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Bottom End 2150/2145 Jonsereds and Husky 350 etc.

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by WadePatton, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    *after a dealer overhaul from a stolen/abused/recovery situation, which led to the 2150 purchase.

    Lately I had stud issues with my 2150, and got that temporarily fixed (it unfixed itself), and the MOMENT it started sucking air (apparently) and I couldn't get it to tune properly--I yanked it apart. I have learned to pay attention to everything, and overspeed/irregular idle are not to be ignored eh?

    And all my German saws are down right now-aren't sparking apparently. And it's the middle of my firewooding season.

    So I've purchased or have on order: jug/slug/adapter 45mm closed port, bearings/seals, bar studs 2150, boot and clamp-trying to get a saw going. Going to get a new pressure/vac gauge if I can't find my old one (workshop is in transition, shut down presently).

    2145 is the current (was until this morning) project. I've never been this deep in a 2-stroke, only automotive/diesel stuff. When I got the top off I noted that the crank was not easy to turn. When I got the crank out the bearings felt fine, but the case isn't so great and that one bearing is losing it's cage and the cage metal has been floating around in there.

    I do remember a muffler coming loose once and snugging it back and going on with it.

    About my other wood-fetchers: Thing is I got "into" bigger saws with my pawn-shop 7900 and the "parts box" 116s (Sachs Dolmar) and used them a lot in the last 10 years. Then the 7900 lost its fire a couple years back and the 116 did apparently the same, just a few weeks ago. Right after I pulled it back out because the 024 lost it's spark. I had falled back to the 024 for a couple or three years of late. It was old and reliable. The 2100 is just a bit heavy for firewooding and I've not started it in a handful of years--thought I was going to mill with it. Did cut and buck a few logs with the beast. But getting into the bigger saws took most of my attention away from the 50cc-class. Just hadn't had saw-fixing money for a while and now a have a little bit.

    So I'm thinking a good cleanup and epoxy patch might work to save this case, but I'd like the learned and experienced to glance at it. I wouldn't expect a proshop to build on this case, but as the owner/op, I think I may as well give it a shot. I'm afraid I've missed the market on second-hand 350's/2150's and parts. BUT I'M KEEPING AN EYE OUT!

    These were great saws for me, as I'd only ever run the 024 since a teen, and bought these just for firewooding back in 2002/3 or so. But there was on "popularity" to them. Funny how I come back years later and find out there's a big bunch of 350 fans. I always have been--but had no one to share it with much. But that 116s and 7900 showed me what torque and CC's could do and I loved them too.

    Anyway. I'm "starting over" with my Jonnies and rooting around in here for some fresh JBweld. Good mornin'.



    20190106_115731.jpg
     
  2. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    So, after all that introduction and yadda yadda--

    Anybuddy 'round here rebuild one in this shape? Just to be clear- the bearing seat is my concern, not the exhaust gas damage. I think I can skim-coat that with epoxy and get it all to glue up. Maybe this is not a big deal? I expect someone in this group has seen similar, but I realize pro-shops probably would call this case junk. Thanks.
     
  3. nwhunter

    nwhunter ArboristSite Lurker

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    Me, I would buy a new 350 crankcase, on ebay they are less than $50 with shipping.
    I wouldn't waste time on that melted case.
    But you do need to figure out what caused that.
    Good luck!
    Keith
     
  4. huskihl

    huskihl Addicted to ArboristSite

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    These saws are notorious for the muffler bolts loosening up. It then blows the gasket out and the hot exhaust melts the case. I think if a guy was to check the bolts often enough this might not happen.
     
  5. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    The muffler damage is not an issue.

    this is not what the thread is about, one simple re-torque takes care of it in my experience with two saws of this design.

    Thanks for you comments just the same. I changed the pic so folks might see the main issue.
     
  6. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Throws fitty here, throws fitty there, getting low on fitties...

    I'm thinking straight gas got into it. Like I refilled my can, needed oil, went to the store, got distracted-as I am wont to do--prolly bought diesel and soda and snuff and was rushing in front of rain storm/temp drop (who knows--but tha's how I used to do it--and I still rush in the face of a storm). Went to the woods started cutting and apparently had enough color in the gas to not notice it. It's been many years since, so I'm not concerned with that at this point--all new parts and a pressure test will show if I have any other issues I do expect.

    Yes I've just shopped for cases and found a few. SUCKS waiting on another part while the woodpile shrinks. I'll slap the 2150 back together and get to testing it (developed air leak after bar-stud episode--and still has bar stud fixing to address (another thread-new/improved design may be the ticket).
     
  7. nwhunter

    nwhunter ArboristSite Lurker

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    Wade, if you have the time and patience good epoxy probably would work for a long time.
    I come from a production lumber mill background, retired after over 40 years in industry.
    We replaced one feed bearing housing that had eaten itself up with belzona, a fancy two part epoxy.
    The repair was still working 20 years later when it was replaced with another newer, better, planer.
    At the time there was business buying junk diesel truck engines with bad bearing housings, rebuilding them with belzona and selling the motors rebuilt and warrantied, with no failures I was aware of.
     
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  8. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Thanks. That's what I'm thinking seriously of doing. Hell if it don't work-I can still buy a case and re-use most parts again again.
     
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  9. huskihl

    huskihl Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yep. I was just commenting about the heat damage to the cases so maybe others could save themselves from the same problem.

    As far as the bearing pocket, it looks like the bearing seized up or at least there was some excessive heat there. I'd say it's worth a try to coat that area with sealant when you put the crank in and give it a shot. It's not too big of a job to get a new case if it doesn't work.
     
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  10. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Righto.

    The bearing feels fine when I put a .020 shim in the damaged side, crank rotates normally. Without the shim it's in a bind.

    So the plan is to clean it up some more and do a few dry fit-ups to get my shim thickness correct, then work it out for a proper build up using a metal shim epoxied to the case. Dry fit that to check out alignment, then glue it up proper (DirkoYama1184BondSealHT blended of course ;)) and proceed in a normal manner.
     
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  11. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    So the tools came and I got the clutch off my 2150 today. Yes I broke it pecking on it with a rope in the hole--which usually works for me. I dropped them coins and got a nicely made piston stop and tool for the little clutches (I modified a socket for the three piece clutches long time ago). The gizmos worked great.

    THEN I found my air leak on the 2150--or what I suspect most highly--one of the adapter plate to case screws was MIA. Judging by the crud in the hole, it has been missing for years. That is sad-but it -is- a 17 year old saw. Date on the 2150 is '02, and '01 on the 2145. 50 has the coarse thread in the bottom and the 45 has the fine.

    In the process of pulling it apart the second bar stud fell off in the oil tank and the backing plate did too. So the next move is to get all that stuff out and get all the oil cleaned up. My replacements just got mailed, so I may try to fix these in the meanwhile. Boot is tight on this one, slipped right off the 45. I'm going to try to get it running again soon with or without bar studs. I have deleted the base gasket and checked squish, but am way too green (and saw needy) to mess with ports at this point. I figure the compression bump will be nice on this one and the CC increase will be good for the 45.

    I port-matched and smoothed my 12v diesel head a long time ago---and a lot more (but that's quite another story), so it's only natural to want to tweak on these saws too. I get 2 or three going, then I'll be ready to tweak on 'em if the time presents itself. Just pulling these down fully has taught me a lot.



    I'm nuts without a running saw... pardon my rambles. Also I have noted that it's common for screws to be slightly long and will watch for, and adjust as necessary.
     
  12. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Sorry about the size, there's no resizer in my digital device and I forget to stand much farther away/crop to make them fit this forum. I've got the pic size tuned to moderate already.

    BUT NOW I can see just exactly what happened. I had no idea there was a square head missing off my bar stud--that piece stuck in oil somewhere. I twisted the head off the stud--and then stuck it back there!!!

    So the studs I have in the mail appear to have splines as well. And I don't think fishing this stuff through the filler hole is going to work. Oh boy. Get my case splitter shoes on eh?

    20190107_140953.jpg
     
  13. rupedoggy

    rupedoggy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well now just how ARE you going to do it????????
     
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  14. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    :nofunny:

    Until I figgered out that's the only way unless I reeeelly want to expand and improve my plastic welding techniques.

    And then on next glance I could see that it wasn't a terrible problem. I've "re-mounted" the headless stud once already and remember exactly how that went. This will be similar but with more parts.
     
  15. huskihl

    huskihl Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Stick the bolts onto an extendable magnet and go through the oil fill
     
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  16. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Yes I've done a stud -remount- before.

    I never said that wasn't doable. But I didn't have a magnet. I have other tricks. The point is that that stud is broken clean OFF. And I didn't realize that--had no reason to guess that when I first attempted the repair.

    Bar studs used to be a little tiny bit more dependable.
     
  17. JohnT34

    JohnT34 ArboristSite Lurker

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    I have replaced the studs on a 345 plastic case before as follows
    Step 1 insert the metal tray using a Long nose long reach pliers and line it up
    Step 2 insert outer bolt using same pliers and turn head until it lines up correctly with metal tray and tap into place with a punch
    Step 3 this was a head scratcher for me as to how to get the rear bolt through the hole as the angle is terrible. In the end I used some of the the heat shrinkable electrical wire covering which I shrank on to the threads of the bolt and then pulled that through the case hole which basically oriented the bolt correctly, pulling the bolt through the hole. Then I tightened the nut with the clutch cover on to fully seat the bolt


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  18. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Yeah, I'm done with studs. No more studs to mess with. That part is done. It's over with. Yeah yeah, it don't count without pics--but really I did it, no magnet, no pliers, at all. sure did.

    But the rest ain't over yet: As one of the adapter to case screws was missing when I broke it down, and I didn't note the odd threading right off and so failed to make a timely order for a replacement, I hit a local mower shop today (no saw shops close) and he's got no screw. SO I'll fix that hole to the screw I do have.

    Yes I can buy one, but I'm not in the mood to wait--and I can do that later if this doesn't work out.
     
  19. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Oh well maybe I should essplain:

    Dental floss, tie in threads, poke it through tank with a bamboo skewer (split to catch the thread), then fiddle it around with a stick for position (bodock split whittled smooth here). repeat for second one.
     
  20. WadePatton

    WadePatton ArboristSite Guru

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    Got a junk saw given to me yesterday at mower shop down in the big city. Got it home, ripped it down, damn wrong screws. So I ordered the right screws.

    Now I'm onto the plastic surgery. All my parts and goo came in. I get this case patched up and I'll begin reassembly and testing.
     

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