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Complete tree removal including stump

ArtB

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backhoecrush.jpg

Don't forget to move any equipment out of the way also. This was 4 ft DBH cottonwood about 90 ft up hit backhoe parked too close, 10 deg off to side of inline cable pull. Cable was double 5/8" wire rope on 4:1 blocks and 6T winch. 1/2" side cable drug another 15,000# machine 10 ft sideways (the side 'anchor') as root ball wanted to go to the side by 10 degrees.

And yourself 50 ft beyond and possible ground impact areas.

Be careful, spent 2 weeks in hospital 45 years ago after pulling a tree on my head - got careless after having pulled a few hundred tree previously clearing a road.
 

ArtB

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PS: You will need about a million ft pound torque pull a 2-1/2 ft dia pine reliably
50 foot up, 5 or 6 Ton winch, at least one block.
On the cottonwood above, had double blocks and double 5/8" wire rope 70 ft up on 6T winch = about 3.5 million ft-# torque on root ball. Pulled right over but went off to the side!
 
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Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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I have never had any tree move but a couple of inches except exactly where it was being pulled. As the roots start to break the trees often swing one way or the other way a little, but end up following the cable. I have spent many days thinking if I start early will have the thing where it should be before dark. What seems to happen is you pull and pull then you need to reset your cable which can take hours. Remember there is thousands of pounds of energy stored in the tree so releasing the cable can be slow. With the reset cable you think for sure now, but not always. Once a few of the roots start to break they just seem to start flying out of the hole. Thanks
 
derwoodii

derwoodii

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I just did what you want done last Sunday, follow the link to pictures.. I suggest get hire buy a 3 ton tirfor winch with pully block and a good shovel & axe or buy a loop of tungsten saw chain... as your 1st time it will be a PITA but pines a generally easy roots so peck away in time you get it over. Your not done but,, as you got to break up & roll away dispose of dirty stump



back in the day boss would give me a shovel axe and T3 tirfor winch say be back later get it out... i became pretty handy at hand tool stump digging so today was a time travel to 1981 but the tungsten saw was a great help

https://www.arboristsite.com/commun...-dribble-thread.175005/page-2073#post-6979561
 
TNTreeHugger

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As you can see the place is old. Built in 1900 old. IF the tree fell on the house I would be sad, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world.
Just a casual observer here... never took down a tree but have had several giant trees come down during storms in my yard over the past 25 years.
Just a few things you might want to consider...
Looks like you're going to spend more money on equipment to take the tree down than what the house is worth, no offense (I have a 100+ year-old farmhouse also).
Looks like the tree is on the edge of a steep slope. Will you be pulling from the down side of the slope? Seems to me it would make it easier to take down if you were to expose the roots on the slope, sever as many as you can get to, then thoroughly soak the root area before pulling. I know from pulling weeds, they pop right out of the ground, root and all when they are saturated - won't budge when dry.

Last, but not least, no one has mentioned PPE. I think that should be your first purchase. Trees are a lot heavier than they look.
Good luck. Hope you have someone to record the event for you and that you'll share with us. :)

You know, after looking at the photos again, is it possible you're looking for an excuse to buy some new toys? :D The bulk of the tree appears to be leaning away from the house and there is nothing, but the insignificant farmhouse within striking distance. Why not just buy a chain saw and take it down at the ground? Seems to me that would be the simplest thing to do... but, I've never actually taken a tree down, so... what do I know? ;)
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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From what I have seen is that when you pull at least half way up a tree it the tree goes toward where ever it is pulled much more than lower down. Also every one talks about a massive winch which is totally not true. I believe that for most part I could take down any tree with just one come a long. The amount of snatch blocks needed might be ridiculous though. My powered winch I am sure can not pull straight 10,000 lb load, but can yank out huge trees like they were in wet grass. The reason being is minus friction every pulley will double the pulling force. I try to keep a large array of pulleys on hand for that purpose. I aim to have two more than I need for extra support. Thanks
 
TNTreeHugger

TNTreeHugger

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PS
You better hope when the roots pop up out of the ground they don't pull the house off those concrete blocks.
This is the most recent tree to come down in my yard... a massive hickory... and the roots on it were mostly rotten.
 

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CacaoBoy

CacaoBoy

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I understand your desire to remove all the roots to prevent decomposition under footings. However, I think it would be safer for you and the existing house if you just cut the tree down. You could compensate for the decaying roots by driving piles to support the new addition. You might save on equipment more than the cost of driving piles. Even if you would fill the hole with compacted crushed rock there still would be disturbed soil left behind that would be likely to settle, and you might find it necessary in a few years to raise and level the addition.
 
Michael Howell

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Was able to get a pretty good deal today towards the cause. Big cable $50. Smaller one $40. Both somewhere around 75’ long. I figure these will work for attaching 3/4’s way up the tree. Don’t plan on using these huge guys on block and tackle. Just using these to make up the long distance.

Still need advice on block setups that have worked for others. Think you could remember the specifics Ted of a big tree you’ve pulled?

 
Jed1124

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I really don’t know why you guys are entertaining this gentleman’s idea. It’s an easy drop from what I can see.
Set a good line up high (50’-60’). Cut a face with your new saw and send it. Use the hoe you were going to dig the roots up with to attach to the line for a pull and then dig up the root ball. Easy peasy.
All this talk of block and tackle is way over thinking things.
 

Del_

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I really don’t know why you guys are entertaining this gentleman’s idea. It’s an easy drop from what I can see.
Set a good line up high (50’-60’). Cut a face with your new saw and send it. Use the hoe you were going to dig the roots up with to attach to the line for a pull and then dig up the root ball. Easy peasy.
All this talk of block and tackle is way over thinking things.
I'm pretty sure this thread is a joke and we are just going along for the ride.

If it isn't, it should be.

No saw, no rope, no previous experience.

I'm waiting for the guy to say he has only one arm!
 
68 Buick

68 Buick

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I really don’t know why you guys are entertaining this gentleman’s idea. It’s an easy drop from what I can see.
Set a good line up high (50’-60’). Cut a face with your new saw and send it. Use the hoe you were going to dig the roots up with to attach to the line for a pull and then dig up the root ball. Easy peasy.
All this talk of block and tackle is way over thinking things.
I agree, I would even question why Pull the stump.
 
Jed1124

Jed1124

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I'm pretty sure this thread is a joke and we are just going along for the ride.

If it isn't, it should be.

No saw, no rope, no previous experience.

I'm waiting for the guy to say he has only one arm!
I’m always the sucker that falls for these crazy threads......
 
Ted Jenkins

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[QUOTE=Still need advice on block setups that have worked for others. Think you could remember the specifics Ted of a big tree you’ve pulled?

Ok let us start at the beginning. First how are you going to pull come a long tractor or RV mounted winch. Once that is decided then one can work forward.
Each pulley or block will double your pulling force. You are going to need about five blocks if your pulling force is 3,000 LBS. It make take more taking into account of how moist is the soil and is the tree acclimated to moisture near the surface or not. Of course digging around the tree to sever tree roots will help with removal. My rule of thumb has been to use chain near the top of the tree because it needs to be a for sure that there will not be a equipment failure. Then use the cable with the block and tackle. For cable 3/8 to 1/2'' use a pulley that is about 6'' diameter. You will need an assortment of 1/2'' cable clamps to work with the different cables. For splicing use at least two for in line use. For thimble use maybe one will work. I have fabricated many of my snatch blocks using what ever come up. If you go to amazon you will likely pay 60 to $80 each. Go to fleabay and CL and you might find used. The more you have the easier the job will be. five on one side with five on the downward side would not be too much. You will likely exert 100,000 LBS of force or more before you are done. Thanks
 
under_the_hill

under_the_hill

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I know, I know the best way is to call a professional. I’m not going to take the call a professional route.
So you want to ask a professional for advice, but ignore all the professional advice you get except for what you want to hear. This is a common rudeness. At least have the attitude about you to take your lumps as most of the people here tell you to call a professional instead of defining for the professional what they can and cannot give an answer to.

If this were not a joke post and you truly wanted to invest in yourself, you would be getting training in some manner, not buying equipment or telling professionals what advice they can offer you.
 
under_the_hill

under_the_hill

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I'm pretty sure this thread is a joke and we are just going along for the ride.

If it isn't, it should be.

No saw, no rope, no previous experience.

I'm waiting for the guy to say he has only one arm!
"Want to go with a STIHL. Budget for that is $1500.00 and under."

Really gives the joke away there. Just starting with an MS660 with a 36" bar or something like that.
 
Marine5068

Marine5068

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Thanks for the response. The only issue I worry with grinding the stump is that a foundation will need to be poured right where the stump is. I worry about that decaying in 5-10-15 years and my foundation cracking.
Then you need to spend the money and get an excavator machine to remove that stump.
Plain and simple.
 
Natster

Natster

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Um, when you are done, can I have the excavator?
I like excavator!
;)
To the op, it's something I'd do. Even the point of asking about an item I felt unsure about. (Like the tackling to pull it down).
N
 
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