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Canary Island Pine

myroyce

myroyce

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Jan 24, 2003
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Ventura, CA
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I have several Canary Island Pine trees located on my hillside property in Ventura, CA.
They were planted by the developer of my tract around 1980. My house
was built in 1982, and I purchased it in 1996.

My across the street neighbor, who is a 'difficult' person, has a
problem with my trees blocking his view of the coast line here in
Ventura. He built his house in 1988-1989 -- long before I got here;
however the trees had been here almost 10 years at that point.

FYI, there is no city ordinance with regard to trees blocking the view
of the ocean, and there is no deed restriction on my property regarding
views.

My questions to you regarding these trees are:

1. My neighbor would like me to "top" my trees so that he can have a
view of the ocean. I have been told that there is a beetle or some
'beastie' that would attack the tree and kill it.
A) If the tree is topped ( actually my neighbor wants them
almost cut half way down), is there a strong likely hood of the tree
dying?

2. My understanding that the Canary Island Pine has a rather
extensive root system and that root system is helping to stabilize my
hillside.
A) Do these trees have a extensive root system?
B) If the tree dies, does the root system rot away with the
possible result of hillside de-stabilization?

3. Is there any way to calculate at what rate the Canary Island Pine
would grow? (I live in Ventura, CA within 10 miles of the coast line).
A) How many feet / inches per year?
B) How tall might a 10 year old tree be?
C) A 20 year old? - actually how much taller would it grow in
10-13 years over a 10 year old tree?

Any help that you can give me will be appreciated.

Please e-mail me with your answers: [email protected]


Kindest personal regards,


Dr. Robert L. Pazen
Ventura CA
e-mail: [email protected]
 
Stumper

Stumper

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I'll second Sonny's advice. Topping any tree is almost invariably the wrong thing to do. I don't have first hand experience with Canary Island pines but any tree's root system has a stabilizing influence and helps prevent erosion.(In fairness though, if an unstable tree is uprooted it can create a great deal of "instant" erosion.
While being considerate of your neighbors desire for a view is admirable, your neighbor SHOULD be considerate of your property rights and the value you place on your trees. If you want to be super neighborly you might consider removing some trees while leaving others. Topping should be a definite "I'm sorry, but I will not do that.":angel:
 
NIP Group
treeclimber165

treeclimber165

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Yup, good advice so far and I agree.
Trimming is hard on pines, they usually do not compartmentalize wounds well and will leak sap for a long time. This leaves stains on anything within 30' and also leaves the tree more vulnerable to harmful pests.
Topping is an absolute NO!! regardless of conditions. If your neighbor wants your view, he can buy your property. For him to even consider asking you to destroy or butcher your trees so HE can get a better view is assinine and shows just how little class some people have.

I will not email you a private response. This is a public forum for the benefit of everyone who comes here reads the information, not a private 'Dial-an-Arborist' service.
:angel:
 
ORclimber

ORclimber

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I agree with all of the above in this case and would add that if you did choose to remove some of the trees for your neighbors benefit have him pay for it and also pay for a slow or low growing replacement tree(s) that you choose.
 
Jay Banks

Jay Banks

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I would second OR's comments. Each tree has a value and a consulting arborist can provide you with that information. I would get that in hand before offering to remove any tree so you can show that there is a value loss to your property.
 

Jock

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Canary Island Pine (Pinus canariensis) believe it or not :) seen them while on holiday in Tenerife, they have long grass like needles and have a lot of problems with tourists throwing cigarette ends out of car windows and setting fire to the carpet of dried needle's, they have beautiful forests on the mountains though, worth a look......Jock. And by the way dont top them. as all you will get in a few years is a staghorn top or a dead pine.
 
Kneejerk Bombas

Kneejerk Bombas

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As a possible compromise, how about having your neighbor pay for a consulting arborist to come appraise the tree's value, damages caused by thier removal or topping, clean up and stump removal, and replacing them with low growing plants?
Once this dollar value is determined, he could pay to have the work done as well as reimburse you for thier original value.
 
Ned Sapper

Ned Sapper

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Topping a Canary Island Pine Tree

Canary Island pine trees can be trimmed and "topped" to maintain height without too much harm due to the unique nature of the growth crowns or "candles".
Obviously if you top the tree at a large cross section between crown blooms then it is harder on the tree but this is not necessary.
By cutting just the center candle or primary branch of the top crown you will slow the growth vertically since there are 4 to 5 side branches that will share the extra growth.
This does require some maintenance in time as sometimes a single side branch will take over as primary but not often.
Also as each side branch grows longer with new crowns the centers can be taken off of those so they don't take off.
It is better to plan ahead and time this so the top crown is trimmed and not lower down on the tree but even if the cut is down lower as long as it is cut at the base of the crown and not in between crowns on the trunk it appears to not harm the tree.
I have done this also on older branches all the way up the tree to slow branch growth and help fill in the tree with great response.
 
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