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Chains not properly oiling

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by Wow, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. Wow

    Wow ArboristSite Operative

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    Thought I'd post a little trick that may help someone.
    Today I worked on a cs352 Echo. The chain sounded tinny, like metal on metal. A quick check revealed an improperly oiled chain yet the oil was going somewhere. In fact it was dripping at the clutch drive. I checked and
    found the bar was clean and the oil supply hole was open but what was the problem?.
    Well this is what I found.
    The chain had worn and allowed the bar to extend a tiny bit to far forward. The bar oil hole couldn't get enough oil flow from the oil pump and pressure blew it out past the chain supply.
    The oil pump exhaust port is a slit on the saw which allows the bar to be moved back and forth and still be able to get oil to the chain but in this case the slit on the saw was not quiet long enough to match the bar oil hole.
    The bar in question is a standard Echo bar. This model saw uses a big hole in the bar unlike some Echo models which reminds me of a Sthil bar. Some Poulan bars will fit some small Echo saws.
    As the bar was moved farther forward the supply slit was not big enough for a proper oil flow.
    To fix the problem I needed to enlongate the bar oil hole. A small drill was placed just behind the bar oil hole and a small hole was drilled. NOT very deep. I DIDN'T drill all way through the bar. Then a bigger drill enlarged that hole and tied both holes together. By angling the bit the 2 holes formed a shallow groove. That groove allows a better oil flow to the bar hole and oils the chain well.
    I'm sure a lot of people do something similar but I've not seen anything posted on it so I felt just maybe someone might like to hear it from me.
    The biggest problem could possibly be if someone makes to much enlongation. With the bar set back to accommodate a new chain an oil leak may occur. In some cases just removing a link fixes this but not everyone has the tools for that and most people have drills.
    Good luck.
     
  2. Little Al

    Little Al Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Standard practice slotting the oil hole/or grooving it some of the older bars came from the factory with a groove deep at the hole end tapering to zero A 1/8th diamond burr in a Dremel is a good modding tool you could shorten the chain 1 link that would line up you oilslot/hole
     
  3. Wow

    Wow ArboristSite Operative

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    Yes, thanks. Removing a link is how I prefer except it appears my chain tool is missing. I felt sorry for a young man and let him move a small trailer out here. To thank me he stole me blind. Karma got him shortly after. He's had a stroke and now uses a cane to get around. Not only is he handicapped he won't ever be welcome here again. So sad for him. What a fool. I'll probably never buy another Chain tool. I've replaced most but don't want to do more than I have to. Supposedly, I'm retired. However, I'd probably die within a week if I sat down. Have a great day.
     

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