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Chain size and Links

Dario

Dario

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Apr 19, 2020
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Hello, I am new to this forum and new to felling trees. I recently bought a Jon Cutter G5800 with a 20 inch bar and chain. I love this beast, a little heavy but it really goes through wood like butter.
My question is this.....The chain is a 20" 3/8 .058 68DL........I am looking into purchasing a new chain but I am having a hard time. Some cases will say 18" 68DL and some will say 20 inch 72DL. Should I be just looking at the Link numbers and not the length? Thanks for your assistance. Oh while I am at it, I am from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. I need to replace a cutter on my chain, It got pinned and I accidentally hit it while trying to get it unpinned.
 

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Dario

Dario

New Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2020
Messages
4
Age
56
Location
Quebec
Drine link number & gauge size (.058 in your case)






Thanks for the quick reply, helps a lot. If I want to go with a 24" bar. Do does the .058 or .050 matter if I get a combo? Is the 3/8 most important to fit the sprocket.
I am trying to figure out what all those numbers mean.
Thanks again.











.058 gauge
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Welcome to A.S.

'Pitch', 'gauge', and 'drive link count' are what you need to know, to see if a chain will fit.

The drive sprocket , guide bar, and chain work together as a system: change one, and you may need to change the others.

Some saw shops will replace damaged cutters. Some will not. If it is damaged, but not bent (the chain still runs smoothly), consider just grinding of filing it back.

Philbert
 
nscoyote

nscoyote

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nova scotia
When replacing chains, you will need to know pitch, gauge, and drive Link count.
Check the side plate of your bar it should ha e this information stamped in it near or just forward of the stud slot. 3/8 pitch is the most common pitch in home owner saws but there are others, .058 is the most common gauge but could also be .050 or .063 gauge. Drive Link count is bar length specific and often brand specific ie18" bar of one brand could require a different link count then an 18" bar of a different brand.
When replacing chains flip your bar and also check the condition of the rails for burrs and or mushroomiñg or splaying.
 
blades

blades

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.050 gauge is more common on .375 pitch, .058 is is more common on .325 pitch with .404 pitch coming in at .063 .375 x.058 is a stronger chain but not something you find hanging on the wall at a box store. Jon cutter = Farmer Tech chain saw, recommended chain is .375 x .058
 
Philbert

Philbert

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0.058" gauge was something promoted by Husqvarna, as I understand. 0.063 was more common on STIHL saws. Some of this is just carry over / anachronistic stuff in my mind.

0.063" it a thicker drive link that will resist lateral force better, and many say will oil better, due to the wider groove. But it is also heavier. This does not sound significant, but note that race saw guys will go to extreme measures to lighten up a race chain. The battery and low HP saws are going to narrow kerf cutters and thinner drive links (0.043") to make lighter chains that increase the effective power of the saw powerhead.

When you start spinning chains, you realize that some 0.050" gauge chains are really 0.058" or 0.063" at the top, then swaged down! Can make you crazy looking at all the possibilities unless you simply pick something that works for you.
Swaged Drive Links.png

Philbert
 
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blades

blades

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what counts size wise is the portion that rides in the bar groove. and the drive link spacing to match same on sprockets. I really dislike those .043 links- unless the clamp on the grinder is fairly new they dance around as they are pretty short depth wise as well ( wear and tear at top edge of clamp bars ) - I keep a couple sets of machine clamp bars around just for those little buggers. I also have some 1/16" ( apx 2.5mm )wheels for those pico and pico pico iterations that show up from the electric saws and those pole saws. some of those 325 chains can be a real pia as well.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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I'll bet those break easy if they are stone!
The grinding wheels on the Harbor Freight type grinders are typically 1/8" thick, in the smaller (4-1/8" - 4-1/4") diameter. These typically have limited choices for cutter angles, etc., but could be good for these small chains.

For the 5-3/4" diameter Oregon / Tecomec style grinders the thinnest I find are the 1/8" thick ones.
Screen shot 2020-04-28 at 2.15.21 PM.png Screen shot 2020-04-28 at 2.17.16 PM.png

Philbert
 
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