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Clutch issues milling? Take a look at mine

Brent Nowell

Brent Nowell

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Got the black rubber gloves on and did a semi physical on the saws and found this on the clutch drum for the 395xp.
E5E0F1E8-EC8B-4A8B-92A9-8A49C521C317.jpeg
The clutch pack looked good, no bluing at all there, but the drum as you can see is quite scorched. This saw is used with the 36” Alaskan mill .
The 372 I use with an internal clutch drum looked great, this saw is used with the Alaskan edger in a veritical position.
Both chains are sharp, I know this because I was getting zero stretch out of the two after the day was over last Sunday. Also I sharpened them before they were brought out.

The only thing I can think of is that I did not and have not used wedges with the 395xp and the 36” Alaskan mill. Could the wood be pinching slightly on the blade, causing the saw to work harder? I always thought the wedges were used for better wood face appearance.
I would appreciate what you guys would think.
 
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rarefish383

rarefish383

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I mill with a 660 or an old Homelite Super 1050. I tend to run my chains a little on the loose side. But, that's relative, what I call loose, someone else may call tight. I like to be able to take 2 fingers and pick up on the chain and pull the tip of the driver up to the top of the rail. It will fall back down, not snap down. I like to be able to pull the chain around on the bar with 2 fingers also. I know guys that brag how the go through 2-3 bars a year cutting firewood. I have 40 year old bars that look like new as far as rails go. My point is running the chain too tight can burn up bars and clutches also.
 
grizz55chev

grizz55chev

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I mill with a 660 or an old Homelite Super 1050. I tend to run my chains a little on the loose side. But, that's relative, what I call loose, someone else may call tight. I like to be able to take 2 fingers and pick up on the chain and pull the tip of the driver up to the top of the rail. It will fall back down, not snap down. I like to be able to pull the chain around on the bar with 2 fingers also. I know guys that brag how the go through 2-3 bars a year cutting firewood. I have 40 year old bars that look like new as far as rails go. My point is running the chain too tight can burn up bars and clutches also.
Your way of tightening the chain is just the way I’ve always done it. Never have worn out a bar, most still have the original paint. If you can’t rotate the chain with 2 fingers, there’s a problem.
 
Brent Nowell

Brent Nowell

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Well thx guys for the input. I always tighten my chain just to take up slack and nothing more. Never had a problem pushing it even with one finger :)
I’ll just keep on truckin
 
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