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Oregonsaw

Oregonsaw

Fledgling Saw hoarder
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I’m thinking of getting a truck load of pecker poles. Can anyone tell me about how many cords are on a log truck.

Thank you
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
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Many of you know states vary as to how much lbs can be moved on public Highways. Here in California as far as hardwood goes that would be between 12 and 13 cords of dry Oak. For softwood Pine that would be about 20 cord of very dry wood. As far as board feet it varies by several factors, but if you are roughly calculating cords that would be 12 and 20. 80,000 lbs gross is max here. Being an agriculture load you can some times get by with the moisture content varies. DOT people may or may not buy as they have there own rules and how they feel. They do not follow the laws or the letter of the laws. Thanks
 
ChoppyChoppy

ChoppyChoppy

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entirely depends on type of truck, weight of the wood, integrity of driver...

long logs figure at least 8 full cord, probably closer to 11
Exactly. We usually get ~8-10 cords on the truck, all depending on how long and straight the logs are.
That's a setup with self loader and a "reach trailer", like this style: (yes, I'm too lazy to dig into my photos to pull up ones of the actual truck)
 
ChoppyChoppy

ChoppyChoppy

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I bought logs from a guy that brought in equipment from WA to do a job around here. He had tri drive trucks pulling a 4 axle pup trailer. We averaged about 40-45 tons of logs per load. We figured on about 2.5 tons a cord, so in the area of 18 cords or so.
The drivers said even with 550hp engines and 18 speeds, it pulled HARD on the couple medium sized hills between their landing and our log yard.

I bet it took forever to offload 25 cord loads with that little trailer loader? We took the trailer off the load truck and used that loader. They had a fairly new guy running shovel loader on the other end so it worked out well that we were able to keep up. Only blew 1 hose on the loader with unloading about 1000 tons of logs.


I grew up in Northern Maine where it's not uncommon to see log loads in the 150-200k area between 2 and even 3 trailers. I bet that takes a while to get up to speed!
I know when we were driving around on the logging roads and saw a cloud of dust a ways ahead, it was best to find a pull out or get over in the ditch as far as possible, because something like this was on it's way, and it pretty well took up the road... at 50mph!

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/62/40/6c/62406caf5d3917364444aa37a3698bab.jpg
 
catbuster

catbuster

Catskinner. And buster.
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90,000 lbs of logs plus truck weight? That’s like grossing 120,000. I hope that guy had a permit or it would have been game over of those trucks were pulled over, and it would have been obvious to any vehicle enforcement officer.

1 hose in 1000 tons isn’t really impressive. That’s ~40 legal loads.

Trucks that size running down undeveloped roads at 50 is just undeniably stupid. I don’t care how awesome the brakes are, how good the retarder is, if it has a jake or not, that’s just ignorant and unsafe.
 
windthrown

windthrown

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Typical logging truck here in the PWN has about 3 to 4 MBF per load, which comes out to 9-12 green cords, but its 7-10 dry cords by the time they season. This is for Doug Fir logs that are pretty heavy when they are green.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
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In the 70's I worked in Northern Oregon for the USFS designing building roads for timber sales. At least that is where I ended up at that time of my life. Later on I was hired as a helitack crew member thank goodness. We had a small RV park at the bottom of a fairly long hill. During the warmer months the logging trucks would stand on their jake brakes about 5 AM most mornings with their loads going to the mills. No one that I knew worried about an alarm clocks since the ground would start to shake. There were several mills within an hour or two drive from our site so no one worried about what the load amounted to. It was common for the loads to weigh in at 150,000 lbs gross or more. The drivers would make sure that the wives or kids were patrolling the highway for LE. On one particular morning a truck lost control or brakes and plowed through some of the trailers killing three including the driver. With in a month or so the investigators stated the accident was likely mechanical failure. Every thing went back to normal. The drivers had the attitude that at any time the mills or logs could run out so get as many loads out as possible. Thanks
 
northmanlogging

northmanlogging

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In the 70's I worked in Northern Oregon for the USFS designing building roads for timber sales. At least that is where I ended up at that time of my life. Later on I was hired as a helitack crew member thank goodness. We had a small RV park at the bottom of a fairly long hill. During the warmer months the logging trucks would stand on their jake brakes about 5 AM most mornings with their loads going to the mills. No one that I knew worried about an alarm clocks since the ground would start to shake. There were several mills within an hour or two drive from our site so no one worried about what the load amounted to. It was common for the loads to weigh in at 150,000 lbs gross or more. The drivers would make sure that the wives or kids were patrolling the highway for LE. On one particular morning a truck lost control or brakes and plowed through some of the trailers killing three including the driver. With in a month or so the investigators stated the accident was likely mechanical failure. Every thing went back to normal. The drivers had the attitude that at any time the mills or logs could run out so get as many loads out as possible. Thanks
150k on a west coast truck?

that some bullshit right there.

many of those 70's trucks are still operating out here, and I've driven them, getting up to 90k is a balancing act, anything over that risks being over height.

105500# is current legal limit, and that generally means truck and pup, or super trains as they are referred too
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
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North I never implied any of the trucks were legal. I do not think the trucks were over height requirements, but weight yes. They had there codes and CB radios with extra channels going full bore. I was in Pendleton two months ago so I went through some of my old turf and there is nothing going on. At least two mills that were booming in the 70.s are just collecting weeds. In my opinion it was way more rare for a truck to be legal in any way during those days. I can not say I blame them because those guys knew lean times were ahead. Thanks
 
northmanlogging

northmanlogging

The gyppo's gyppo
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North I never implied any of the trucks were legal. I do not think the trucks were over height requirements, but weight yes. They had there codes and CB radios with extra channels going full bore. I was in Pendleton two months ago so I went through some of my old turf and there is nothing going on. At least two mills that were booming in the 70.s are just collecting weeds. In my opinion it was way more rare for a truck to be legal in any way during those days. I can not say I blame them because those guys knew lean times were ahead. Thanks
what you don't seem to understand is that it is physically impossible to load a 70's west coast log truck that heavy, as in no where to put the logs that they won't roll off, not to mention the damage to bearings and frames, and lets just not even think about anything over 400hp being reliable at least until the mid 80's

CB's with extra chanels?

secret codes?

wifes and girl friends roaming the highways like gypsies on the lookout for the fuzz...

what the **** is this play time

also for those paying attention, Pendleton is cattle country, some logging yes, but mostly cows

The 70's may have been a different time, but wifes and girl friends don't change, getting them to run cover for your illicit affairs is troublesome at best and ill-advisable at most, so maybe you should check into Alzheimers/dementia screening
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
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North did you ever go to Dale Oregon in the 70's. I did as a matter of fact lived there. Population 60 to 70 when I did. It has been put up for auction lately. My recent friend owned the town of Ritter. On 395 there are two mills with there own RR access just sitting as we speak was just there recently. The road to the ranger station was never very steep until the last few hundred yds going through the ranger station. Ask me how I know. I was part of the team that designed that road as it is still there. The trucks that I observed and I never weighed them personally, but was told by many that they were way over loaded with trailer axles extended as far as possible with logs protruding several feet out the back and stacked as high as possible inside the forks. I would say the tractor trailers could haul very large loads aside from legal because grade was never much and it appeared they did. I worked in the Umatilla Ranger District which was named after the Umatilla Indian tribe to the west. The CB radio chatter never stopped on those trucks and some times into the night. The FS could not care what kind of loads went out or if the roads were safe. As long as the roads met specifications no one was concerned. Truck and driver could make several round trips in a day because the mills were not as far as Pendleton. Most every one met in Ukiah before dark to test the beverages. At least that is what I observed in those days. I can not say that was my most enjoyable days of life, but did learn a great deal more about falling timber than I had previously. Thanks
 
northmanlogging

northmanlogging

The gyppo's gyppo
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North did you ever go to Dale Oregon in the 70's. I did as a matter of fact lived there. Population 60 to 70 when I did. It has been put up for auction lately. My recent friend owned the town of Ritter. On 395 there are two mills with there own RR access just sitting as we speak was just there recently. The road to the ranger station was never very steep until the last few hundred yds going through the ranger station. Ask me how I know. I was part of the team that designed that road as it is still there. The trucks that I observed and I never weighed them personally, but was told by many that they were way over loaded with trailer axles extended as far as possible with logs protruding several feet out the back and stacked as high as possible inside the forks. I would say the tractor trailers could haul very large loads aside from legal because grade was never much and it appeared they did. I worked in the Umatilla Ranger District which was named after the Umatilla Indian tribe to the west. The CB radio chatter never stopped on those trucks and some times into the night. The FS could not care what kind of loads went out or if the roads were safe. As long as the roads met specifications no one was concerned. Truck and driver could make several round trips in a day because the mills were not as far as Pendleton. Most every one met in Ukiah before dark to test the beverages. At least that is what I observed in those days. I can not say that was my most enjoyable days of life, but did learn a great deal more about falling timber than I had previously. Thanks
so your basically admitting you assumed the whole story from second hand info

so hows about ya just stop there instead of spreading garbage for the world to read.
 
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