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Chain grinding Newbie

Kage1339

Kage1339

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Hello everyone! First post here. I recently purchased an Oregon 520 grinder and finally got to grind my first chain today. The chain is a Stihl semi chisel .325 pitch chain. Angles were 60, 30, 0. My question is how far into the gullet should I take the wheel? In the pic below I basically took it to where it is in line with the “flat”. I know as I grind this chain more and more I probably won’t be able to go as deep because I’d hit the drive links. Any advice or recommendations are appreciated. Thanks in advance!!!
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capetrees

capetrees

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Looks right to me. 30/60/0 is what I sharpen mine at but others will tell you angles depend on the wood you're cutting. I cut mostly pine and some locust.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Welcome to A.S.!

520 is a nice grinder. All the stuff in this thread applies:


Philbert
 
Herman the German

Herman the German

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I know that you just got the grinder and have a desire to grind your chains however I love my Stihl 2 in 1 chain sharpener. It's so freakin easy to use and it is as sharp and perfect as going and buying a new chain if not sharper.., the handle is cut at a 30°angle (both ends) so as you're filing if you keep that angle in line with the bar then the angle of the teeth can't be messed up. All the while it has a flat file that simultaneously puts a grind on the top of the raker as you're filing, and my ol' my does it ever cut next time ya get it in the wood.. there is a huge difference. Sorry I didn't have any info on the grinder but I felt the whole world needs to know about this awesome filing system from stihl.
 
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Herman the German

Herman the German

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It's important to take a little material away from the rakers/ depth gauge when ya file the teeth because as the teeth get filed they get shorter and if ya notice that each tooth is slanted downward as it get closer to the back part (dull side) of tooth and if the raker\depth gauge stays (unground) then each tooth becomes the same height as the cutting edge of the tooth itself then even with a super sharp chain it takes no wood as you try to cut with it, it will act the very same as a super dull chain.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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A few key things on grinding chains:

- start with knowing what you want your cutters to look like after you are done: YOU are grinding / filing / sharpening the chains; those are just the tools that you use.
Grind as You File.png
- you should be grinding with the profiled rim of the wheel, not the side. As @old guy notes: get the cutting edges first, then go back and clean out the gullets, and adjust the depth gauges, in separate passes.

- take lots of little 'taps' to avoid overheating everything.

- lightly dress the wheel, about once per chain loop, to constantly expose fresh, sharp abrasive.

- I encourage all new grinder users to practice on scrap chain first: 'play around', See what small changes in each of the adjustments does to the cutter. Intentionally overheat one cutter, then work backwards to not do that again. Take a chain that really cuts how you like, and try to match that profile with your grinder on another chain: note those settings. Etc.

Philbert
 

ATH

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I know that you just got the grinder and have a desire to grind your chains however I love my Stihl 2 in 1 chain sharpener. It's so freakin easy to use and it is as sharp...
They are great. Pretty sure Pferd makes them - Stihl's is identical to Pferd's (I have one of each, and besides color, you can't tell the difference). But a grinder is good when the chain gets too jacked up.

The biggest thing I have learned with the grinder is not to think of it as a grinder, but a sharpener. Only take off tiny bits. @Philbert 's pictures show what to look for. Nothing about the bottom of the tooth cuts, you are sharpening the top.
 
Herman the German

Herman the German

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They are great. Pretty sure Pferd makes them - Stihl's is identical to Pferd's (I have one of each, and besides color, you can't tell the difference). But a grinder is good when the chain gets too jacked up.

The biggest thing I have learned with the grinder is not to think of it as a grinder, but a sharpener. Only take off tiny bits. @Philbert 's pictures show what to look for. Nothing about the bottom of the tooth cuts, you are sharpening the top.
I realize that the bottom doesn't cut i was just reminding about the rakers is all that was about and just using that as reference. It's hard to explain but as teeth get shorter they are slightly slanted downward (from sharp edge to dull edge the opposite side) just like this( / ) so they eventually become the same height as the rakers as the sharp edge moves further down that slant , but anyway I didn't realize pferd made em. I have seen a bunch of chinese ones on auction sites though. I love the way they work but I'll have to try a grinder one day if my chain gets too jacked up. Ya taught me something there cause I'd never thought of that honestly.
 
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ATH

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....I love the way they work but I'll have to try a grinder one day if my chain gets too jacked up...
I wasn't trying to say that a grinder is the better choice. The 2-in-1 is my first go to when it is time to sharpen. I admittedly sucked at hand sharpening until I got the 2-in-1. But just that I use a grinder every now and then too. (if you really want to make it sing, try a CBN wheel)
 
Kage1339

Kage1339

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Ok did some more grinding today. Attached are some pics. I tried to keep the radius of the wheel higher into the tooth. The first pics are the regrind of the above .325 pitch semi chisel chain. The second pic is a .375 picco. On this chain I felt I barely ground enough. Can I assume that as long as I’ve cleaned up at least .025 down from the top of the tooth I am ok??? Thanks a ton for all the help so far. I really appreciate it!!
 

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Philbert

Philbert

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Go see how they cut; that’s what’s important.

Tip: hold a white piece of paper (3x5 card, etc.) behind the tooth when photographing : it will help your camera lens focus better.

Philbert
 
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