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Battery operated saws

Nathan Graff

Nathan Graff

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Not a big WS fan, but I will try to get around to watching it.

What are the metrics used to choose a saw? Just power? Cost? Run time? Weight? Etc.

What are the convenience advantages of one versus another?

Is a DeWalt battery saw a fair competition to a STIHL MS260 because they have the same length bar? Or is it more in the class of a 30-40cc saw?

Philbert
I can't remember what the metric was, but I think he used a 6AH battery in the dewalt vs one tank of fuel in the MS260. What was cut was what the dewalt cut with one charge vs one fuel fill on the 260. He got about 3 times the amount of sawing that the battery saw did with the gas saw.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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The key to battery powered outdoor power equipment is buying into a platform or family of tools. I have used my saws and polesaws for convenience tasks as well as responding to tornado clean up.

The same batteries power lawn mowers, hedge trimmers, string trimmers, leaf blowers, snow throwers, ice augers, tillers, rotary brooms, . . . depending on which platform you buy into.

I was skeptical at first - used a lot of corded O*P*E, and have been impressed. Quality is always an issue, but the batteries from my first Oregon chainsaw still work. (8 years ago!!!
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/review-oregon-powernow-cordless-chainsaw.179262/)

Yes they have a life. But consider the costs of fuel (and tune ups, air and fuel filters, spark plugs, etc.) over the life span of the batteries too.

Not saying that these tools are for every person and every application, but they are growing in popularity every day.

Just saw an ad for a battery powered rescue (circular saw) specifically designed for the fire service: not exactly a 'prosumer' application.

Philbert
 
Capitalist

Capitalist

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Similar tool (hold on to your man card):



Philbert
I worked ductile on commerial waterline for years.
We used stihl cutoff saws gas powered because we didnt have time to mess around with dinky saws.
The most important aspect was 16" of bigger blade diameter to make a clean square fast cut.

We would have thrown this in a hole and called the owner bitchin.

However...
Milwaukee m18 lithium brushless 1/2" impacts with 5.0 batts are indestructible and irreplaceable for the 1-1/4" bolts.

Dewalt has been monkey stomped by milwaukee in the lit ion batt section.

They were literally ran under sandy water daily and put away wet and lasted two years cinching 6 gallon buckets of bolts daily.

If you are indoors you will stillbe money ahead to radio an outside guy to cut pipe and carry it in.
 
andy at clover

andy at clover

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Similar tool (hold on to your man card):



Philbert
Kinda long winded...
I've been using Milwaukee M18 at work for a few years now and keep adding tools with pretty high satisfaction. (residential GC)
This year we added the 10" compound miter at work saw and pole saw at home.
They have a couple high capacity batteries (9ah and 12ah) that really make some of these bigger tools compete with corded (they are often heavier than corded).

Milwaukee offers a 5 year warranty that is determined by the Serial number.
I blew out one of my sds+ roto-hammers that I got in trade.
Went on to their website and filled out their "E-Service" form.
Printed a pre-paid fedex label and 2 weeks later had a repaired tool at my door... Sweet!

The Pole-saw with 10" bar (3/8lp) is a great in use. "Starts" when you hit the throttle. Has plenty of chewing power even with a 3-5ah battery.
Put in a 9ah or 12ah battery and it goes all day.

I don't own one yet but,... the 16" chainsaw I borrowed from one of my carpenters for a weekend.
It's a heavy saw for the bar length but man does it cut!
I used the 12ah battery that it came with. Fell, limbed, and bucked a trio of 10" alders and it had 2 out of 4 test diodes still lighting up.... pretty impressive.
Cutting with cordless takes some getting used to. The sound of a chain going through wood is kind of an awful thing that usually a 2stroke motor obscures.
Anyway... their is my Milluakee 2c .

Goodluck!
With a 2 proper batteries ... you won't miss a gas saw for your purpose.
 
cpttimerestraint

cpttimerestraint

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For me, I went battery powered because I don't use my saw everyday. I like not having to worry about gummed up carbs. I know that they aren't for everyone, but they work for my application. I can do about 5 hours of prunning on one 80v battery. I have a pole saw and a chainsaw. Both 80v.
 
Remle

Remle

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I can't remember what the metric was, but I think he used a 6AH battery in the dewalt vs one tank of fuel in the MS260. What was cut was what the dewalt cut with one charge vs one fuel fill on the 260. He got about 3 times the amount of sawing that the battery saw did with the gas saw.
It’s still comparing apples and parsnips. He could have done the test inside his garage and then determined that the MS260 was a monoxide hazard.

Bottom line is that battery saws are less powerful, but very quiet and convenient. If you’re just cutting down a Christmas tree or getting rid of a few downed limbs after a storm they’re awesome. If you’re splitting wood and need a saw for that occasional log that wants to shred or gives you trouble they’re great too. It’s super convenient to be able to pickup your saw, cut for 10 seconds and then put it down again without having to start a gas engine. If you’re spending hours felling and bucking trees or you have really big wood to cut, then they’re not a good choice.
 
Nathan Graff

Nathan Graff

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It’s still comparing apples and parsnips. He could have done the test inside his garage and then determined that the MS260 was a monoxide hazard.

Bottom line is that battery saws are less powerful, but very quiet and convenient. If you’re just cutting down a Christmas tree or getting rid of a few downed limbs after a storm they’re awesome. If you’re splitting wood and need a saw for that occasional log that wants to shred or gives you trouble they’re great too. It’s super convenient to be able to pickup your saw, cut for 10 seconds and then put it down again without having to start a gas engine. If you’re spending hours felling and bucking trees or you have really big wood to cut, then they’re not a good choice.
I do think that they have their place. Was asking milwaukee to build a tophandle that I could use while stuffing the wood chipper and trim one or a dozen tree branches. I don't think they're for cutting firewood though.
 
cpttimerestraint

cpttimerestraint

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Which brand / models? Any other pros and cons you can share for folks who might be looking to make a similar purchase?

Thanks.

Philbert
I have the greenworks/ kobalt 80v saws. I love that all I have to do is push the on button and pull the trigger. It is great for when you are starting and stopping a lot. I use it to trim my mature pepper and oak trees. Most cuts are under 12 inches. Plenty of power and battery life.

My only complaint is the weight. With the 80v battery, they are very heavy. I may buy a small saw from another brand for the small prunning.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 
Remle

Remle

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It all depends on how much firewood you’re cutting, but for more than 1/4 cord, yeah, gas is the way to go.

They’re like a lot of smaller tools. They don’t quite measure up as a one size fits all solution, but once you’ve got both you find they get a LOT of use. My 12v hackzall literally gets used 90% of the time when I need a recip saw.
 
memory

memory

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I little update on the saw. I bought this saw, https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-...5-0Ah-Battery-and-Charger-DCCS620P1/301844173

Have not used it all that much yet, probably made about 10 cuts or so, not used up a full battery charge yet. Going to try and see how many cuts it can make with a 5ah battery. So far, I am happy with it. It does cut a little slower than I am used to, but that is expected. Oils really good.

For what I am doing with it, it does the job just fine. Now will I try to cut a 20" tree with this saw? No, but this will do just fine cutting limbs and small trees. Is this saw going to replace my gas saws? No and don't see that happening for a while but I can see that changing in the future as battery technology should keep improving.
 
Cloggerpro

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Guys, as regards battery saws and how well chainsaw protection works against them, check out this video I put together - . While I obviously can't speak for other brands of chainsaw protection I can confidently say that Clogger chainsaw protection (who I work for) works just as well with battery saws as it does with 2 stroke. In the tests I did the MS220C didn't even get 1/3 of the way through the protection.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Guys, as regards battery saws and how well chainsaw protection works against them, check out this video I put together -
Thanks. There is a lot of confusion and misinformation on chaps and corded electric or battery powered chainsaws. Of course it is important to remember that chaps may not protect against all saws in every situation. But your comments are consistent with what STIHL posts on their website:

"WARNING FOR CORDED ELECTRIC AND BATTERY CHAINSAW USERS! The fibers may not stop the sprocket on most corded electric chainsaws and some battery-powered chainsaws because of the constant high torque. However, to reduce the severity of injury from accidental contact with the chain, STIHL recommends that leg protection be worn when operating these types of chainsaws. "

Philbert
 
SteveSr

SteveSr

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Finally found the original video although it won't seem to let me upload it for some reason! Give me a shout if you want a copy or have any questions.
Can you post the video to YouTube or similar and then just post a link to it on the forum? That is how most videos are shared here.
 
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