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Brush cutting with a weed whacker

Discussion in 'Farming and Gardening Forum' started by Mycrossover, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. Mycrossover

    Mycrossover ArboristSite Member

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    I must live in a bubble but I just noticed that there are saw blades you can put on a weed whacker and cut pretty big stuff, that I would have cut with with pruning shears or my chain saw. I have an old but super reliable RedMax weed whacker fom when Komatsu owned Red Max. Any blade suggestions? Does this put undue strain on the weed whacker? Exceedingly dangerous? Thanks for any advice.

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  2. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    For tough wood brush or saplings I like the redmax sst229 blade. It is basically chainsaw teeth stamped into a metal blade. You sharpen them the same way.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/273411646760


    For heavy grass and weeds I like the stihl 3 blade brush knife.

    https://www.stihlusa.com/products/trimmers-and-brushcutters/trimmer-heads-and-blades/brushknife/


    Added strain? Yup. Dangerous? Hell yah. Bike handles and a harness are recommended. I have done a lot of clearing in my younger days and any sort of power brush cutter will save you hours of labor. Depending on how much land you want to clear consider renting a walk behind brushcutter (billygoat) or hiring someone with a tractor and a 3-point brush hog.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SxQJWoD4FY
     
    Big Red Oaks 4 me and tilenick like this.
  3. Mycrossover

    Mycrossover ArboristSite Member

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    Thanks. My string trimmer is not a model with the bicycle handles and it came with the simple shoulder strap. I imagine it can get away from you pretty quick with a saw blade. I see there are other blades with a lot if teeth, like 80. How does that behave compared to a chain saw tooth design? I have a lot of "strangler vines" with thorns in the brush. That stuff is NASTY.

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  4. Big Red Oaks 4 me

    Big Red Oaks 4 me Fun with flying wood chips

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    I don't seem to have a problem keeping the chainsaw out of dirt, but I'm not quite as "precision" with my brush-cutting Echo blade. :surprised3:
     
  5. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Stihl used to make a D handle with an additional small bar set at 90 degrees to give the D handle user a sporting chance with a blade. Blade performance will really depend on the displacement of your trimmer. I have seen big honkin’ clearing saws with blades that look like a lawn mower. We use 40cc stihl fs250s. Plenty of power for clearing but still can run a string head. You can always go granola and rent a herd of goats. Even power line companies are using them around here.
     
  6. Franny K

    Franny K xyz

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    Do you have the pieces that grip the blade? Are those parts available for that model? A curved shaft one would not be applicable. Sure it will put massively more stresses when you bind the blade from full rpm. Official brushcutters have the bike handle setup and there is an anvil of sorts to purchase separately depending on what you are doing. Manuals for those things are easily downloadable. I kind of like the steel blades (sheet/plate) that you sharpen with a chainsaw file I think a big (12") one has 24 teeth you would want a small one perhaps 8" I would think. Pole saws/pole pruners are a better choice for vines in my opinion. Not a monster extendable one.
     
  7. blades

    blades Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Straight shaft is preferred. You would want the steel plate blades with very small teeth, chains / tri arc, or any thing with a low tooth count will be unmanageable. Iirm correctly you need to cut from right to left not swinging back and forth, this throws most of the chips away from you based on a right hand rotation.
     

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