should have put new valve stems on when I put the new tires on. I put about 12 gallons in them and it seems like the tires could have used more. The say fill to 85-90 %. I am probably there. Thanks guys! Enjoy the rest of the weekend.
 
sirbuildalot

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Ended up filling the tires with the current valve stems. No leaking yet. Hindsight I should have put new valve stems on when I put the new tires on. I put about 12 gallons in them and it seems like the tires could have used more. The say fill to 85-90 %. I am probably there. Thanks guys! Enjoy the rest of the weekend.
If you ever end up doing it again, I'd recommend using a 5 gallon bucket and a submersible pump. You attach the air-water adapter on the end of the hose and screw it onto your valve stem. The other end of the short (5-8' long) hose screws onto the pump. The pump goes in the bucket with as much WW fluid as you can fit in the bucket, leaving a few inches so it stays contained. It only takes a few minutes to pump in 10-12 gallons. You do have to let it "burp" out the air every 2-3 gallons though. Just unplug the pump and let it get rid of the air by bubbling in the bucket. I've done maybe 5 or 6 sets of tires this way. Ranging form 23x8.5x12 up to 29 x12.5x15
 
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