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Climbing gear?

03machstock

03machstock

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 24, 2019
Messages
8
Location
Pennsylvania
Hi guys, I’m a firewood guy (for myself for now) that’s looking to get into climbing trees. Don’t want to do anything crazy , cut some branches the pole saw can’t reach, maby top some smaller trees that are close to a structure. I don’t know anything about climbing, I’m trying to find a class locally to learn but no luck yet. Anyway, what gear would I need to do the described work at a minimum?
Thanks
 

Yarz

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
92
Location
Tarentum, PA
At a minimum?
A climbing rope
A saddle
And a lanyard/flipline

That would allow you to climb a tree using a doubled rope technique, now commonly called moving rope system, and also to tie in twice while making your cuts.
It's highly recommended that you add PPE (helmet, eye protection, ear protection, etc.)

Additionally:
A throwline/weights would make setting your climb line easier in some trees, and possible in others.
Spurs (only if you're doing removals) can aid in movement throughout the tree.

Some companies offer kits. Browse Treestuff, SherrillTree, Baileysonline, etc.

After that, it's up to you how much you want to spend and what system/gadgets you'd like to use. There are plenty of threads on here and videos on YouTube explaining the different systems and equipment. It's a fun skill to learn.:rock2:

One more thing: buy, read, and re-read The Tree Climbers Companion by Jeff Jepson. Then, once you do begin climbing, always practice everything low and slow before doing actual work, to minimize the chance of injury.


P.S. Topping trees is typically not recommended
 
old CB

old CB

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Jul 4, 2011
Messages
809
Location
CO
And find climbing instruction. Jepson's book is invaluable--get it--but you will do best with a class. Two weekends will get you well started. Talking to someone well-versed in the real deal will give you a better idea of what gear you need for starters.

Getting up in the trees on rope is very rewarding. Do what it takes to get you there. You won't regret it.
 
NeSurfcaster

NeSurfcaster

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Apr 8, 2018
Messages
374
Location
South Jersey
I started on drt/mrt and still use it often on removals and redirects. Yale blue moon is a nice rope or any traditional 16 strand 1/2" climbing rope. A few throw bags and some throwline in a cheap cube will make things much easier. Learn a hitch and just fool around a few feet off the ground, ascend/descend over and over.
 
03machstock

03machstock

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 24, 2019
Messages
8
Location
Pennsylvania
Thanks for all the reply’s guys, my email notification for responses just came in now, sorry for the long time before I replied. I’m from south east pa, near spring city. Iv found 2 schools that have climbing seminars, but there’s nothing in the immediate future due to Covid stuff. I’ll read up on what everyone posted.
 
stihl86

stihl86

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
994
Location
Northeast
Save your money and body parts. Buy a used bucket truck. LOL
All the instructions and finest gear and toys wont help unless you're in very good shape. Not gym rat shape.
You may very well be, and I'm not trying to insult you, but it's the first priority.
Before spending a penny.
 
CIAmike11

CIAmike11

I don’t discriminate, all saws welcome
Joined
Jan 26, 2020
Messages
387
Location
Northern NY
Yea but there’s some trees that bucket trucks, cranes and lifts just can’t get too or do, then you have to climb, and I must say from an arborist point of view... being in shape... stretching when needed and training your body to handle the abuse of climbing is vital to a safe, long and prosperous career
 
CIAmike11

CIAmike11

I don’t discriminate, all saws welcome
Joined
Jan 26, 2020
Messages
387
Location
Northern NY
No amount of thought, YouTube videos or preparation can really prepare you for the actual act and energy level/ stamina needed to climb, limb, full take down, top out and do it all on a timely, safe manner. Many times when you get to that level... multiple trees a day, day in and day out
 
Harmon

Harmon

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
61
Location
Haines
One way to get in shape to climb trees is by dragging brush to a chipper with the added benefit of getting paid with the side benefit of you could learn from climbers with experience. I have no experience with tree climbing school and education is valuable but I would say if a person was to pay for a class one on tree biology and tree health care (THC) might be $ well spent if a guy wanted to branch out (ha ha) past just removals. It can also be handy when talking to your more refined customers who can be um particular about their trees.

Used bucket truck?
 
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