• ArboristSite has decided that due to the abusive interactions users are having with each other in the political forum, we will no longer be providing a place to talk politics on this forum. Any political posts will be deleted once discovered or reported to us. We are sorry for this inconvenience.

ArboristSite.com Sponsors
www.harvesterbars.com


Bars with built in tensioner.

Fish

Account Hold
Joined
Apr 22, 2001
Messages
13,967
Age
58
Location
Loretto/Manton Ky.
Website
stores.ebay.com
They come stock on some Poulans, they are called intenz, after a while, the
user usually tightens the bar nuts so tight, in a futile effort to keep his chain
tight, that he {or she} pulls the bar studs through the plastic crankcase and
ruining the saw.
When they first came out, a thread was started discussing them, on
another forum, and a guy claiming to be the engineer that designed them
was defending his idea. He also offered to send Che one for free to try, but
I do not know if that ever happened.

She only lives 30 miles away, but we have never met. I think she is afraid of me. Lambert went to her farm a couple of years ago, ask him about it.
 
chainsawworld

chainsawworld

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Jan 2, 2002
Messages
895
Location
upstate ny
Website
www.expage.com
stay away from them babies. if you get the chance to buy a saw with one of them make sure the saw has a place for a regular bar tension bolt and lug. that way you can lose the bar and headaches. marty
 
Last edited:
oldwild

oldwild

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Messages
208
Age
51
Location
Nebraska
once I have the tension set on the 220, I just make sure the bar nuts are good and tight, haven't really had much problem with mine. There is a regular tensionor built into the saw also, but the screw is not very large, plus it is on the outside of the saw. Takes a bit of abuse!
 
Toneman

Toneman

Makin Chips
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Messages
823
Age
58
Location
Ontario
My brother's Echo 3000 came with the Intez system and he hated it. I ended up converting it to the conventional screw type adjuster.
I figure Oregon had a good sales and marketing team that "sold" this idea as a good one to their management
 
Lawn Masters

Lawn Masters

Banned
Joined
Mar 9, 2004
Messages
4,019
Age
32
Location
Florida
Website
Visit site
I bought one once thinking that it would work well, but I learned the hard way it doesnt work. I had the CS3000 too. nice saw when I put the screw type tensioner in it.
 
Mange

Mange

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 27, 2004
Messages
2,472
Age
47
Location
East Sk?ne Sweden
Website
Visit site
I was talking to a dealer nearby and he told me about thease bars.
The reason I ask is that there is a market chain here that sells hobby Mac's and Partners, They all come with thease bars and no tensioner. The store sent the first 20 saws to this dealer for repairs, and he simply adjusted the chain like the manual said. He then called the store and informed them.
and after that not many problems.

So in all this is not a user freindly thing?
I would think it to be same work, if it is in the bar or not.
 
Mange

Mange

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 27, 2004
Messages
2,472
Age
47
Location
East Sk?ne Sweden
Website
Visit site
Fish said:
They come stock on some Poulans, they are called intenz, after a while, the
user usually tightens the bar nuts so tight, in a futile effort to keep his chain
tight, that he {or she} pulls the bar studs through the plastic crankcase and
ruining the saw.
When they first came out, a thread was started discussing them, on
another forum, and a guy claiming to be the engineer that designed them
was defending his idea. He also offered to send Che one for free to try, but
I do not know if that ever happened.

She only lives 30 miles away, but we have never met. I think she is afraid of me. Lambert went to her farm a couple of years ago, ask him about it.
I am afraid to ask ;)
 
Oregon Engineer

Oregon Engineer

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
198
Location
Oregon
Intenz, internal tensioning bars

Yes Fish, I did send Che the bars she requested.

No Netree, it was not a slow day when I designed the Intenz bars. They overcame the number one customer problem for infrequent chain saw users and the major reason for returned products.

BPTREE, the Husky 335 is a professional arborist saw and some arborists have experienced bar slippage due to professional saw techniques used when only holding the saw with one hand. This type of professional usage is a gray zone for the Intenz bar. Works for some but not for others.

TONEMAN, The Echo saws with a shoulder on the saw studs did present some problems with the Intenz bars. If the bar was not fully against the saw pad, the bar rack engaged the smaller diameter threaded part of the stud. When the saw stud nuts were tightened up, the bar rack was deformed against the shoulder and would not function properly. After seeing this problem we worked with Echo to change the stud design.


Tjena Mange,

I'm the engineer that people have been commenting on. I designed the Intenz bars and would be happy to profile their intended use, and areas where they will not work satisfactorily.

A major chain saw manufacturer came to OREGON with a major customer problem, their users could not properly tension the chain on a chain saw. They challenged OREGON to overcome the problem.

To those on this web site it might sound ridiculous not being able to tension a chain saw properly. You guys probably learn it right after you learned to tie your shoes in kindergarten. But for the infrequent user, chain tension is a major issue. They usually start by running it too loose and the chain gets beat up and throws. Then they crank the chain down until the bar bows, the chain turns blue, and the nose bearings turn into dots. The infrequent user does not have the mechanical background and will not read instructions. It’s so bad that many chain saws sold to infrequent users come with the bar and chain assembled. Why pre-assemble the bar and chain thus incurring the extra labor cost and larger packaging? The infrequent user has a 50-50 chance of getting the chain on facing the correct direction, no joke. These are the people Intenz bars were designed for, they need something easy, fool proof (I’m not insulting my customers, just using a common phrase), and fast (or they will not tension as often as they should).

The rack and pinion system in the Intenz bars is designed to deliver the proper chain tension on bars from 10” to 20” long when a scrench (a tool usually included with the chain saw) is used to turn the pinion on the side of the bar. The rack forks contact the forward saw stud and spread out. The angle of the rack forks is critical in preventing the infrequent user from over tensioning the chain. The forks spread out and lock up against the inner bar core and saw stud when proper tension is applied to the chain. I’ve attached a features and benefits sheet that shows the internal parts of the bar. The bars are intended to be used with chain that is rated as blue label for kickback. This is chain for the infrequent user so it is not aggressive.

Occasionally we still run into someone complaining the bar slips, but after a conversation we convince them they need to tighten the saw stud nuts as normal, instead of leaving them so loose they fall off. Try and keep a straight face when you explain that to a customer.

Intenz was not designed for heavy professional use, bars longer than 20”, or aggressive chains. The more aggressive chains and resulting professional saw handling techniques may cause slow bar movement. Most professionals require a finer chain adjustment and often use long bars.

Consumer Reports magazine from May of 2001 rated saws with Intenz bars and advised its readers to look for the added features of side saw tensioning. Side saw tensioning is more convenient, faster, and eliminates contact with the hot muffler and bucking spikes.

One last note: Many millions of these bars have been sold with a substantial decrease in returns because the infrequent chain saw users get the proper tension and don’t burn up the bar noses.

If you have any questions about using Intenz bars on specific saw models please email me.

Regards,
Oregon Engineer
 
Mange

Mange

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 27, 2004
Messages
2,472
Age
47
Location
East Sk?ne Sweden
Website
Visit site
Very informative.
Thanks for responding to this thread.

Is this something that can be ordered for different mounts and bars?
I was thinking on the possibility to use these bars where there is no parts available, or just to test under more pro conditions.

I got a question from an other collector about automatic tensioner, has this been tested?

Mange
 
oldwild

oldwild

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Messages
208
Age
51
Location
Nebraska
I would not recomend this bar for pro conditions. It has performed OK for my lighter cutting, before I started cutting bigger and heavier loads on the chains. I really don't think after using it that it would work beyond a 16" limbing saw, let alone a felling saw!
 

che

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Jan 29, 2002
Messages
601
Age
66
Location
KY
Fish...you do scare me....actually I have this deep seated fear of llamas and didn't feel ready to confront it yet. Send me an email....I'll buy you a hamburger somewhere, so long as it's Angus. ;-)

Yes Fish, I did send Che the bars she requested.
Well, not quite. We discussed it, I sent you my 'numbers'...which you then told me didn't match up with my saw. It was probably starting calving season which runs into daylily season....and it was my fault, I dropped the ball.

If I remember correctly (which is always a question these days)....after exchanging emails with you, I didn't think that the intenz bar was anything I felt I really needed.

I think I was initially under the impression that it was some kind of bar that automatically kept the proper chain tension, or was able to be tightened without loosening the bar nuts. I didn't really see the advantage if that wasn't the case.

I do apologize for not getting back to you though. You were very prompt with your replies and explanations, and obviously ready to follow through on your kind offer.

Che
 
NeTree

NeTree

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Sep 30, 2002
Messages
6,095
Location
Barre, MA
Website
www.netree.org
All of which tells me that if you're not smart enough to figure out how to keep a chain tensioned properly in short order, you shouldn't be using such a dangerous tool in the first place.

See "Darwinian Selection".

;)
No offense, OE.
 
Top